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Sex Sells:

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Gina Powers

on 28 July 2015

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Transcript of Sex Sells:

Statistics
Introduction
Know the Signs
Spotting Slavery in Schools
Twitter:
@OU_EndSlavery
E-mail:
ohioesm@gmail.com
Instagram:
ou_endslavery
.
.
Introduction:
"
Human trafficking
" is defined by Merriam-Webster dictionary as...
"the illegal movement of people, typically for the purposes of forced labor or commercial sexual exploitation."
The federal
Trafficking Victims Protection Act
(
TVPA
) recognizes sex trafficking as, "...the
recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person
for the purposes of a commercial sex act, in which the commercial sex act is
induced by force, fraud, or coercion
, or in which the person induced to perform such an act has
not attained 18 years of age
, (22 USC § 7102)."
Laws & Statutes
Social
SOCIAL
A Workshop on Sex Trafficking Awareness and Prevention
Sex Sells:
Ohio University End Slavery Movement
Statistics:
Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA):
the foundation of federal human trafficking legislation passed in 2000 offers protection and restitution for victims and established related offenses as federal crimes
Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2003 (TVPRA 2003):
solidifies a federal, civil right for victims to sue their traffickers
TVPRA 2005
: provides a program to shelter minors as well as millions of dollars in grants
TVPRA 2008
: requires employers to provide worker's rights to those applying for visas as well as offers new prevention strategies
TVPRA 2013
: passed as an amendment to the Violence Against Women Act, and also includes emergency response strategies, as well as laws to end child marriage and the buying of products made by trafficking victims
The Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to End the Exploitation of Children Today (PROTECT) Act
: passed in 2003, this law established the Amber Alert system, penalties for child sex slavery, and provided grants for sexual assault victims
National Defense Authorization Act
: passed in 2013, this law enables the government to terminate contracts and funding with organizations involved in trafficking, as well as requires a signed certification that parties requesting more than $500,000 dollars in grants will not engage in any form of trafficking
As the consistently new girl in school, Theresa was perhaps more susceptible to sex trafficking. She lacked a solid group of friends, and was easily charmed by her trafficker's good looks, smooth talk, and wealth.
Remember Theresa Flores?
Visit the
National Missing Children's Registry,
print pictures, and ask workers in airports and hotels/motels if they've seen the children before, or challenge them to sign the Tourism Child-Protection Code of Conduct at
TheCode.org
Track cases of sex trafficking at
slaverymap.org
Buy goods produced by those who were trafficked and are on the road to recovery
Demand that companies weed out forced labor from their production at
chainstorereaction.com
Write to your hometown's school district and notify them of the epidemic, as well as propose a human trafficking statute in their Code of Conduct
Use your knowledge
to educate teachers, professors, other peers, your parents-anyone willing to listen
Melissa Woodward: Becoming a Sex Slave
Basics of Modern Day Slavery
Human trafficking can occur any time in any place. Anyone is risk.
Sex trafficking occurs most frequently in the ages of
12-14 with girls
, and
11-13 with boys
A man or woman may willingly sell sex if they are in need of money, drugs, or other objects, but a
pimp
--someone who collects the victim's profits--will often take control, at which point, this becomes human trafficking. In fact,
90%
of "prostitutes" are trafficked.
Most commonly, sex trafficking is found in
brothels
(either residential or camouflaged as massage parlors and spas),
truck stops, online escort services
(such as backpage.com and craigslist)
, strip clubs, and street-wide prostitution
Laws &
Statutes

Basics
Internationally:
An estimated 28 million
people are enslaved globally
Today,
13 million children
are enslaved around the world
5.5 million
victims of sex trafficking are
children
80%
of trafficking victims are
women
70% of women
are sold into the sex trade industry
50%
of trafficking victims are
children
Human trafficking is a
$150 billion a yea
r business
$99 billion
results from sex slavery
Nationally:

Nearly
250,000 children
are at risk of sexual exploitation
Each year,
100,000 children
are involved in the sex trade
Reports of human trafficking have been reported in
all 50 states
to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center Hotline in 2013
1 in 7 runaway youths
were likely victims of sex trafficking
Sex trafficking victims who work at truck stops must perform sexual acts with
1 to 15 persons per night
and
$5-$500
per sex act in order to earn the daily quota they must give to their pimp
Victims controlled by pimps are required to reach between
$500-$1,000 per night
Immigration agents have estimated that there are approximately
10,000
women being held captive in
underground brothels
in Los Angeles
Who?
Where?
Trafficking occurs internationally as well as in the United States, and even in our own backyards. Just last year, a sex trafficking case was reported in
Athens, Ohio
where a mother sold her 16 year old daughter in exchange for drugs and money.
What?
Types of slavery:
Sex Slavery
Domestic Servitude
Forced Labor
Child Labor
Bonded Labor
Why?
Money is the motive
Billions
of dollars made each year
Human trafficking is the
second most profitable criminal business in the world
next to drug trafficking
Sex trafficking is
extremely
organized
High profit
and
low risk
(sex always sells, and victims often get in trouble with the law before their traffickers do)
Traffickers find it easy to target victims who have been
sexually or domestically abused
,
runaway
from home, or are
foreign
When?
While women account for
80%
of those who are sold into sex slavery, males are also susceptible. Young girls and boys are especially vulnerable.
Most
runaway
children will be offered a "job" selling sex
28 million
people are currently enslaved across the world
If he or she cannot freely leave or are under the age of 18, that person is a
slave
Traffickers force their victims into sex slavery with the use of
violence, threats, lies
, and
debt payment
Traffickers often
promise
a high-paying job to the victim or a better life, and typically develop a
false, affectionate relationship
with the victim. After trust has been established, the trafficker will normally control their victim through serious physical and emotional
abuse, isolation
, and
confiscation
of personal property
Personal Accounts
Theresa Flores:
normal family life
new school
suave trafficker
two years of slavery
SOAP project

Shamere McKenzie:
dancing in college takes a turn to sex slavery
wrongful charges
read the narration here: http://endslaverynow.org/node/40
Prevention
Toledo, Ohio
ranks
fourth
in the U.S. for sex trafficking. Ohio has a continuous, undeniable problem with human trafficking.
Just this past August,
11 men and women
were arrested in a human trafficking sting in Bowling Green, Ohio
Federal Laws
Ohio's Laws on Sex Trafficking:
Ohio has been recognized as one of the most
improved
states in trafficking legislation, but there is still work to be done.
State Representative Teresa Fedor
and
Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine
recently passed the
Safe Harbor Bill
, a law that prevents young victims of trafficking from being wrongfully charged with prostitution
Conviction for sex trafficking has been changed to a penalty of a
minimum 10 years in prison
and classified as a
first degree felony
Sex traffickers must
register
as sex offenders and cannot live within
1,000 feet of a school
Diversion programs
have been created for victims
Victims can pursue
lawsuits
against their trafficker, and prior charges prostitution can be
expunged
from a victim's record
Cases must now be
reported
annually, and
Ohio Peace Officers Training Academy
offers training for police forces
What about other states?

Although Ohio has made significant advancements in progressive trafficking statutes, some states still recognize trafficking as
prostitution
For example, states such as
North and South Dakota
completely
lack
victim assistance, the protection of minors, sex trafficking training, and access to vital assets such as the National Human Trafficking Hotline
Schools at Risk
School age youth are especially risk, and even more so in children with
unstable family situations
and
minimal social support
Traffickers can single out children via
social media websites, chat rooms, after-school activities, at malls, or in clubs
--all without ever leaving his or her hometown
Many school teachers may be unaware of how to identify a victim of human trafficking, and most schools do
not
include a policy on trafficking in their Code of Conduct. Becoming knowledgeable of the signs of sex slavery, such as
physical, behavioral
, and
social changes
can be the difference between life and death.
Resources
Department of Homeland Security-Blue Campaign
End Slavery Now
International Justice Mission
International Labour Office
Live58
National Human Trafficking Resource Center
Ohio Human Trafficking Task Force
Polaris Project
Questions for Thought
What were your initial thoughts or assumptions about human trafficking?
Have you ever witnessed any signs of human trafficking in your community?
What are some reasons victims might be afraid to report their situation?
What would you do if you saw a possible sex trafficking victim in your own classroom?
Red Flags:

Unexplained and/or frequent
absences
from school
Change in
attire
or
relationships
Suspected victim suddenly has
expensive material possessions

Changes in behavior that makes the student
submissive, anxious, depressed, and paranoid
During interactions with said person or student, they
refer another person
to speak on their behalf
Signs of
physical abuse
such as bruises, scratches, etc., or other serious pain
Lack of food (lunch, for example), sleep, water, or basic necessities
Lack of personal possessions
such as driver's licenses or identification cards
A noticeably
older boyfriend or girlfriend
Said victim suddenly uses
drugs
, or appears highly
promiscuous
for one's age group
Inability to freely contact friends and family
Falling asleep
in classes or social situations
Have name specific or "branded"
tattoos
Wearing the
same clothes
on a regular basis
Some Factors to Keep in Mind:
The victim more than likely feels trapped by his or her trafficker by threats to their family or friends, or fear of further mental and/or physical abuse
The trafficker can be a boyfriend, or even a father
Males and females speaking English as a second language may be more prone to sex trafficking as they may not fully understand the situation and be able to verbally reach out to others, or could immigrate from America illegally
How to Do More:
Take the Slavery Footprint Survey at
SlaveryFootprint.org
Research where the food, clothes, and electronics you buy are sourced from, and opt to buy
fair-trade products
that ensure the workers were paid and treated decently, such as coffee and chocolate
Write letters, emails, or make phone calls to State
Representatives
and
Senators
to push for new legislation
Do
research
-there's a sea of articles, tips, books, videos, and stories available at your fingers
Get trained
to fight slavery-there are always ample internet training programs available, as well as ones like this!
Stop watching pornography
-the porn industry and sex trafficking are very closely linked
Write
encouraging letters
to victims of sex trafficking and send them to your local shelter, or visit
THEA21CAMPAIGN.ORG/WRITE-A-LETTER.PHP
Non-profit organizations like
End Slavery Now
are always looking for interns
Get involved with your
church, college, or other clubs
to organize fundraisers for the sexually exploited
Visit
TheCNNFreedomProject.blogs.cnn.com
for up-to-date stories of human trafficking
Call the
National Human Trafficking Hotline
, toll-free, if you suspect that yourself or someone else is a victim of human trafficking at
1-888-373-7888
, or text "
HELP
" or "
INFO
" to
233733
Full transcript