Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Main Idea and Details

No description
by

Keenya Calvin

on 20 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Main Idea and Details

Get to the point! Main idea and Details Is the whole point of reading! Purpose of Main Idea Main Idea + Details Authors want to tell you all about their ideas.
The authors share a lot of information in text.

Authors think of their main idea and then write all of the other sentences around that main idea. Think about this. The entire passage or article has one main idea.

Each section of a nonfiction text usually has a new main idea too that relates to the main idea of the entire writing. Nonfiction Text Main Idea Authors write focused on one topic or idea.

They write about facts, opinions, and examples (details) to support their main idea. Life or Death?
Order or Confusion? The main idea is the heart of the writing. (metaphor :-).

Your heart runs your body and without it you wouldn't exist.

Without a main idea, a fiction or non fiction piece would be a jumbled mess of words and sentences. Fiction
Main Idea Question Stems What events from the passage show that Michael is wrong when he says "table" tennis isn't as physical as basketball?"

Based on the passage, what most likely will happen in the future?

What sentence best summarizes...?
(Remember summaries address MOST of section of text not just a sentence or two.)

If this article were published in a newspaper, which headline expresses the main idea? Did I forget to tell you to check text features! 1. Did the author tell me what to learn or does the author think I'm smart enough to figure out the main idea?
2. About what is this mostly?
3. Why did the author write this?
4. What should I be learning?
5. Are there repeated words or phrases? Finding the main idea and details in nonfiction text is a little different.

Sometimes the author tells you the main idea in a sentence in paragraph. (Which sentence tells what the passage is about?)

Other times, the author wants you to figure it out for yourself.


HOW????? Don't forget about the text features the author uses!!!!
title
subtitle
headings
subheadings
graphs
charts
pictures
timeline
diagrams
captions ASK YOURSELF? FICTION The author writes a story around 3 main things that make up the details that support the main idea.

It's the whole meaning of the plot. (setting, characters, problem and solution)

Creating a main idea means putting all of the major details in the story into one sentence. details about characters details about setting and major events Summarizing Fiction After one or two paragraphs you should summarize the text.

This helps you keep track of what important details the author wants you to remember!

Also, it makes sure that you keep the events IN ORDER of how they happen in the text. Who - Did what- Where - When - Why Let's practice using the fable "The Panther and the Heron."
We'll summarize each main event of the story and then come up with the main idea of the creating by using a summary statement. Nonfiction Text WRITE THESE QUESTIONS DOWN IN YOUR NOTEBOOK! Let's practice with a nonfiction with the article "Florida Kids Make a Difference". Think about how you would explain what you read to a friend. Learning Goal: I can determine the main idea (stated or implied) of a text through paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying the relevant details in fiction and nonfiction text. (LA.6.1.7.3) 1. I can define or recall definitions or examples of the following words:
main idea, relevant details, topic, summarizing, summary statement, paraphrasing, detail, irrelevant detail, and support.

2. I can identify main idea (stated or implied) while reading grade-level text. I can do this by:
a. Knowing why we should stop every few paragraphs
b. Locating relevant details
c. Asking questions as I read
d. I can identify and locate text features

3. I can identify main idea (stated or implied) while reading grade-level text. I can do this by:
a. Can track understanding of text by summarizing every few paragraphs in a passage
b. Locating relevant details and disregarding irrelevant details
c. Understands the difference between how to find main idea in fiction and nonfiction
d. Knowing the difference between a summary statement and main idea.
e. I can analyze (look closer to learn additional information) text features and use them to assist in determine relevant details and creating a main idea

4. I can create a research paper that has a main idea (stated or implied) and many relevant details to include in a magazine article about the modern and ancient Olympics including various forms of text features. Based on what you know, how would you explain to someone how to find the main idea in nonfiction? How would you justify your choice in a main idea? What information would you need to support your main idea? 1. I can define or recall definitions or examples of the following words:
main idea, relevant details, summarizing, summary statement, paraphrasing, detail, fiction, and support.

2. I can identify main idea (stated or implied) while reading grade-level text. I can do this by:
a. Knowing why we should stop every few paragraphs
b. Locating relevant details (character, setting, problem and how it was solved.)
c. Asking questions as I read

3. I can identify main idea (stated or implied) while reading grade-level text. I can do this by:
a. Can track understanding of text by summarizing every few paragraphs in a passage. Who did what, when, where, why, and how (sometimes present)
b. Locating relevant details and disregarding irrelevant details
c. Understands how to find main idea in fiction

4. I can create a research paper that is a narrative of a fictional experience in the Olympic Games with characters, a setting, problem, and solution. The events should reflect rising action and a climax. Learning Goal: I can determine the main idea (stated or implied) of a text through paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying the relevant details in fiction and nonfiction text. (LA.6.1.7.3) Irrelevant Details in Fiction *That's tricky! In the three little pigs does it matter what color their pants where?
*Does it matter that there were three pigs?
*Does it matter that there were 3 houses?
*Does it matter how old the wolf was?
*Does it matter that they lived in the houses? Relevant Details Relevant details have a HUGE impact on the behaviors of the characters as they solve the conflict and move towards the solution.

*Think what is the BIGGEST conflict in the text? The relevant details deal with that!

*Think, if this "detail changed" would it change what happens in the story? Somebody(character)
Wanted (goal or desire)
Something (conflict)
So (problem)

Wolf wanted to eat the pigs so they escaped to the brick house and cooked the wolf after he came down the chimney.

characters:
setting:
problem:
solution: Two Ways to Find Main Idea Find the Main Idea of
"I Can't go to School Today"
by Shel Silverstein Let's TP-CASTT this fiction poem. characters:
setting:
problem:
solution:

or

Somebody(character)
Wanted (goal or desire)
Something (conflict)
So (problem) TITLE - Read the title.
Now what can you predict?

PARAPHRASE - Write in your own words exactly what happened in the poem.
Your paraphrase should have exactly the same number of lines as the poem.
(Just paraphrase the italized stanzas this time.)

CONNOTATION - Look for: imagery, figures of speech, similes, metaphors, personification, symbolism, onomatopoeias, alliteration, rhyme, as well as diction and point of view.
Now: How do these devices help you draw conclusions about the poem?

ATTITUDE - Remember: multiple attitudes may be present in a poem.
Examine: diction, images, detail, and tone (see list)
Tone or attitude cannot be named with a single word.
Think complexity!

SHIFTS - How does the author’s perspective or insight change?
Look for: Key words (but, yet, however, although), punctuation, stanza divisions, changes in line or stanza length, irony, changes in diction, changes in sound

TITLE - Look at the title again.
What new insight can you gain from the title?

THEME - What is the poem saying about the human experience, motivation, or condition?
What subject or subjects does the poem address?
What did you learn about these subjects?
What does the poet want you to take away for this poem? Now let's write a main idea/summary statement for the entire poem. 1. Who/What is the passage mostly about? (topic or subject)
2. What is important about the topic or subject?
3. When does this take place?
4. Where does this take place?
5. Why is the topic or subject important?/How does this occur? Main Idea Nonfiction
HIGH FIVE!
Full transcript