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Commas

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by

Julia Schott

on 22 September 2012

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Transcript of Commas

THE COMMA Did you know that using incorrect punctuation could be deadly? For example:

Let's eat Grandpa. What's wrong with this? You might want to eat a huge hot dog, but a huge, hot dog would run away pretty quickly if you tried to take a bite out of him. Rule #1 For class tomorrow I need my Writer's Choice book, planner, and language arts binder. Use commas to separate three or more items in a series. Notice the comma placement Rule #2 Yes, we do have homework in class today.

Hannah, can you pass me the salt?

First, we went to the zoo. Use a comma to show a pause
after an introductory word. Rule #3 For a number of years, I went to Hilton Head Island for my family's vacation. Use a comma after two or more prepositional phrases at the beginning of a sentence. What is a preposition? A preposition is a word that relates a noun or a pronoun to some other word in a sentence.
about
after
along
despite
near
opposite
through
without Prepositions can also be more than one word:
according to
because of
instead of
on top of Rule #4 The teacher, of course, assigned homework for the weekend.

Kelsey, as you can imagine, arrived late to the birthday party.
Use commas to set off words that interrupt the flow of thought in a sentence. Rule #5 Jill, clean your room after dinner.

Miss Schott, do you have an extra pencil? Use commas to set off names used in direct address. Rule #6 She was going to the football game, but it was canceled due to rain.

I went to the store, and I picked up my dry-cleaning.
Use a comma before and, or, or, but when it joins simple sentences into a compound sentence. Rule #7 Use a comma after the salutation of a friendly letter and after the closing of both a friendly letter and a business letter. Let's eat Grandpa.
Let's eat, Grandpa.

Instead of one, two friends are visiting Ian. Use a comma to prevent misreading.
Rule #8
Full transcript