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Sonnet 73 by Shakespeare

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Amelia Ball

on 12 February 2014

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Transcript of Sonnet 73 by Shakespeare

"Sonnet 73" by Shakespeare
Background
Idea 1
Time, Shakespeare is scared of aging. He wants to believe that this is just a cycle. This creates the theme that death emphasizes the harshness and emptiness of old age.
Idea 2
"In me thou seest the twilight of such day
As if sunset fadeith in the west,
which by and by night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up the rest."
Idea 3
"In me thou seest the glowwing of such fire.
That on the ashes of s youth doth lie,
As death-bed whereon it must expire
Consumed by which it was nourish'd by."
Theme
LIfe is not a cycle, it has a start and it has an end, like a fire. All that we can control is what we put into it. Whether that is happiness or despair, that is only what we can control.
Sonnets
"This thou percevest, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long." (13-14)
Summary
Connotation
That time of year thou may'st in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see'st the twilight of such day,
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by-and-by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire
Consum'd with that which it was nourish'd by.
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

- Born 1564, died 1616 at age 52
- Estamating that he wrote this sonnet around the age of 46 (Which was considered old)
- Created the English laugauge that we use today, a lot of the worlds we know now weren't used back then.
- was most known as a poet, actor and play write.
Metaphors
"Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang." (4)
Metaphors and Images collide!
"Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self that seals up the rest" (7-8)
"That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by." (10&11)
Imagery
" ... mayest in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, of few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold." (1-3)
"In me thou seest the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west." (6-7)
The choir used to be surrounded by a forest, coloured with stained glass and painting like flowers and leaves in the chapel but they now abandoned by all but the grey walls coloured like the skies of winter.
Death is like the darkness that comes after twilight. The words "by and by" is the same as saying "always" so it is to be expected. Darkness and death always come, and he can avoid the fading of his youth.
Your life is like a fire, you put in as much wood as you can and the flame (life) takes in a burns it. Shakespeare was able to create this idea that soon his fire will be consumed by which it was nourished by. That the ashes will out weight the fire and the flame will have to go out.
This emphasizes the image of the harshness and emptiness of old age.
He sees hope, light, an image of himself that could rise. And you see this again when he talks about the fire
Rhyme scheme: ABAB CDCD EFEF GG
Image of Love out lasting the cycle of life and death.
Shakespeare asks himself and whom ever he addresses to love more and to love strong.
Nothing is going to stop him from dying so nothing should stop him from living.
We must all hope that our ashes are full of happiness and love when they take us over.
Personification
"Upon those boughs, which shake against the cold," (3)
Branches, or boughs in this case, are able to blow with the wind, but Shakespeare incorporates personification by using "shake" instead almost saying they tremble in anticipation of cold days to come. Also the word "against" is used in the sense of 'in anticipation of, in preparation for' in Sonnets 49 and 63, so we can assume this are related to not only the tress becoming cold and dying, but also himself.
"In me thou seest the twilight of such day
In me thou seest the glowing of such fire" (5&9)
Instead of making the object personify the actions of a person, Shakespeare is able to use personification and turn himself into nature. Almost relating death into a cycle...
In the first quatrain, he mentions his age by saying it is that “time of year,” late autumn, when the leaves have almost completely fallen from the trees. There is no more beauty or song from the birds ether and he is upset by this because it emphasizes the harshness and emptiness of old age.

In the second quatrain, he continues with the cycle idea his age is like twilight, “As after sunset fadeth in the west,” and the remaining light is leaving, he then mentions this being "Death’s second self.” which is the dark.

Then recognizing this constant metaphor of death being a cycle Shakespeare compares himself to the glowing remnants of a fire, which lies “on the ashes of his youth” which will soon be consumed “by that which it was nourished by” which was what was created by the burning of the fire itself. Recognizing that he will be gone soon.

Finally with all of this in mind he says in the couplet to his love, that he wished he knew more, more about love and life. He gives the reader advice to "(make) thy love more strong, To love that well".
This sonnet is written in iambic pentameter and is a Shakespearean sonnet. Usually, this means that the poet is having to figure out a question or idea in the first 3 quatrains and then creates an answer to his question in the last couplet.

Usually you analyze sonnets 71-74 all toghther, because they all have the same theme: love and aging
"That time of year thou mayist n me behold
When yellow leaves or none, or few do hang.
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin'd choirs where late the sweet birds sang."
This is another cycle, but this time addressing almost a hope. An idea that he can see a glowing at the end of the tunnel, or sunset in this case, and that there can be another sunrise later. This creates the theme of raging against the darkness that is sleep. To hope that there will be another sunrise.
This is Shakespeare's realization that death is not a cycle, instead it is like a fire. He must recognize that he has been putting wood into this fire and soon the ashes will be what consumes him and causes him to die.
- Ms. S. Daly, English Literature 12, Classroom., Jan. 2014
- Shmoop Editorial Team. "Sonnet 73 Theme of Time." Shmoop.com. Shmoop University, Inc., 11 Nov. 2008. Web. Feb. 2014.
- Shakespeares Sonnets Editorial Team. "Sonnet 73." shakespeares-sonnets.com. Oxquarry Books, Ltd., Copyright 2001-2011. Web. Feb. 2014
- Ms. Miller, English 12, Classroom., Feb. 2014

Works Cited
Connotation
Symbols
"That time of year" (1)
"In me thou seest the glowing of such fire," (9)
Both the words "year" and "fire" are symbols of Shakespeares life. This is also expanded further into the metaphor of life and death.
"...twilight of such day" (5)
"...sunset fadeth in the west" (6)
"...by and by black night..." (8)
All of these uses of time of day, sunset and rising,
they are symbols of the cycle (in Shakespeare's mind) of life. How soon death (darkness) will take over again the sun (light) that was life.
Assonance
"Upon those boughs..."(2)
These all have the same vowel sounds,
This gives us the idea of what Shakespeare was feeling. the smooth and rythmic sounds of the "O" allow us to feel the coldness in air of his life.
"....sweet birds sang"(4)
The birds sweet sang is an alteration that creates a sound that you can connect to birds singing.
Alteration
Full transcript