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Collaboration and Dissemination

Part 2 of the 'Becoming a Networked Researcher' suite of workshops

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Transcript of Collaboration and Dissemination

Collaboration +
Dissemination

Becoming a Networked
Researcher
part 2
Ned Potter, Academic Liaison Librarian
Academia.edu
Prezi
LinkedIn
Slideshare
Summary
Aim of the session: to get an overview of 4 tools with which to share research, to explore them in groups, and then feedback to your peers.
6 tips for busy academics:

•Doing an interesting lecture? Put your lecture notes in a blog post.
•Writing a detailed email reply? "Reply to public" with a blog post.
•Answering the same question a second time? Put it in a blog post.
•Writing interesting code? Comment a snippet into a post.
•Doing something geeky at home? Blog about what you learned

http://matt.might.net/articles/how-to-blog-as-an-academic/
Add yourself, as an author, to your own blog, under a non-work email address. Should you ever move institutions, you don;'t want to lose access to what you've written.
Or find blogs via:
http://www.google.com/blogsearch
A Guardian Live-chat featuring lots of blogging academics:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/2012/oct/19/academic-blogging-power-pitfalls-livechat
Logistics
Subject-matter
Blogging itself
Further perspectives
Decisions to make early on
Are you blogging as you, as a potentially identifiable pseudonym, or completely anonymously?

Are you blogging alone, with a partner, or as part of a departmental ./ project team?

Is blogging going to be a major activity or a minor activity?
Multi-author blogs are more sustainable, and have a higher post-rate. The more posts you have, the more Google searches you show up in, and so the more views you get..

*Useful* blogs (or blogs with a useful element) tend to get more interest - I smuggle in thoughtful posts among the useful posts, to a bigger audience...

Blogging works best when you write about what you care about
Writing for the web
Promoting your posts
It's easy to blog into a vacuum if you don't tell anyone you're blogging. Do this via Twitter, LinedIn, your email signature, putting your blog URL on your business cards, your conference slides, etc.

Comment on other blog posts.

Write guest posts for other blogs.

Use titles which reveal the content, not obscure it.

Linking to other blogs is the new referencing...
From the authors of the successful British Poltics and Policy blog:

Academics normally like to build up their arguments slowly, and then only tell you their findings with a final flourish at the end. Don’t do this ‘Dance of the Seven Veils’ in which layers of irrelevance are progressively stripped aside for the final kernel of value-added knowledge to be revealed. Instead, make sure that all the information readers need to understand what you’re saying is up front – you’ll make a much stronger impression that way.
In other words, invert the pyramid.
Plus, try and avoid text-only posts.
Some things to keep in mind
And encourage interaction. Allow comments, ask questions, converse.
"How many times have you read a post, or a newspaper article, which you have disagreed with in part because you have better expertise or knowledge? Why keep that to yourself?"
http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/01/14/advice-for-potential-academic-bloggers/
Above all:
Make it as easy as possible for people to share posts and subscribe to your blog.
Thank you
for coming.

(you can write about whatever you want)
A non-academic example - my own blog
After nearly four years:
I'm blogging less but there's more for Google to find so the views are going up:
Evolved over time
About:
- a wiki (!)
- library issues
- new profs
- marketing
- tech guides
- academia
- everything
3000 comments (a proper dialogue)
1500 - 2000 subscribers (more reach than many journals)
350-400 views each day (unless I blog)
Two-and-a-half year timeframe
http://thewikiman.org/blog/
The way my blog works today:
I aim the content at 12-months-ago-me.
What?
Why?
How?
Official definition: "A place to share and follow research"

Relevant definition: Sort of like an 'academic Facebook / LinkedIn' - but you don't have to use it that way...
Academia.edu appears to have a search-engine-ranking deal with the devil! Your academia.edu profile will likely be higher up on Google than your departmental page.

When people are Googling you, greet them with your academic output.
Some very useful thoughts (from Pat Hadley, Archaeology department) are available via the York wiki: http://bit.ly/11JL2Ta


Many researchers upload seemingly everything to their profile (including, in some cases, pre-publication copies of articles, or old and hard-to-find stuff).

No barriers to contacting authors etc, people are nice.
Go to http://www.academia.edu/ and set up a profile - then either just use it to follow your areas of research, put up a CV, articles, and so on.
Top tips...
Do not go mad! Prezi allows you to all sorts of wild things, but the best presentations reign in the mega-zooming or rotation for a couple of impressive moments.

Position materials sympathetically to avoid motion-sickness in the audience.

Use frames and hidden frames to group objects & control what the audience sees.
This Prezi was created in about 20 minutes, using one of the default templates.

For more Prezi guidance, including far more advanced level stuff, go to http://www.thewikiman.org/tech.htm
prezi overview
feedback
Prezi is...
Fairly new - zoomy - non-linear - not PPT - quite sexy
Prezi is not...
The answer to everything - universally popular - as easy to throw together as a rubbish slide deck - yet used across the board in HE
1. Plan the structure and outline of the presentation

2. Add the text, plus any images / videos etc

3. Move them around and arrange them in a coherent order on the canvas

4. Plot the path between them in the order you want to use

5. Click ‘Show’ and watch the presentation back, then refine it if you need to
The basic principles of putting together a Prezi are...
Best practice includes...
1. Only using a fraction of Prezi's capability for the majority of the presentation!

2. Positioning materials sympathetically, and planning your path carefully, to avoid motion sickness in your audience

3. Using hidden frames to control what your audiences see's, and when
For more tips, guidance, and best practice:
The Ultimate Guide to Prezi - http://bit.ly/preziguide
Feedback
The response to trialling Prezi within Academic Liaison has been extremely positive, with all the Librarians using Prezi reporting much increased student engagement, In some cases the students literally sat up straight in their seats and paid more attention!
The undergrad:
"Did you make that presentation yourself?! It was amazing!"

The PhD researcher:
"That was extremely impressive!"

The Academic:
"That went down very well, and generated a much greater response from the students than in previous years – it’s a great presentation format, so do pass on that feedback."






The Head of Department::
"That was absolutely incredible, you'll have to teach us all how to do that"

The Library Rep:
"With the students, you're the cool one in the department now..."









The academic who has since started using Prezi:
"The ideal impact on student engagement is when the immediate aesthetic impact of Prezi - its visual stimuli and narrative innovation - smuggles in a new way of presenting ideas.

I have found that re-writing lectures through Prezi has forced me to cluster key concepts and terms in a new way, and to use the space of the Prezi canvas to make connections between themes and details that were previously obscured by a linear or conventionally narrative lecture presentation."
So we really don't need
any of this
nonsense...
A bit more depth
Rafe Hallet, University of Leeds
What?
Why?
How?
Official definition: "A place to share and follow research"

Relevant definition: Sort of like an 'academic Facebook / LinkedIn' - but you don't have to use it that way...
Academia.edu appears to have a search-engine-ranking deal with the devil! Your academia.edu profile will likely be higher up on Google than your departmental page.

When people are Googling you, greet them with your academic output.
Some very useful thoughts (from Pat Hadley, Archaeology department) are available via the York wiki: http://bit.ly/11JL2Ta


Many researchers upload seemingly everything to their profile (including, in some cases, pre-publication copies of articles, or old and hard-to-find stuff).

No barriers to contacting authors etc, people are nice.
Go to http://www.academia.edu/ and set up a profile - then either just use it to follow your areas of research, put up a CV, articles, and so on.
Full transcript