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High Tech Reading in Literature Circle or in the Content Areas

Literacy for All Conference November 2012
by

Colette Bennett

on 20 November 2012

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Transcript of High Tech Reading in Literature Circle or in the Content Areas

Common Core Standards Activity #1a
Pre and Post reading Polls for non-fiction texts Common Core Standards for Reading and Writing in History/Social Studies, Science, Math, and the Technical Areas


R. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. Activity #3
Using the Comment Common Core Standards for Reading and Writing in History/Social Studies, Science, Math, and the Technical Areas


W. 2.Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
W. 4.Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
W. 6.Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. Activity # 4
Writing a RFI CAPT response on a wiki (shared platform) Activity #5
GoAnimate
Create a conversation that summarizes text The Common Core State Standards advise the inclusion of informational texts (the genre formally known as non-fiction) at all grade levels. The ratio by grade 12 should be 30% fiction and 70% informational texts. Activity #1b
Post-reading Poll

Exit Slips

Directions:
Retake poll. You may have more than one answer

Click here:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0An4lnfP3LpZAdDJ1SXAyQktTM1hLOEs1b0xhbFlKYWc#gid=0

Closing Activity:
What do you think accounts for the difference in the polls? Pre-Reading Poll for Informational Texts

Directions:
Complete poll on link.
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDJ1SXAyQktTM1hLOEs1b0xhbFlKYWc6MA#gid=0
You may have more than one answer.

How do you feel about rats?

* They are disgusting revolting creatures
* They do not disturb me
* They are clever
* They have redeeming qualities
* They have no redeeming qualities
* They are stupid beasts
* They should be admired

Directions:

1. Take pre-reading poll. Students may have more than one answer.
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dDJ1SXAyQktTM1hLOEs1b0xhbFlKYWc6MA#gid=0 Calling someone a "rat" is no compliment, but a new study shows that rats actually are empathetic and will altruistically lend a helping paw to a cage mate who is stuck in a trap.

Not only will rats frantically work to free their trapped cage mate; they will do so even when there's a tempting little pile of chocolate chips nearby, the study reveals. Instead of leaving their pal in the trap and selfishly gobbling the candy all by themselves, rats will free their cage mate and share the chocolate.

"To me that's absolutely stunning," says neurobiologist Peggy Mason of the University of Chicago. "The fact that the rat does that is really amazing."

Mason and her colleagues designed a series of experiments, described in the journal Science, to explore the evolutionary roots of empathy.

They wanted to look at rats because they already knew, from previous work, that rodents can be emotionally affected by the emotions of their cage mates. For example, during lab procedures, mice seem to experience more pain when they see another mouse in pain.

This is called "emotional contagion," and humans have it too just think of how one crying baby can make other babies cry. "But in the end, emotional contagion doesn't take you very far," says Mason. "It's an internal experience. It doesn't actually do anything for another individual."

So Mason and her colleagues devised a test to see if rats would take the next step and actually try to help out a fellow rat in distress. They took two cage mates, who knew each other, and trapped one of them in a narrow Plexiglas tube. That's a mild stressor and one the trapped rat doesn't like it would sometimes make an alarm call.

Over the course of several trials, a rat learns to open a container holding another rat.
The free rat outside of this tube seemed to immediately "get" the problem and would work to liberate its pal, says Mason.

The free rat would focus its activity on this plastic tube, crawling all over it and biting it, and interact with the trapped rat through little holes in the tube. "And if the trapped rat has a tail poking out, the free rat will actually grab that tail and kind of pull on it," says Mason.

Eventually, all this activity would lead to the free rat accidentally triggering a door that opened, releasing the trapped animal. The rats quickly learned to purposefully open the door, and during repeated experiments they would do so faster and faster but only for a trapped rat. They didn't act this way when the plastic trap was empty or contained a toy rat.

Rats would free their pals even if the experiment was set up so that the other rat was released into a different cage, so that the two rats did not get to interact after the door was opened. This suggests that the door-opener was really trying to aid its fellow rat, and not just working to get a playmate.


The researchers had a question for the rats: What is it worth to you, to free your fellow rat? "Obviously we can't ask that question verbally, so we wanted to ask it in terms that a rat can communicate to us," says Mason.

So the scientists used chocolate. They put rats into a cage that held two different clear plastic traps. One contained chocolate chips. The other contained the trapped cage mate.

Behaviors have to come from somewhere. And so it would be almost absurd to expect not to see some sort of simpler form of human sociabilities in other animals.

What they found is that the free rats quickly opened both cages, in no particular order. And they did not eat all the chocolate instead, they shared it with their fellow rat.

While the rats clearly engage in pro-social helping behavior, Mason says it's impossible to know the rats' internal experience of all this. "I think it's extremely unlikely that the rat has the same conscious experience that we do," says Mason.

Still, this study shows that the roots of empathy extend all the way back to rodents and aren't something that's unique to primates, she says.

A minority of rats never opened the trap's door, says Mason. They tended to freeze, suggesting that they felt their partner's distress but could not shake it off and calm down enough to take action.

Jeffrey Mogil of McGill University in Montreal, who has studied empathetic behavior in mice, says this is a surprising study.

"You know, it's one thing to free the trapped rat that might be making alarm calls. It's quite another thing to share the chocolate chips," Mogil says.

Previous work in Mogil's lab has shown that when mice are given a temporary stomach pain, their female cage mates will go spend more time near them. And the more time their cage mates spend with them, the less pain behavior the mice will show suggesting that the extra companionship is in response to the pain and that it actually helps in alleviating it.

Mogil says the new experiment on cage-opening rats is "a lot more robust, a lot less subtle" than that earlier mouse study.

"What's impressive about the current study is that it's an active response," says Mogil. "We can argue about why they're doing it, but there's absolutely no doubt in my mind that they're doing something that can really only be called pro-social behavior."

What's more, he says, the experimental setup in this study is so simple that he expects lots of labs, including his own, to repeat the rat study and start expanding on it.

He says it could be used to explore the neurobiology of helping behavior and allow scientists to find genes that are involved in empathy. He also wonders if rats would be as quick to help strange rats that weren't known to them, as opposed to their familiar cage mates.

Even though, in the past, many scientists have assumed that altruistic behavior is something uniquely human, Mogil says we really should not be so surprised to see it in the lowly rat.

"Behaviors have to come from somewhere," he notes. "And so it would be almost absurd to expect not to see some sort of simpler form of human sociabilities in other animals." Crappy Graphs
http://crappygraphs.com/user_graphs/makecrap.php http://www.quia.com/quiz/3755065.html https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Tqt8y1ciNJ_WewlMyP79SzcP9-aAD74bfYhblL7B6Ek/edit https://docs.google.com/document/d/14QIIvjXBM5mWOrY8rksfmKmaV-xcm_XSkXruCU42mMY/edit TEAM #1 http://goanimate.com/videos/0GL0nEy-9kZQ?utm_source=linkshare The Rat Story Class Tools
http://www.classtools.net/education-games-php/venn_intro

Example Graph:
http://classtools.net/widgets/venn_2circle_4/CiObw.htm Common Core Standards for Reading and Writing in History/Social Studies, Science, Math, and the Technical Areas
RW6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

RW. 7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/56184443/Rat%20Story%20for%20Literacy Good Luck!
from
Colette and Stephanie

The standards establish a “staircase” of increasing complexity in what students must be able to read so that all students are ready for the demands of college- and career-level reading no later than the end of high school. The standards also require the progressive development of reading comprehension so that students advancing through the grades are able to gain more from whatever they read. Key Points In English Language Arts Reading The standards appropriately defer the many remaining decisions about what and how to teach to states, districts, and schools. R.L.6 Analyze how differences in the points of view of the characters and the audience or reader (e.g., created through the use of dramatic irony) create such effects as suspense or humor.
In the ancient Ethiopia there lived a lad by name of Phaeton. His mother was an Ethiopian princess but Phaeton's father was the sun-god himself. One day Phaeton was playing with a friend he boasted that his father was Apollo, the sun-god. Phaeton's friend teased him by saying "Your father really isn't the Sun. Your mother just mad that up and you are foolish to believe such a story."
Phaeton went home confused and ashamed. He told his mother of the taunt and begged her to give him some proof that he really was the child of the Sun. His mother spoke softly but proudly, " My son, your father truly is the radiant Sun. but if you have doubts, then why not go to his palace and speak to him yourself? Go to the land of the far East and there in the high mountains you will find the glittering palace of your father , the Sun."
Phaeton was overjoyed at his mother's answer and mad himself ready for the long journey, He traveled in the lad of Persia and crossed the strange land of India. finally he came to the gigantic mountains at the eastern end of the world. The boy climbed into the mountains and found a palace that he immediately knew must belong to Apollo. Although it was early in the morning and still dark, this tall palace of gold and bronze glowed like fiery coals. The entrance of the palace was through two huge gleaning silver doors. On these doors were carved intricate details of the gods and creatures of the world.
The boy walked through the doorway and came upon a dazzling sight. There stood a golden-haired young woman dressed in a bright green robe. She was covered with flowers that had been braided into her long yellow hair. Nearby was a dark haired woman dressed in emerald green, holding an armful of golden grain. Beside her was a man with auburn hair and dressed in a robe of orange, yellow, and red leaves. His hands were stained purple and he held a cluster of freshly harvested grapes. Last of all was an old man whose bluish white hair and beard looked like icicles. These were the four seasons and they stood in a half circle around the brilliant throne. It hurt Phaeton's eyes to gaze at this throne, for it was made of shimmering jewels and upon his throne, sat Apollo. The god's eyes blazed like fire and the crown on his head seemed to be made of pure radiant light.
Apollo Spoke, " Why have you come here to the far ends of the earth, Phaeton?"
The boy replied, "Sir, I have come to find proof that you, great Apollo, are truly my father."
The Sun-god smiled and answered, " Your mother has spoken the truth. I am your father. As proof of this I will grant your one wish of your heart's desire."
No sooner had Apollo spoken when Phaeton blurted out, "I wish to drive your chariot, father."
The god of light quickly regretted giving his child a wish and pleaded, No, my child, choose something else. You ask for too dangerous of a gift. Even Zeus, the mighty god of thunder, will not drive the chariot of the Sun. The horses breathe out flames and the chariot itself is fiery hot. So powerful are the steeds that I, a full-grown god, can barely restrain them. What chance would a mortal boy have? The journey is steep and at times I have grown dizzy looking down from the great heights at the Earth below. The path through the stars leads near great, dangerous creatures. You would have top pass Taurus, the giant bull and by the fierce lion. If you succeed in getting past them you would face the Scorpion with its huge deadly stinger and the pinching claws of the great Crab. I beg you to pick some other gift. Think of all the riches in the world or pearls from the boundless sea. Ask for any of these and I shall gladly give it to you.
But Phaeton refused to change his mind and insisted on driving the chariot of the Sun. Apollo sighed and led the boy to the magnificent chariot. It was made of blazing gold , with golden wheels that had spokes of silver. The chariot was embedded with rubies and other precious gems. But unlike Earthly jewels, these gave off a dazzling glow. The horses were called and then brought forth by the Hours, goddesses who waited upon the sun.
At the time Aurora, goddess of the Dawn, opened the curtains of her splendid palace and the skies were filled with a rosy glow.
The sun-god spoke, "It is almost time for the chariot to begin its daily course. But there is still time for me to take your place. Heed my plea and let me go forth, my son."
But the lad still wanted to have his heart's desire. So his father anointed Phaeton's head with a magic oil and then placed the crown of light on the boy's head. Then he gave instruction, " Do not use the whip on the horses, my child, for the stallions have enough energy to speed forward on their own, Use the reins to restrain them since your must take the middle path through the heavens, That will be the safest for you and give the Earth the proper light and heat.
The glow from Aurora's palace had now turned golden and the morning star had set. Thus the day beckoned the horses of the Sun who were pawing the ground and letting out blasts of the fiery flames with each snort. wit a bolt, they charged forth. But their load was much lighter than what they were used to, so these steeds ran faster and wilder than usual.
poor Phaeton was terror-stricken and could barely hold the reins much less restrain the powerful horses. Higher and higher the stallions went and thus the rays of the Sun chariot grew distant from the Earth. The sky turned black as night, with the Sun only as a speck of light far above. The horses of the sun ran towards the pole star and in doing so came near the giant serpent. This serpent for ages had been sluggish and harmless since it was in the icy-cold regions of the pole star. But now the great heat from the sun chariot awoke the horrible snake and it hissed, exhaling poisonous breath.
As Pheaton looked down from this great height, his head grew dizzy and he felt sick in his stomach. With the furious horses of fire running madly before him, Phaeton wished he had never set foot in his father's chariot. Now the chariot was speeding head-long toward the gigantic Scorpion. The huge monster raised its tail in an attempt to slash out with is stinger. Then the fear-struck boy completely dropped the reins and the unchecked horses galloped downwards.
Closer and closer the fiery chariot came to the Earth. Rivers began to dry up, cities and forest caught fire because of the great heat. Neptune raised his head from the sea and shook his trident angrily at the chariot of the sun. But the air was so hot that Neptune soon dove back into the seep blue sea. As the chariot crossed the continent of Africa it was so close that it set on fire the great Sahara forest. That wooded region of northern Africa was reduced to ashes and burning sands.
All creatures began to cry to Zeus for help because of the unbearable heat. The gods. the humans, the animals, and the Earth herself were afraid that everything would soon be burned up. Zeus listened to their plea and then he climbed on high. He was armed with a thunderbolt and he threw the deadly shaft at the chariot of the sun. The magic oil Apollo had put on Phaeton protected the boy from the heat and the flames of the chariot, but it could not save him from a thunderbolt of Zeus. There was a deafening crash as the lightening shattered the chariot and Phaeton fell wrapped in sizzling flames. The horses ran home while pieces of the wrecked chariot fell hissing into the sea.
Quickly the master craftsman of the gods, Vulcan, made a new golden chariot for the sun. But Apollo was so sad over his son's death that he refused to drive it. So the next day passed without sunlight.Zeus and the other gods then came and pleaded with Apollo, begging him not to leave the world in darkness. the sun god spoke bitterly of his son's death at the hand of Zeus.
But the chief of gods replied, "You have lost a son, true. But how many men on Earth were burned up? I had no choice but to blast the fiery chariot, otherwise every creature on Earth would have been destroyed."
With these words and those of the other gods, Apollo was finally persuaded to return to his rightful duty. He bridled his fiery horses to the Sun chariot the next day and the Sun once again traveled its correct course. It still gives proper light and heat to this very day. Phaeton and the Chariot of the Sun Pre-Reading Poll for Greek Myth
Directions:
Complete poll on link
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dGQwMERKaUEzNzdNMUFFd1V2VU5MM2c6MQ

You may have more than one answer.

What is the purpose of a myth?
*To explain something that cannot be explained by science
*To tell a story that entertains
*To caution people how to behave
*To give a message ("the moral of the story is...")
*To frighten people into action
*To teach a lesson
*To connect to other cultures with the same stories
*To create a truth
*To expose a truth English Language Arts Common Core Standards


R. 2. Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0An4lnfP3LpZAdGF4TXV1ZXpQZ1lHb3NhaXpkeUVPaUE https://docs.google.com/a/rsd6.org/document/d/1wH6L5fY3RcBrYt_OYUPjZ0V7BgCplwWQVlGhykLNTKg/edit R. 2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text,including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text


R. 4 . Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts. Activity #3
Comments using Google Docs Create Subheadings https://docs.google.com/document/d/14QIIvjXBM5mWOrY8rksfmKmaV-xcm_XSkXruCU42mMY/edit Common Core Standards for Reading and Writing in History/Social Studies, Science, Math, and the Technical Areas

R.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. English Language Arts Common Core

R. 2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text,including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text


R.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. Character Comments on Another Character
R. 4.Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Common Core Standards for Reading and Writing in History/Social Studies, Science, Math, and the Technical Areas Activity #2 Multiple Choice Questions

W. 3.Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.
W.4.Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
W. 6.Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. Through reading a diverse array of classic and contemporary literature as well as challenging informational texts in a range of subjects, students are expected to build knowledge, gain insights, explore possibilities, and broaden their perspective. Because the standards are building blocks for successful classrooms, but recognize that teachers, school districts and states need to decide on appropriate curriculum, they intentionally do not offer a reading list. Instead, they offer numerous sample texts to help teachers prepare for the school year and allow parents and students to know what to expect at the beginning of the year.The standards mandate certain critical types of content for all students, including classic myths and stories from around the world, foundational U.S. documents, seminal works of American literature, and the writings of Shakespeare. Activity #1
Pre and Post Reading Polls Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects Students must be able to read complex informational texts in these fields with independence and confidence because the vast majority of reading in college and workforce training programs will be sophisticated nonfiction. Reading is critical to building knowledge in history/social studies as well as in science and technical subjects. College and career ready reading in these fields requires an appreciation of the norms and conventions of each discipline, such as the kinds of evidence used in history and science; an understanding of domain-specific words and phrases; an attention to precise details; and the capacity to evaluate intricate arguments, synthesize complex information, and follow detailed descriptions of events and concepts. In history/social studies, for example,students need to be able to analyze, evaluate, and differentiate primary and secondary sources. When reading scientific and technical texts, students need to be able to gain knowledge from challenging texts that often make extensive use of elaborate diagrams and data to convey information and illustrate concepts. Common Core Standards
for English Language Arts CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. Create a photoessay using photopeach.  Write an explanation for each image. see example:
http://photopeach.com/album/nkumki Tech Guru
30 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading

Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Create a Powerpoint (or Sliderocket or Google presentation) of 10 vocabulary words. The slide should contain the definition; the word used in a sentence, synonyms/antonyms, and an illustration. You may add additional elements (sound/video) Word Master
60-80 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading

Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Select characters from the novel and explore the meanings of their names: EX: The name Luke is a Latin baby name. In Latin the meaning of the name Luke is: Light giving. From Lucania (Lucania was a district of ancient Italy). Luke was the author of the Acts of the Apostles and of the third Gospel in the New Testament, the patron saint of doctors and artists, and was known as 'the beloved physician'. Word Master
30 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading

Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Record an answering machine message using as many vocabulary words as possible. Use Voice Thread or Voice Thread for iPhone or iPad. Word Master
5 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading

Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.


Create an “illuminated passage”on a Google Doc

The Road Illuminated Passage
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1HlGlgcuRHmO3-Ej6vONCTovHN5uF-vVRSQlw2E6rwcc/edit Passage Master
60-80 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading

Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
Use dialogue in the passage to create a "fakebook” conversation.
http://www.classtools.net/fb/home/page
Incorporate exact language from the text. Passage Master
30 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading

Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Passage Master
5 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
R.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 
R.9 Show two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Recreate the Hero's Journey or the Hero's Inner Journey using one of the characters in your book.
video:
  Connector (continued)
60-80 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
R.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 
R.9 Show two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.

Log into New York Times Replica Edition and find an article that you can connect to the book you are reading.  Write the headline of the article on a separate sheet of paper, summarize the article and explain the connection to your text. Connector
30 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading


Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*

If the setting of your book is in the United States, compare the setting to another country using If It Were My Home website: http://www.ifitweremyhome.com/  Prepare a report for the class. Connector
5 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
R.3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*

Write a script for a radio- talk show using text from the book; Cast the script with members from your group and record the show on audacity (www.audacity.com) Voicethread or other voice recording software software. Discussion Director
60-80 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
R.3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text Write a business letter to the author using the interactive letter writing * (will need printer) website. If the author is alive, send the letter. Discussion Director
30 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Create a Google poll with three predictions; have other students take your poll. Discussion Director -5 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Select lines, words or phrases from the text and rearrange them to create a "found" poem OR decorate a page of text to reveal words that stand out to create a poem (video).  Copy your passage on a Google document
Watch this video to understand how to create a "blackout" poem where you eliminate all but the words you want to create a poem from a text. Creative Chair (continued)
30 minute CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Record an answering machine message for a character in the novel on Voice Thread, Audacity or Vocaroo http://vocaroo.com/ Creative Chair
5 minutes The Six Chairs:
Roles and Activities CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
R.3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. Interview one or several characters from the book using Xtranormal. Write a script and then feed it into Xtranormal to produce films with characters enacting it. The free version of Xtranormal allows for a maximum of two characters. http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/13870737/robotz-movie Tech Guru
60-80 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading

Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Craft and Structure 
R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Tweet a message: 
http://faketweetbuilder.com/ Tech Guru
5 Minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.
R.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 
R.9 Show two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Connector
60-80 minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
R.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.*
Create a scrapbook for your character. What mementos would be in the book? photos? letters? ticket stubs? Use Glogster to create this scrapbook page. Creative Chair
60-80 Minutes CCSS Standards-ELA Reading
Key Ideas and Details 
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Create a paper fortune teller that does one of the following:
provides character descriptions
reviews highlights/key points of the book
matches the quote to the speaker.
Watch tutorial for making paper fortune tellers: Creative Chair
30 minutes  Create a music playlist for this chapter-(5) five songs with explanations. (i-Pod) or place links to these songs on a Google Doc to share Create full page advertisement of something a character desires, a location in the text, or an object of significance. Be sure to include information about the qualities of the item being advertised, the economic value, and the availability of the item in bulk/size/duration.  Embed Questions in a Google Doc Embed Questions in Quia Software (correcting) Embed questions in a Google Doc Record an answering machine message using Voice Thread for iPhone or iPad.https://voicethread.com/share/3634322/  Locate a photo that would be found in a character's photo files. Upload the photo to Google Docs. Explain why this photo was chosen.
https://docs.google.com/drawings/d/1GI7UPJMuoX6FfhGLHIj2wqDwOiy6K2RrSrKfSOVL5lM/edit http://www.glogster.com/iheartwaffle/the-giver/g-6liqbajkl26ttu007q4rca0 Create a board game (using a template) that matches the "journey" taken by a character from your book. You have been selected to curate a museum exhibition that combines text from the book and famous works of art. Pair up at least 5 passages with famous paintings found in museums. Give explanations for your choices. Use a Google presentation as the format for this assignment. TONE = Desolate
“Be with me always, take any form, drive me mad, only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! I cannot live without my life. I cannot live without my soul.” The Sea of Ice By Micki Gregoire Wuthering Heights in Art TONE = Sternness
“Who the devil gave you leave to touch a stick about the place?” (305) Tiger http://people.uncw.edu/ertzbergerj/word_games.html https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dENaUkhIN3p6dXhYcVNPXzhBcGJBNkE6MQ Choose a passage or image and using ipad software-Educreation App (free) record a group conversation and notes around a picture or image
http://www.educreations.com/ http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/letter_generator/ Type into your Internet browser:
eedition.nytimes.com
(http://eedition.nytimes.com)

At the log in screen, type in:

Username: 200350791
Password: 200350791 Create a mash-up of your book and another medium (music video, movie clip) or other technology.
There are great websites with k-12 videos:
http://www.kideos.com/
http://childrensyoutube.blogspot.com/

YouTube splicing software:
http://www.tubechop.com/

Videostar app (fee-iPad and iPhone)
http://videostarapp.com/ Scholastic also has character scrapbook software: http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/scrapbook/ Timeline to Timeline.  Recreate the timeline of your book.  Match a moment in your text to a real life historical event, or follow the life of a writer, or the events in a book..
www.timetoast.com http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/133976 Interactive video: http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/student-interactives/hero-journey-30069.html Choose an inspiring passage from your novel and create a motivational poster using Big Huge Labs software Use the Arcade Game Generator to create a quiz for members of your group-need 10 questions
http://www.classtools.net/_mobileQuiz/index.php Create a "twister" profile for a character in the book
http://www.classtools.net/twister/ Create a trading card for one character using the interactive trading card creator http://www.classtools.net/education-games-php/burger Planning an essay: Building a Thesis:
http://www.tommarch.com/electraguide/thesis.php Plagiarism Checker http://www.dustball.com/cs/plagiarism.checker/ Easy Bibliography creator
http://www.easybib.com/ Purdue Owl
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/ Activity #6 Lessonwriter Despite what you may have heard, our students are not digital natives. They are digital tourists.
In the foreign soils of the Internet, they will gravitate to the most familiar sites, the same way that tourists will gravitate to a McDonald’s in Paris or Rome.
They are uncomfortable with the unfamiliar. Our Digital Tourists Differentiated Platforms for modality
Audio and video
Differentiated Platforms for ability
low performer –high performer
Differentiated Platforms for skills
strands
Digital Portfolios Why High Tech? Mini lessons
Grammar
Techniques
Assigned writing (by genre)
Free writing
Student choice
Peer review Wamogo uses Literature Circles in Grades 7-11 Twitter
Prezi
Word-sift
Wordle
Linot
Animoto
Quia Voice Thread
Glogster
GoAnimate
Yudu
Collaborize Classroom
Fakebook Other FREE High Tech Tools
(That we use) Information, Media and Technology Skills

Today, we live in a technology and media-driven environment, marked by access to an abundance of information, rapid changes in technology tools and the ability to collaborate and make individual contributions on an unprecedented scale. Effective citizens and workers must be able to exhibit a range of functional and critical thinking skills, such as:
• Information Literacy
• Media Literacy
• ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) Literacy 21st Century Skills Presented By
Colette Bennett
and Stephanie Pixley
Region #6 -Litchfield, CT Reader's Workshop Graduates to High Tech Literature Circles Quizlet
PB Works Google Docs
Edmodo
Livebinders Favorite FREE High Tech Tools
(We could not teach without) http://bighugelabs.com/motivator.php http://bighugelabs.com/deck.php Write a Story using 10 vocabulary words using Storyjumper or Storybird (needs flash) StoryJumper is a place to create and discover stories for kids. Storybird uses art as the inspiration for the story. http://storybird.com/

Student Samples:

https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/60633291/Storybirds http://www.storyjumper.com/ http://www.behindthename.com/ Take a chapter and create a Reader's Theatre script that can be performed by the members of your group. Highlight the sections of the script you want them to read (dialogue is best for this) on a Google Doc that can be shared.
(Resources for scripts: http://www.ala.org/alsc/issuesadv/kidscampaign/libraryactivities

http://www.storycart.com/prometheus.pdf Create a 10 line conversation/dialogue using vocabulary words: www.goanimate.com Create a set (4 or 5) of trading cards for characters from the book using the trading card creator. http://www.readwritethink.org/parent-afterschool-resources/games-tools/trading-card-creator-a-30181.html Use Piclit to create a visual that matches theme to text
http://www.piclits.com/compose_dragdrop.aspx Use Quizlet (www.quizlet.com) to create a vocabulary word list; play one of the “games. Create a photo collage http://www.kizoa.com/ Plot the journey out on a GoogleMap using the MyMaps app or Google Maps. This app makes using Google Maps editing tools easier to use on the iPad than using the Internet version. The tracer can add pictures and text to the map explaining the journey taken during the story. Here is a video tutorial on how to create a Google map. Create a wordle with a selected passage; determine why certain words are emphasized:
http://www.wordle.net/ High Tech Literature Circles 2. Create a Venn Diagram using software that shows opinions before reading article, after reading article, and what opinions did not change.
3. Share Venn Diagram Create a wordle or priority words list http://www.wordle.com or
http://www.wordsift.com
using a passage from the novel. Explain the significance of the words that stand out in the text.Create a wordle or priority words list using a passage from the novel. Explain the significance of the words that stand out in the text. Activity #4 Use a Wiki Platform https://wamogodemo.pbworks.com/w/page/56184443/Rat%20Story%20for%20Literacy CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.3 Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).
Craft and Structure
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. Common Core Standards Informational Texts Activity #5
Use Animation for Narration GoAnimate for Narratives Common Core Standards for Reading and Writing in History/Social Studies, Science, Math, and the Technical Areas Use google forms to design pre and post reading polls. http://goanimate.com/videos/0GL0nEy-9kZQ?utm_source=linkshare LessonWriter Software CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.9 Analyze how a modern work of fiction draws on themes, patterns of events, or character types from myths, traditional stories, or religious works such as the Bible, including describing how the material is rendered new. Technology Tools We Use for Writing Student Sample:

http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?vps=2&hl=en&ie=UTF8&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=217983435127567073442.0004bcbb587a5e53659b9 Using Make Beliefs Comics comic strip generator, create a 3 box comic strip using one or two of this week's vocabulary words.
http://www.makebeliefscomix.com/Comix/

Check out this sample comic:
https://wamogojuniors11.pbworks.com/w/page/60564197/Comic%20Strip%20Samples http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=578161&backurl=/shelf/my Other:
http://www.animoto.com

Sample Animoto
http://animoto.com/play/wyyzqgbMes6gA6toavzHbg http://www.classtools.net/twister/output.php?username=regencychick&realname=Jane+Austen&tweet=Just+had+a+genius+idea+for+a+novel%2521+Woman+meets+dude+who+seems+horrible+-+but+then+he+turns+out+to+be+nice+really+so+they+get+together%2521%2521%2521&date=1812&button=Submit CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two).
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