Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Holocaust and Nazi Propaganda

No description
by

Jon Tully

on 4 September 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Holocaust and Nazi Propaganda

The Holocaust and Nazi Propaganda
How did the Holocaust happen?
War reparations broke the country.
Trade embargoes held money from coming in.
Extreme poverty of Germans made them want answers.
Helplessness made them desire a scapegoat: someone to blame.
Wealth of many German Jews made them a prime target.

How did Hitler become so powerful?
Made himself a martyr
Played upon nation's hatred of foreigners
Convinced Germans that there was something unique and powerful about them (Aryan Race)
How could the Jews allow this?
How did it start?
It started slowly with the registration of all Jews.
Then it progressed to property registration.
The Nazi Party then had a list of all Jews, where they lived, and what they owned.
Hitler began limiting civil rights; anyone who spoke out against it was killed.
Post-WWI
How could the Germans allow this?
Hitler had to seize control of the educational system and the media.
He formed the Hitler Youth Party so that he could brainwash young children.
Once in full control, the Nazi party began to print articles full of propaganda, even giving them to schools.
Translation: Jews--Inciter of war, prolonger of war.
Translation: “Our answer: Pick up your arms and fight!"
Translation: “This genetically ill person will cost our people’s community 60,000 marks over his lifetime. Citizens, that is your money. Read Neues Volk, the monthly of the racial policy office of the NSDAP.”
Next target?
Once the Nazis had successfully began rounding up Jews, they also extended their reach to others who disagreed with their philosophy or were seen as a threat to their government.

Among those found in the camps were:
Jews (6 M)
Soviet POWs (2-3 M)
Poles (750,000- 1M)
Gypsies (up to 500,000)
Handicapped (200-250,000)
Gays (100,000 targeted, no number known for deaths)
Others (including political dissidents)
Propaganda is a form of communication that is aimed at influencing the attitude of a community toward some cause or position for self-benefit.
What is Propaganda?
Name Calling
Device which gives “bad names” to individuals, groups, nations, races, or beliefs.

Hitler blamed the Jews, calling them a “plague” and “parasites.”
Glittering Generalities
Device which a propagandist uses to give his beliefs “virtue words.”
In other words, he or she makes the belief sound good.
To convince people to hate others based on race, the party produced “scientific research.”

Such research was found in articles such as “Genetics and Racial Science.”

Since people respect the study of science, they respected the Nazi idea that racial hate was justified based upon science.
To appeal to religious ideas, Hitler’s party claimed that Christianity supported racism and published articles such as “The Holy Hate.”

Such titles made hatred sound acceptable.
Transfer
This device transfers the propagandist’s idea onto a respected, “good” institution.

Transfer often uses symbols.
Translation:“Support the assistance program for mothers and children.”
Testimonials
The device used when “important” people support the propagandist.

Advertisers use this device all the time.
Plain Folk
Politicians, labor leaders, ministers, etc. use this device when they portray themselves as “just a regular ole person.”

Candidates running for office will often appear in regular clothing with their families to look just like everyone else.

This device makes the propagandist appear trustworthy.
Translate: District Council meeting
Card Stacking
The propagandist uses this technique when he or she tells us only part of the truth, "stacking the deck" in their favor.

Also when benefit is stacked upon benefit to make the person seem without flaws.
Translate: “The Führer promised to motorize Germany. In 1932, 104,000 motor vehicles were manufactured, 33,000 people were employed, and goods with a total value of 295,000,000 marks were produced. In 1935, 353,000 vehicles were manufactured, Over 100,000 people were employed, and the value of goods produced was 1,150,000,000 marks. The Führer gave 250,000 people’s comrades jobs in the auto industry and its suppliers. German people: Thank the Führer on 29 March! Give him your vote!”
Bandwagon
This device tries to get you to follow the crowd.

It’s motto is, “Everybody’s doing it; it can’t be wrong.”
Translation: Yes! Fuhrer we will follow!
The propagandist uses all of these techniques and uses terrorism and control to achieve a purpose.
Always remember: “The government that is big enough to give you everything is strong enough to take it all away.”
Translation: "Bolshevism without a mask - large anti-Bolshevik exhibition of the NSDAP Gauleitung Berlin from November 6, 1937 to December 19, 1937 in the Reichstag building".
An ad aimed at occupied Holland showing what the US was "really like".
Your Turn!
Identify which persuasive devices are being used.
What is the implied meaning of each versus the stated meaning?
Take the knowledge you just learned and apply it to the following posters.
Full transcript