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What is SOLO taxonomy?

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by

Laura Concar

on 2 September 2014

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Transcript of What is SOLO taxonomy?

Straight edge connections
tessellate hexagons
and explain the
links
SOLO Verbs
What is SOLO taxonomy?
What is

SOLO
?

S
tructure of the
O
bserved
L
earning
O
utcome
Overview
Using SOLO
in the
classroom
HOT maps
It provides a systematic way of assessing and evaluating the quality of a students answer. It was intended to look at output.

It looks at the structural complexity of the response
It can also be used as a language to support teachers and students with their learning
Pre structural
Uni structural
Multi structural
Relational
Extended abstract
How is SOLO different to Blooms?
Bloom's works on the assumption that there is a relationship between the questions asked and the responses to be elicited, whereas in the
SOLO
taxonomy both the
questions and the answers can be at differing levels
.
Bloom’s taxonomy is not accompanied by criteria for judging the outcome of the activity (Ennis, 1985), whereas
SOLO is explicitly useful for judging the outcomes
.
Unlike the Bloom taxonomy, which tends to be used more by teachers than by students, the
SOLO can be taught to students such that they can learn to write progressively more difficult answers
.
I know nothing
No structure to the answer
I know one thing about the topic
Yes or no answer

e.g.
What is a canine?
A type of tooth
Know
several
facts
Ask
qus
with
more
than one
answer
Have
several
ideas
Pre structural
Uni structural
Multi structural
Relational
Starting to link ideas
Why something
happens
Nearly making
predictions
Extended abstract
Using linked ideas and info and
generalise to a different
context
infer, predict
imagination
Hexagons
SOLO hexagons can be used to determine a student's depth of
prior knowledge

and understanding
before starting to learn.
Prompt to
increase and deepen understanding
To
create new understanding
by introducing hexagons with additional content
Brainstorm
Record
Arrange
Describe individual hexagons
Explore the node
where 3 meet or
generalise about the
natureof a cluster of
hexagons
Revision at end of topic
Elicit prior knowledge at start
Use an A4 grid to help with planning and structuring an
essay/extended answer
Biggs and Collis 1982
How characters in a book interact
Different coloured hexagons to show styles of writing/marking points
Learning Outcomes
Define
Describe
Sequence
Classify
Compare and contrast
Explain causes/effects
Analyse
Analogy
Predict
Evaluate
Generalise

Define
the geosphere on the Planet Earth

Sequence
the steps needed to rearrange a line equation to the form y=mx + c
Compare & contrast
two strategies for profit
maximisation.
Generalise
about the design of motorway onramps and
Pythagoras’ Theorum.

#solotaxonomy
Pam Hook @arti_choke
http://www.pamhook.com/mediawiki/images/9/99/SOLO_Taxonomy_LearningIntentionsEffectiveStrategiesSuccessCriteriaSelf_Assessment.pdf
students then create a spider web effect with string, physically linking points
students label the strings with
reasons for connections
students are grouped and write their ideas on one topic
students could then go on to predict or generalise based on this knowledge
Making links between ideas, topics, chapters, characters, subjects etc
Thinking hats
T
h
i
n
k
e
r
'
s

K
e
y
s
Learning outcomes show simple connections but importance not noted.

Learning outcomes show connections are made, but significance to overall meaning is missing.

cause and effect
compare and contrast
classify
sequence
Learning outcomes show full connections made, and synthesis of parts to the overall meaning
analogy
Learning outcomes go beyond subject and makes links to other concepts - generalises
generalise
predict
one idea
define
evaluate
create
describe
several ideas
Self and peer assessment
.pamhook.com
SOLO HOT maps work with prepared rubrics
Questioning
What is the idea about?
What is one important idea that you learned from this?
How does this idea apply to your life?
What does this make you wonder?
Why do you think this idea is important?
surface learning
deep learning
no knowledge
Using GCSE exam questions at KS3 to show relational and extended abstract understanding
Hinge point questions
Assessment for purpose
2nd September 2014
http://pamhook.com/free-resources/downloadable-resources/
Writing a more challenging question
What might a
student 'look like'
at each stage....?
Some connections made
Focus on several aspects
Some disorganization and alienation of related concepts
Significance of parts to whole is absent
Connections with other information and beyond
Generalization and abstraction of principles and
underlying assumptions
Transfer to new experiences and unexpected
problems
Useful blogs - worth taking a look at.....
http://invisiblelearning.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/solo-enquiry.html
http://chrisharte.typepad.com/learner_evolution_chris_h/2011/04/solo-im-ridin-solo.html
www.learningspy.co.uk/english-gcse/hexagonal-learning/


http://taitcoles.wordpress.com/solo-taxonomy/

How is a polar bear adapted to live in the Arctic?
It eats fish
It has white fur
It has white fur for camouflage and sharp claws to catch seals
No organization of information
No demonstrated understanding
Misses the point
No meaning
Connections between facts and theory
Understanding and integration of significance of parts to each other, and parts to whole
Able to apply to some problem situations
It has white fur for camouflage
against the snow

so it
cannot be seen by prey
. Therefore
more likely to catch food
. Bear has small ears to reduces amount of heat lost in the cold climate
Simple, obvious, connections made
Focused on one aspect
Information still has little meaning
Value and significance unclear
Concrete level
The polar is adapted in several ways to survive in the Arctic. The white fur provides camouflage against the snow allowing it to track and catch its prey. This adaptation would have come about by natural selection as it provided an advantage as
compared to a brown bear
that would not be camouflaged against the snow. The bears large paws spread the weight of the bear across a larger surface area so
reducing the pressure on the ice
. This would provide an advantage as the bear could
travel further across thinner ice to find food and mates to propagate its genes
.
http://www.debonogroup.com/six_thinking_hats.php
Can you describe?
Can you define?
Do you recognise?
Give 'one example'
What other key words/ connectives could you use?
What evidence could you use?
What is your view on?
How is this place changing?
What caused...
Can you give a reason why/for?
Can you explain..
What patterns can you see?
What is your view on?
What is the link/connection?
Can you compare/contrast
Can you analyse?
Can you justify?
What is your conclusion?
What will the consequence be?
What questions could we ask about?
Full transcript