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Decision-Making

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Sharon Thompsonowak

on 16 July 2014

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Transcript of Decision-Making

Getting Where You Want to Go
Decision-Making
"When making a
decision of minor importance
, I have always found it advantageous to consider all the pros and cons.
In vital matters
, however, such as the choice of a mate or a profession, the decision should come from the unconscious, from somewhere within ourselves. In the important decisions of personal life, we should be governed, I think,
by the deep inner needs of our nature
." - Sigmund Freud
Mapping the Decision-Making Environment
Shift Your Attitude


Practice Creativity



Engage in Competition


Prepare
Overcoming Barriers
Goal
The Decision- Making Process
Starting the decision-making
process implies
Choosing to Choose
The "right" choice
is defined by
who you are and
where you want to go.
that you
can & will
make a decision.

1. Identify and choose
alternatives
.

2. Reduce
doubt
to allow a reasonable choice.
What do we do when making a decision?
Two Kinds of Decisions
- Either/or
- Decisions made in
advance

- Yes/No
- Either/Or
- Pros/Cons
Dependent Decisions
Decisions Which
- Being prepared for
the right moment
- Flexible
Decision-making
moves back & forth
between
what we want
and
the
options

we have.
Often the possibilities we identify
will influence the criteria we have.

- Follows from previous decisions
- Enables many future decisions
- Prevents other future decisions
A decision left unmade
will often result in
a decision by default or
a decision being made for you.
Decisions are made in real time with the best
information

available at the moment.
The goal of making a decision
(instead of letting others decide for you) is to understand and minimize risk.
Determine the options that are available. Remember that options are
- Time-sensitive
- Dependent on past decisions

Identify barriers to developing options
- Individual abilities & preferences
- Community culture & norms

Strategize how barriers can be overcome
- Take ownership of the process
- Practice creativity
Finding Options
- Identify sources of information

- Determine how important each piece of information is
Two Kinds of Information
Primary
: information that
y
ou gather yourself

Secondary
: usable information
g
athered by someone else
How much info do you need?
- Too much or too little information can make the process more difficult

- The amount of information needed is tied to the
risk
involved in the decision
Understanding Barriers
Emotional

Environmental

Perceptual


Intellectual

Cultural

Expressive
Fear of making mistakes; need for security; impatience

Distractions; lack of cooperation from others

Seeing what we expect to see; skipping the process of defining a problem so we can get to the "important" part of solving it

Inexperience; being locked into a bad approach

Traditions; distrust of intuition; conformist behavior

Expressing ideas in a way that is not understood by others
Acknowledge barriers. Recognize that you have the resources to overcome them.


Try brain teasers & puzzles. Walk a different route to the grocery store. Practice looking at old things in new ways.



Join a team. Play games. Debate an issue. Enter writing or photography contests.


Get enough rest and eat properly so you can think clearly. Pace yourself. Practice decision-making ahead of time so you'll be prepared when the moment comes.
Gathering Information
Goals

Values

Information

Alternatives

Criteria

Preferences
What do you want to accomplish?

How well does an option support your core commitments?

What facts do you need about your options?

What options do you need to find or create?

What characteristics must an option have?

How do you rank your options?
Accept the Decision
To implement a decision, you must accept it intellectually and emotionally.
Understanding Risk
Risk-taking frees us. Without risk, we cannot grow.

Risks remind us that permanent security does not exist. Not taking a risk does not guarantee security.

Fear of loss, rejection, or failure is a normal part of risk.

Risk involves separation
anxiety as we move
away from the familiar.
Assessing Risk
1. Will this risk help you reach
your goals?

2. Are you calm and thoughtful?

3. What are the possible losses as
well as gains?

4. Do you have a plan with clear
steps?

5. Are you ready to act decisively?

6. Are you prepared to accept a
mix of success and failure?
Risks vs. Barriers
in Decision-Making
Every decision:
Risk Barriers
Exposure to the
chance
of injury, loss, or failure
Anything that
restrains or obstructs
progress or access
Finding Options
- Brainstorm

-Reverse
solutions

- 5 Whys
S
pecific
M
easurable
A
ction-oriented
R
ealistic
T
ime-bound
The purpose toward which efforts are directed.
Why should we set goals?
affect our:
- Choices
- Energy
- Commitment
- Thinking

Choices
Goals help us focus
our attention and
actions. Goals help us
see how small choices
connect to a larger purpose.
Energy
Goals can
energize
us. For example, if you apply for 10 jobs/week and have the goal of applying for 20, you will work more intensely than you would otherwise.
Commitment
You are more likely to push through setbacks if pursuing a goal.
Thinking
Goals can help us shift our behaviors and develop our understanding of the world.

depends on action.
Action leads to momentum.
S
pecific:
I want to get a job.
vs.
I want to get a
career-ladder job as a healthcare professional.
M
easurable:
I want to save money.
vs.
I want to save $3,000.
A
ction-oriented:
Be more involved at my child's school.
vs.
Attend 2 PTA meetings this semester.
Qualify for the Olympics.
vs.
Train
for a 5k.
R
ealistic:
T
ime-based:
I want to save $3,000.
vs.
I want to save $3,000 this year.
Exercise: Turning Goals into Actions
1. Create clear, specific tasks.
2. Set daily, weekly, and monthly tasks.
3. Review your goals and tasks
regularly.
4. Get started immediately: do one thing
within 72 hours that will help you
reach your goal.
Decision-making:
Navigating everyday situations with the end goal in mind.
The greatest challenge to
decision-making is
uncertainty
.
What is a goal?
Goal-Setting Exercise:
I want to
Be/Do/Have
Exercise:

Making Decisions with Real Information
• Don’t judge or evaluate ideas; you’ll review them
later.
• Don’t write complete words or sentences if that
slows you down.
• Don’t worry too much about repeating entries;
duplicates can shed light on your patterns of
thought.
• Consider many areas of your life: career, family,
health, education, travel, recreation, community service,
character, etc.


Be/Do/Have Guidelines:
Decision-Making Style 1:
The Maximizer
Decision-Making Style 2:
The Satisficer
Full transcript