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20th Century Jazz

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by

Kathleen Kastner

on 29 April 2016

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Transcript of 20th Century Jazz

Century Music
20th
Ragtime
New Orleans
Dixieland
Boogie-woogie
Swing/
Big Band
J A Z Z
American art form
Jazz interpretation
Emphasis on rhythm
Improvisation
Forms unique to jazz:
Blues
16 or 32 measure forms
NEW ORLEANS DIXIELAND
The music that first came to be called "jazz."

Trumpet, Clarinet, Trombone,


Banjo, Tuba, Drums (piano added later)
CHICAGO DIXIELAND
Trumpet, Clarinet, Trombone, Tenor Sax,
Piano, Guitar, String Bass, Drums
BOOGIE-WOOGIE

Percussive Blues Piano style:
an ostinato bass figure juxtaposed with
a succession of right-hand figures
RAGTIME
Piano style: right-hand accents &
syncopations over a 2/4 oom-pa
bass line. Scott Joplin, James
Scott, Tom Turpin, Joseph Lamb
SWING/BIG BAND
intersected with popular music

Trumpet section
Trombone section
Saxophone section
Rhythm section
Swing also heard in smaller combos
J A Z Z
Scott Joplin: Maple Leaf Rag
Original piano roll - 1916
Blues
Bessie Smith
Lost Your Head Blues
Jelly Roll Morton
Maple Leaf Rag
transformation
Dippermouth Blues, 1923
King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band

King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band:
Joe Oliver "King" cornet, leader
Louis Armstrong, cornet
Honore Dutrey, trombone
Johnny Dodds, clarinet
Lil Hardin, piano
Bud Scott, banjo
Baby Dodds, drums

Struttin' With Some Barbeque
Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five
(a studio band), 1927
1927 Hot Five members:
Louis Armstrong, cornet
Lil Hardin Armstrong, piano
Kid Ory, trombone
Johnny Dodds, clarinet
Johnny St. Cyr, guitar, banjo
I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues
Louis Armstrong & his Orchestra, 1933
Honkey Tonk Train
Meade "Lux" Lewis, 1937
Body and Soul
Benny Goodman Trio, 1935
The Man I Love (Gershwin)
Coleman Hawkins Swing Four
Ko-Ko
Duke Ellington & His Orchestra, 1943
Benny Goodman Trio:
Benny Goodman, clarinet
Teddy Wilson, piano
Gene Krupa, drums
Coleman Hawkins Swing Four
Coleman Hawkins, tenor sax
Eddie Heywood, piano
Oscar Pettiford, bass
Shelly Manne, drums
Basic Blues:
Bebop
Jazz of the 50's
Progressive Jazz
of the 60's

Jazz of the 70's
Dizzy Gillespie:
"Salt Peanuts"
Modern Jazz Quartet:
Django, 1973 version
Modern Jazz Quartet:
Django, late-80's
Miles Davis: So What
with John Coltrane
Chick Corea & Gary Burton:
Crystal Silence
Chick Corea & Gary Burton:
La Fiesta
Weather Report:
Umbrellas
Woody Herman and His Herd:
"Your Father's Moustache"
Miles Davis & His Orchestra:
"Boplicity"
Lennie Tristano Trio:
"All the Things You Are"
Charlie Parker
"Koko"
Bebop:

rebellion against swing
small combos: 3-6 players, no written music;

creative harmonic & rhythmic developments;
unexpected accents; often fast tempos; jagged
instrumental lines; technically challenging;
abrupt endings....
Jazz of the 50's:

a proliferation of styles:

Varieties of swing styles
Varied bebop schools
Cool Jazz
Progressive Jazz of the 60's:

Free in form and improvisation
Relaxed rhythmic feel
Increased dissonance
Jazz of the 70's:

Diverse trends
Move toward a fusion of styles
Use of electronics
Don Ellis & His Orchestra:
Live at the Fillmore
"Hey Jude"
Chicago
Dixieland
Full transcript