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Understanding ASL Syntax

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Brittany Adams

on 23 January 2013

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Transcript of Understanding ASL Syntax

B.Adams ASL 1B ASL Grammar Visually Accurate Active Voice V.S Passive Voice ASL is "“a visual-gestural language which incorporates facial grammatical markers, physical affect markers, spatial linguistic information and fingerspelling, as well as signs made with the hands” (Humphrey and Alcorn). ACTIVE VOICE
When the SUBJECT performs the activity, this is ACTIVE VOICE.
Example:
Phillip passed the test; or, My sister promised she would go.

PASSIVE VOICE
When the OBJECT receives the activity, this is PASSIVE VOICE.
Example:
The test was passed; or,
The promise was made that my sister would go. - *Parts of Speech* Noun Verb Adjective Adverb Pronoun Preposition Conjunction Interjection Person, place, thing
(includes concept, idea, or animal). Replaces a noun.
(e.g. ME, HE/SHE/IT,
THEM/THEY/THOSE, WE/US) Modifies a verb.
(e.g. CLEARLY, TENTATIVELY,
HORRIBLY, NEARLY, QUITE, GLEEFULLY) Describes the relationship of two or more nouns/pronouns in terms of time, distance, or location. (e.g. on, in, behind) Action, or state.
(e.g. DRIVE, DREAM, CONSIDER, REMAIN) Describes a noun.
(e.g. FAT, LITTLE, GROSS, ORANGE,
INVISIBLE,BRIGHT, UNCLEAR) Exclamation without grammatical connection.(e.g. WOW, WHEW, WHAT, OH-I-SEE) Article Gives identity
(specific or nonspecific) to nouns.
(e.g. the; a; an)
Used to connect words, phrases, or clauses.
(e.g. however, although, but, if, and, yet) Topicalization (aka: Topic - Comment) When preparing to launch into ASL discourse
about a new topic, >>Topicalize it. Most topicalized
sentences look like this: [Object-->Subject-->Verb].
There is often a grammatical "pause" for emphasis
after announcing the object.
The pause grammatically ESTABLISHES the topic.
Then,GO ahead with the remainder of the sentence,
which is referred to as the comment. Written or spoken communication Topic Examples Topicalization word-order is:
Object Subject Verb

Here's an example:
YOU , ME, LOVE.
Using the example, the elements are:
YOU = Object ; ME = Subject ; LOVE = Verb Tenses Most often, events are conveyed in sequential order (the order in which they will, should, or did occur).
In contrast, English-users conjugate verbs
to convey tense, and are as likely to convey events out of order as they are to convey them sequentially. The present tense is assumed, unless otherwise established. Therefore, the English equivalent of
"YESTERDAY ME SWIM" (ASL)
might be
"I went swimming yesterday" or "I swam yesterday." (English)

The tense (YESTERDAY) was established, followed by the activity (SWIM), which followed the established tense.

Accordingly, the English equivalent of,
"NEXT-WEEK ME SWIM" (ASL)
might be,
"I will go swimming next week."(English)
SIGN CHOICE


FINISH
BEFORE
SINCE/UNTIL NOW
FROM-THEN/NOW-ON
BACK-UP Tense can also be established using: Sign Location
Toward the rear of the signer's body:
Past tense

Very near to the front of the signer's body:
Present tense

At some distance from the front of the signer's body:
Future tense Subject SUBJECT
In a sentence, the subject is the doer.
The subject is the actor, the one behaving.

Subjects carry-out activities; they do things.
Here's an example:

DOG-MINE FLEA++ HAVE(ASL)
Using the example, the elements are:

DOG-MINE = SUBJECT; FLEA++ = OBJECT; HAVE = VERB The end.
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