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The Giraffe

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by

Matthew Morin

on 24 January 2017

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Transcript of The Giraffe

The giraffe (Giraffa)
The tallest living terrestrial
The genus consists of eleven species
Giraffa camelopardalis, the type species.
Seven of these species are extinct
Ancestors
Okapi. Before delving into the past.
The okapi is the only other member of the giraffe family, Giraffidae.
Many different types of paths.
Savannas
Woodlands.
Food Source
Giraffes live in habitats where the available food varies throughout the year
Giraffes are herbivores
Eat hundreds of pounds of leaves per week.
Size
Height: Male: 5 – 6 m (Adult), Female: 4.6 m (Adult)
Male: 1,200 kg, Female: 830 kg
A giraffe's 6-foot (1.8-meter) neck weighs about 600 pounds (272 kilograms). The legs of a giraffe are also 6 feet (1.8 meters) long.
The Giraffe
Habitats
"Giraffa"

Origin
Habitats
Giraffes can inhabit savannas, grasslands or open woodlands.
Most giraffes live either in East Africa or in Angola and Zambia in southwestern Africa.
Population
Up to four species, and five subspecies
Two former subspecies
There are an estimated 89,710 individuals of Giraffa in the wild.
Endangered??
Most giraffe species are currently endangered.
There were an estimated 140,000 giraffes in African in 1999.
Declined to less than 80,000 giraffes today.
Jean Baptiste Lamarck
Mentor, Count George-Louis Leclerc de Buffon,
Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744-1829) making the first large advance toward modern evolutionary theory
Three stages of evolution.
Full transcript