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Plagiarism

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by

Mr. Bell

on 2 March 2016

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Transcript of Plagiarism

Finally
When in doubt, cite.
Remember that the consequences of plagiarizing in high school and college are serious and can derail your academic prospects.
Always approach your academics with integrity and sound decision making.
What is plagiarism?
Plagiarism
When do I cite?
Citing means that you give credit to the source where you found your information. As noted by OWL Purdue, you must cite when you...
Use “words or ideas presented in a magazine, book, newspaper, song, TV program, movie, Web page, computer program, letter, advertisement, or any other medium"
Include "information you gain through interviewing or conversing with another person, face to face, over the phone, or in writing"
"Copy the exact words or a unique phrase"
"Reprint any diagrams, illustrations, charts, pictures, or other visual materials"
What is paraphrasing?
Taking ideas from a website or from another person and putting them into your own words is paraphrasing. You must cite the original source or you will be plagiarizing.
What is direct copying?
Directly taking another person's words--be it entire passages or even a few phrases--without citing the source is plagiarism.
How do I cite?
For most classes, cite your sources using MLA style. To do this, note the author’s name or the source of the information as well as the page or paragraph number. At the end of the essay, provide a Works Cited page. Learn more: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
As stated on the OWL Purdue website, plagiarism is the “uncredited use (both intentional and unintentional) of somebody else's words or ideas.”

If you take someone's work or ideas, either by paraphrasing or directly copying, and you do not give that person credit, you are plagiarizing.

OWL Purdue Resources: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/02/
A brief introduction
Can I reuse previous essays I have written?
No. Recycling your own work, be it a paragraph or an entire essay, constitutes academic dishonesty. It misses the point of the assignment. If the assignment is so similar to a previous one, discuss this with your teacher so you can write about a new topic.
Do I cite everything?
No. As OWL Purdue notes, you don't need to cite when...

“Writing your own lived experiences, your own observations and insights, your own thoughts, and your own conclusions about a subject
…writing up your own results obtained through lab or field experiments
…you use your own artwork, digital photographs, video, audio, etc.
…using ‘common knowledge,’ things like folklore, common sense observations, myths, urban legends, and historical events (but not historical documents)
…using generally-accepted facts, e.g., pollution is bad for the environment…”
Where can I learn more?
OWL Purdue ("Is It Plagiarism Yet?"): http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/2/
OWL Purdue (MLA Citing): http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
MLA: http://www.mla.org/
Examples of proper citing include but are not limited to the following:
Beck notes, "There is no particular advantage in having each child say the same phrase at the end" (para 3).

Interestingly, "there is no particular advantage in having each child say the same phrase at the end" (Beck para 3).

Curiously, in Jarrell's poem, in the end, there is no real benefit in the children all saying the same thing (Beck para 3).
Original:
Because
women's wages often continue to reflect the

fiction
that men earn the family wage, single mothers rarely earn
enough to support themselves and their children
adequately.
And because work is still organized around
the assumption that mothers stay home with children
, even though few mothers can afford to do so, child-care facilities in the United States remain
woefully inadequate
.
Plagiarism:
Since
women's wages often continue to reflect the
mistaken notion
that men are the main wage earners in the family, single mothers rarely make
enough to support themselves and their children
very well
. Also, because work is still based on
the assumption that mothers stay home with children
, facilities for child care remain

woefully inadequate
in the United States.
Example of copying and pasting
Example from:
Fowler, James E. "Avoiding Plagiarism: A Student Survival Guide." Avoiding
Plagiarism: A Student Survival Guide. Mississippi State University, Apr.
2003. Web.
Original:
Because women's wages
often continue to reflect the fiction that men earn the family wage
,
single mothers rarely earn enough to support themselves and their children adequately
. And because work is still organized around the assumption that mothers stay home with children, even though few mothers can afford to do so,
child-care facilities in the United States remain woefully inadequate
.
Plagiarism:
By and large, our economy still operates on the
mistaken notion that men are the main breadwinners in the family
. Thus, women continue to earn lower wages than men. This means, in effect, that
many single mothers cannot earn a decent living
. Furthermore,
adequate day care is not available in the United States
because of the mistaken assumption that mothers remain at home with their children.
Example of paraphrasing that is not cited
Example from:
Fowler, James E. "Avoiding Plagiarism: A Student Survival Guide."
Avoiding Plagiarism: A Student Survival Guide. Mississippi
State University, Apr. 2003. Web.
What if I accidentally plagiarize?
It's still plagiarism. To avoid plagiarism, do your own work and avoid finding analysis on websites such as Sparknotes. And if you ever take ideas from the web or other places, you must cite them. When in doubt, cite.
"Welcome to the Purdue OWL." Purdue OWL: Avoiding Plagiarism.
Purdue University, n.d. Web. 18 July 2013.
"Welcome to the Purdue OWL." Purdue OWL: Avoiding Plagiarism.
Purdue University, n.d. Web. 18 July 2013.
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