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Folklore: My Big Fat Greek Wedding

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Katie Landis

on 24 June 2011

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Transcript of Folklore: My Big Fat Greek Wedding

what are nice GREEK girls supposed to do? marry Greek boys make Greek babies and feed everyone until the day they die what do AMERICAN girls do? eat Wonder Bread sandwiches have blonde hair make fun of people who are different Toula and the Ugly Ducking DUCK What does the Ugly Duckling teach us? The general message I was taught was don't judge a book by it's cover Even though Hans Christian Andersen probably didn't mean for it to be interpretted as an example of racial discrimination and segregation, I think it does just that. Generally, the Ugly Duckling is a dark feathered bird (much like brown haired Toula) while the other ducks are light feathered (much like the blonde girls in the lunchroom). Food in
The Ugly Duckling Food is a privilege that the duck finds hard to come by A little girl who likes to kick the duck is also in charge of feeding him and the other birds Why does she do this? — Because he is different Food gives her the power to treat him as she will playing off of the saying "don't bite the hand that feeds you." DUCK TOULA Blondes Like the girl in the Ugly Duckling, the Blonde girl who talks with Toula has control over the feeding area (the lunchroom). She is clearly defined as the head of the table, not only litterally by positioning herself there, but also by setting the example for the other girls’ to laugh at Toula’s expense 3:00 The Bread is a symbol of their race as well as cleanliness Moussaka It is brown and associated with dirt, filth and is distasteful to the other girls It serves to show how Toula is different from the other girls and makes her an outsider Toula's parents control what she eats She wants to be like the other girls and eat Wonder Bread sandwiches Her parents make her food tye her to her Greek roots Even in a non-Greek setting she is set apart as Greek Food represents her parents' desire for her to be a traditional Greek girl This makes Toula an outcast amongst her peers She reaches a breaking point and eventually seeks to make a change She is accepted by the women once she starts acting and eating like an American Tula is stuck While she is still under her parent's influence, she is still an adolescent and it isn't until she seeks a means of independence that she starts breaking out of the adolescent development patterns "Yearning for peer approval in many areas of their lives, they behave in certain expected ways. By becoming an adequate member in the society of adolescents, a girl is prepared for the next step, that of entering successfully into the society of adults" Once she is accepted by the women at the lunch table, she has conformed to the American standard and has gained "peer approval" She is now ready to enter adulthood. This is much like the transformation that the Ugly Duckling experiences once he as also transformed. He is accepted amongst his fellow birds as Toula is accepted amongst her peers. 3:15 By choosing the American, white Wonder Bread, Toula chooses to take power in her own life It is during this point in the film we see her start to assert herself more amongst her family Toula is embracing American culture and distances herself from Greek food even further by leaving her father’s restaurant This is a pivotal moment in the movie where Toula separates herself from Greek food, and from her parents as well From now on, Toula keeps her power over food, not only for herself but for Ian as well
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