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Human Rights In China

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Amanda S

on 29 January 2014

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Transcript of Human Rights In China

Torture
Executions
There are 68 crimes that are punishable by death in China including non violent ones. The death penalty in China was criticized by many human rights groups and governments around the world.
Labor Issues
Freedom of Movement
In order to be able to move in and outside of the country, you need many permits and to go through a system to get approval. The government has made it very hard for their citizens to travel as there are many restrictions.
Other Human Rights Violations
China is guilty of the following:
Creating the One Child Policy
Torture
Executions (Death Penalty)
Labor Issues
Censoring the Internet
The human rights situation in China is a big problem. They have violated many freedoms including freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and freedom of movement. They have also violated many other forms of human rights.
Human Rights In China
Amanda Seredynski
Gebka

China is a country in Asia with a population of over 1.3 billion people. It is one of the biggest countries (land area) in the world, and it has the largest population.
It is one of the few places that still openly uses communism. Communism is much different from the types of governing that we know and experience.
the official flag of the
Communist Party in China
It is a type of governing in which the state has complete control of the economy. All power, control and authority is held by the party in power.
Freedom of Speech
Freedom of Religion
Article 35. Citizens of the People's Republic of
China enjoy freedom of speech, of the press, of assembly, of association, of procession and of demonstration.
Although the 1982 Constitution guarantees this freedom, the government censors a lot of what people can see and say. Anything that is against the government or involves topics that they don't want the public knowing about is removed.
Article 36. Citizens of the People's Republic of China enjoy freedom of religious belief.
All members of the Communist Party are officially required to be atheists.
Even though the Constitution says that citizens are able to have religious beliefs or refrain from having them, there are only certain religions supported by the government. Any people that practice a religion that is not can be tortured or forced to convert. They are subject to prosecution.
One Child Policy
This policy was created in 1979 to help with the overpopulation issue.
This policy makes it illegal for a family to have more than one child. What's the problem with it? It is handled by forcing abortions (sometimes sex-selective) and female infanticide. This is why the number of males in China is much higher than the number of females.
This policy was taken less seriously in the rural areas.
It is estimated that at least 250 million births have been prevented using their methods.
The One Child Policy violates many human rights.
Torture is used in many detention facilities in China. This includes police stations, jails, and other containment locations. There are an insane amount of forms of torture that they use in China. Believe it or not, in earlier times there were even harsher methods being used.
Issues with Executions
Wrongful Executions: There are few cases of wrongful execution in China.
Organ Harvesting: Prisoners who are to be executed can give written consent to allow their organs to be used for medical purposes. However, there is proof that 2/3 of organ transplants were possible because of executed prisoners and done without consent.
Article 42. Citizens of the People's Republic of China have the right as well as the duty to work.
The Constitution says that citizens can and should work. However, worker's rights and privacy are not respected on the job.
There were minimum wage violations, extended working hours, and unfair treatment in the workplace.
Internet Censoring
The Chinese Government censors all of what can be seen on the internet. They want to be in complete control. It limits how people can express themselves and takes away certain human rights.
More than 15000 websites are blocked and there are people specifically hired to monitor the internet.
All of this causes problems because people believe they should have access to information from and about the rest of the world.
The most important thing they want blocked is anything to do with
current affairs.
Out of Country Travel
Depending on the purpose and duration of your travel, you will need to address different departments of the government. They do prevent certain people from travelling using the law.
In order to travel, you must gain permission in the form of exit certificates.
Inside Country
Moving within China is quite difficult because you must get permission from the government to move. This is The Hukou Household Registration System.
It is even more difficult when you are trying to move from rural locations to urban areas.
Conclusion
China needs to re-evaluate their laws and way of governing. There are a lot of problems with human rights that need to be addressed. Chinese citizens should be allowed to make their own choices.

Why do they have to suffer? There is no reason for it. Every person deserves to be treated right regardless of where they live.
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