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Using Textual Evidence When Responding to a Reading

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by

Chris Page

on 20 January 2015

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Transcript of Using Textual Evidence When Responding to a Reading

EXAMPLE
Using Textual Evidence When Responding to a Reading
1. Read the text closely multiple times
2. Highlight or take note of quotes that seem important to the author's argument.
3. Once you see the prompt, Figure out which quotes from the reading will be useful for explaining your position.
Whether you're agreeing or disagreeing with the author, you need to use quotes from the reading to explain why.
The same quote can be used to either agree or disagree with the author.
4. Put the quote into context.
Use signal phrases to let the audience know how the quote fits into your argument:
Just as the author argues,

Like the author claims,

I agree with the author's argument that, "..."

Although the author argues,

The authors claims, "..." However,

While the author writes that "..." my own experience is...

Agree
Disagree
Example of a longer quote
:
As Barry states, "I was lucky. I had Mrs. LeSane. I had Mr. Gunderson. I had an abundance of art supplies. And I had a particular brand of neglect in my home that allowed me to slip away and get to them. But what about the rest of the kids who weren't as lucky?"
Example of using less of the quote:
Barry reflects that her school offered an escape for her but asks, "[W]hat about the rest of the kids who weren't as lucky?"
Example of paraphrasing the idea of the quote:
Barry uses her own experiences as a child and the way school provided a safe haven for her to ask what happens to other children who don't have these kinds of resources.
Whether you're using a longer quote, a shorter quote, or you are paraphrasing, make sure you are forming a clear, complete sentence.
I agree with Barry that "I was lucky. I had Mrs. LeSane. I had Mr. Gunderson. I had an abundance of art supplies. And I had a particular brand of neglect in my home that allowed me to slip away and get to them. But what about the rest of the kids who weren't as lucky?"
Now it's up to you to explain how this quote relates to the point you're arguing
and also make connections to your own observations and experiences
It is reasonable and necessary for schools to provide a sanctuary for troubled children such as Barry, and this is why the government needs to prioritize spending on education. Barry makes it very clear that her emotional needs weren’t being met at home. She reflects that her school offered an escape for her but asks,
“[W]hat about the rest of the kids who weren’t as lucky?”
This is an important question, and if schools won't or, because of budget cuts, aren't able to provide a sanctuary like Barry found, many children will be left with anywhere to go. My cousin, Andy, was one of those kids who “wasn’t as lucky” as Barry. His parents, like Barry’s, were under intense financial pressures, and he was often ignored and neglected. However, unlike Barry, he did not have a school that was able to offer him a sanctuary. His school was grossly underfunded, and all of the arts and sports programs were cut. He found a place that he felt he belonged in a group of friends who did drugs instead. He has been caught using and selling drugs and has been in and out of jail for years and is still struggling to find purpose in his life. There is no telling how much money has been spent on him in the prison system, but I do know that money would have been better spent early in his life on his education. And like Barry asks an important question, I would ask, how many children like Andy are we failing now, and what will become of them in the future?
Can you see problem in the quote below? What makes this unclear?
Options for Quoting/Paraphrasing
Full transcript