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Engineering

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by

A Jesse Coleman

on 22 August 2013

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Transcript of Engineering

... why don't these guys just build a bridge?!!?
... why don't these guys just build a bridge?!!?
... why don't these guys just build a bridge?!!?



Ye Olde
Engineering
Lab is HERE


.
You park HERE



Your 1st Class
is HERE



Warren Ave
Students Crossing Warren Ave
Average Class Size - 24 students
Classes run from 7:30am - 4:30pm
2 Classes (48 students) per hour in each direction
Over 800 crossings daily *
* Including instructors and random crossings not directly related to coming or going from classes
Majority of crossings occurring during downtown commute and lunch traffic

** National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
"On average, a pedestrian is killed in a traffic collision every 113 minutes and injured every eight minutes."
"Most pedestrian injuries occur between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m., with a peak time between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m."
(the numbers)
ONLY 5 MINUTES TO
GET TO THE LAB!!!
The professor's lecture runs a little long...
You have to cross...
Hey guys... why don't we build a bridge?
Bridges cost money
Precedent has been set on numerous occasions for publicly funded or subsidized public use structures.
One public funding idea would be to use a brick facade and/or pathway. This would enable the sale of personalized bricks to offset costs.
any other objections to a bridge?
Any pedestrian overpass and its access ramps must be ADA compliant. How do you expect to accomplish that with the limited space that we have?
Olympic College, Kitsap County, and the City of Bremerton, all have a vested interest in the safe movement of vehicles and pedestrians in that area, and as such, several options are available for funding, both public and private.
Can you attach a dollar sign to public health and safety?

Can you attach a dollar sign to public health and safety?

Can you attach a dollar sign to public health and safety?

So...
What exactly does the ADA require?
ADA Requirements:
1:12 slope ratio (1 foot of run for each inch of rise)
Maximum of 30 feet in a single run of ramp prior to a rest or turn platform
Minimum Platform size is 5’ x 5’
Minimum 36 inches of clear space across the ramp
How does that work with state and city regulations?
*Americans with Disabilities Act
Washington State Pedestrian Overpass Requirements:
*Per WSDOT Design Manual M22-01.09
July 2012
The minimum vertical clearance for a pedestrian bridge over a roadway is 17.5 feet.
The minimum width for a pedestrian bridge is 8 feet.
* That is almost 3 times the ADA required width, so no problem there.
Quick math:
18' of clearance to be safe
Hummm...
+ 2' of thickness for the bridge
= 20' x 12" = 240"
If you remember that the ADA requires a 1 foot run for every 1 inch of rise...
that means that your ramps will need to be 240 feet long...
but wait... there's more...
Quick math (cont.):
The ADA also requires a rest or turn platform with a minimum size of 5'x5' at minimum every 30 feet of ramp...
This means that every 30 feet you need to add at minimum another 5 feet of length with no rise.
240/30 = 8 8x5 = 40 240+40 = 280
The minimum length for your ramp is nearly the length of a football field...
What do we have to work with?
Scaled with grid using measured distance:
100'
60'
80'
50'
NHTSA Data:
Peak time for vehicle related pedestrian accidents are between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. and again from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Full transcript