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Victorian Era Social Classes

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by

Lisa Lee

on 21 August 2013

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Transcript of Victorian Era Social Classes

Upper Class
education
http://chriscross-thebooktrunk.blogspot.kr/2012/09/consequences-beware-of-spoilers.html
http://rodriguez9-3.pbworks.com/w/page/10300417/Fashion
http://flatworldknowledge.lardbucket.org/books/survey-of-british-literature-v0.1/section_07_01.html
"aristocracy"
Backgroun Qs
basic social classes in Victorian England?

similarities and differences between the classes?

Victorian men and women behavior in upper class society?

true gentleman defined?

men and women interaction?
Middle Class
- housework
- work in chores
- children in factories
- economy boooosters!
Sunken People
- People without jobs
- lived in poverty
Working Class
- no political power
by: Annie Na, Gloria Lee, and Lisa Lee
Society and Social Classes of
Victorian England

http://www.patrickthompsonforcongress.com/blog/life-in-a-dickens-novel-medicare-social-security
https://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/rschwart/ind_rev/rs/denault.htm
industrial laborers
farmers
servant
tailor
baker
banker
shopkeeper
merchant
bricklayer
clerks
ship-owner
mine owner
engineers
architects
Men and Women in Upper Class
Men
- educated at home by tutors
- sent to Eton, Harrow
- later sent to Oxford, Cambridge
Women
- never worked (even in home)
- socializing, shopping
- employed servants for working
True Gentlemen
- had to follow rules for introductions
- duty is always to his lady
- followed etiquette for dinner parties
Relationship Between Men and Women
- more formal than now

- generally socialized in communal gatherings (parties and dances)
http://taxidermy20thcentury.wordpress.com/2012/04/28/quirky-victorian-etiquette/
Bibliography
http://www.parafrasando.it/tesine/the-victorian-age.html
http://www.ehow.com/info_8477255_social-classes-victorian-period.html
http://www.slideshare.net/sstuckey/victorian-era-social-structure
http://www.victorianweb.org/history/Class.html
http://www.ehow.com/info_8477255_social-classes-victorian-period.html
http://womenineuropeanhistory.org/index.php?title=Dinner_Parties
Full transcript