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reasons for the Seasons

Julianna,Clairex2
by

Julianna Schaffer

on 9 April 2014

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Transcript of reasons for the Seasons

Reasons for the Seasons
Summer solstice
Vernal Equinox
What are seasons?
Seasons are each of the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) marked by particular weather patterns and daylight hours, resulting from the earth's changing position with regard to the sun.
Whats are the causes of seasons?
We have seasons because the earth takes a year to move round the sun, which gives us light and warmth, and because the earth tilts at an angle of 23.5 degrees. In Winter we tilt away from the sun and in the summer we tilt further towards the sun. However, on the first day of spring the sun shines equally on both the north and south hemispheres of the Earth.
Winter Solstice
Simulation
Need one sun
8 people willing to make up Earth
Quiz time!
Question #1
Question #2
Question #3
Question #4
Question #5
Question #6
Question #7
Question #8
Question #9
Question #10
Thanks for watching!
Hope you learned something interesting
by:
Julianna Schaffer, Claire Magee & Claire Kennedy
What degree is Earths axis tilted at?
23.5 degrees
Name the four seasons
Summer
Spring
Winter
Fall
During spring, the axis of the Earth is increasing its tilt relative to the Sun, and the length of daylight rapidly increases for the relevant hemisphere. The hemisphere begins to warm significantly causing new plant growth to "spring forth," giving the season its name. Snow, if a normal part of winter, begins to melt, and streams swell with runoff. Frosts, if a normal part of winter, become less severe. In climates that have no snow and rare frosts, the air and ground temperatures increase more rapidly. Many flowering plants bloom this time of year, in a long succession sometimes beginning when snow is still on the ground, continuing into early summer. In normally snowless areas "spring" may begin as early as February (Northern Hemisphere) heralded by the blooming of deciduous magnolias, cherries and quince, or August (Southern Hemisphere) in the same way. Many temperate areas have a dry spring, and wet autumn (fall), which brings about flowering in this season more consistent with the need for water as well as warmth. Subarctic areas may not experience "spring" at all until May or even June.

While spring is a result of the warmth caused by the changing orientation of the Earth's axis relative to the Sun, the weather in many parts of the world is overlain by events which appear very erratic taken on a year-to-year basis. The rainfall in spring (or any season) follows trends more related to longer cycles or events created by ocean currents and ocean temperatures. Good and well-researched examples are the El Niño effect and the Southern Oscillation Index.

Unstable weather may more often occur during spring, when warm air begins on occasions to invade from lower latitudes, while cold air is still pushing on occasions from the Polar regions. Flooding is also most common in and near mountainous areas during this time of year because of snowmelt, accelerated by warm rains. In the United States, Tornado Alley is most active this time of year, especially since the Rocky Mountains prevent the surging hot and cold air masses from spreading eastward and instead force them into direct conflict. Besides tornadoes, supercell thunderstorms can also produce dangerously large hail and very high winds, for which a severe thunderstorm warning or tornado warning is usually issued. Even more so than in winter, the jet streams play an important role in unstable and severe weather in the springtime in the Northern Hemisphere.

In recent decades season creep has been observed, which means that many phenological signs of spring are occurring earlier in many regions by a couple of days per decade.

Spring is seen as a time of growth, renewal, of new life (both plant and animal) being born. The term is also used more generally as a metaphor for the start of better times, as in the Prague Spring. Spring in the Southern Hemisphere is different in several significant ways to that of the Northern Hemisphere. This is because: there is no land bridge between Southern Hemisphere countries and the Antarctic zone capable of bringing in cold air without the temperature-mitigating effects of extensive tracts of water; the vastly greater amount of ocean in the Southern Hemisphere at all latitudes; at this time in Earth's geologic history the Earth has an orbit which brings it in closer to the Southern Hemisphere for its warmer seasons; there is a circumpolar flow of air (the roaring 40s and 50s) uninterrupted by large land masses; no equivalent jet streams; and the peculiarities of the reversing ocean currents in the Pacific.
Did you know?

A common misconception is that seasons depend on the distance between the Earth and the Sun but if that was true we would have summer at the same time as Australia and does that happen? The answer is obviously no, Earth's seasons are all based on the tilt of the axis and the rotation of the Earth.
Fun Fact
Earth's orbit around the sun isn't a perfect circle like most diagrams show!
June 21
Summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere
winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere
Around June 21
there are 24 hours of daylight north of the Arctic Circle this is also the
longest day of the year!

The sun's rays are directly overhead along the Tropic of Cancer on June 21.
When summer occurs in a hemisphere, it is due to that hemisphere receiving more direct rays of the sun than the opposite hemisphere where it is winter.
In normally snowless areas "spring" may begin as early as February (Northern Hemisphere) heralded by the blooming of deciduous magnolias, cherries and quince, or August (Southern Hemisphere) in the same way. Many temperate areas have a dry spring, and wet autumn (fall), which brings about flowering in this season more consistent with the need for water as well as warmth. Subarctic areas may not experience "spring" at all until May or even June.

Spring is seen as a time of growth, renewal, of new life (both plant and animal) being born. The term is also used more generally as a metaphor for the start of better times, as in the Prague Spring. Spring in the Southern Hemisphere is different in several significant ways to that of the Northern Hemisphere. This is because: there is no land bridge between Southern Hemisphere countries and the Antarctic zone capable of bringing in cold air without the temperature-mitigating effects of extensive tracts of water; the vastly greater amount of ocean in the Southern Hemisphere at all latitudes; at this time in Earth's geologic history the Earth has an orbit which brings it in closer to the Southern Hemisphere for its warmer seasons.
What day is the summer solstice?
June 21
What shape is Earths orbit around the sun?
An oval, not a perfect circle
In Vernal Equinox in the Northern hemisphere what hemisphere gets more sun?
March 21
Spring in the Northern Hemisphere
Autumn in the southern
Northern hemisphere but, they are almost equal
How many miles is the Earth from the sun in January?
91 million miles
THE SEASONS ARE REVERSED IN THE NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE
If its Summer in the Northern Hemisphere what is it in the Southern Hemisphere?
Winter
Autumnal equinox
September 23
Autumn in the northern hemisphere
Spring in the southern hemisphere

December 22
Winter solstice in the northern hemisphere
Summer solstice in the southern hemisphere
What is the longest day of the year?
Summer Solstice
about June 21
What is the main cause for Earth's seasons?
Earth's tilt on its axis and the Earth's orbit around the sun
What would happen if seasons depended on how far away you are from the sun?
We would have the same seasons as Australia, Everyone in the world will always be in the same season.
How do seasons affect life on earth?

For a brief period, days and nights around the world each last close to 12 hours. Then, as the Earth continues its path around the sun, days become shorter and nights lengthen, with the change becoming more pronounced in the higher latitudes, but remaining nonexistent at the equator.
This change in the amount of light is a signal to animals, plants and, before the light bulb, people, of changing seasons. It can have a profound effect on their biology, particularly on reproduction, which must be carefully timed.
Without Seasons, no plants would ever blossom and grow without Spring and Summer including trees, which is oxygen for humans and animals. Nothing would be able to live on earth, there would be no earth at all.
Full transcript