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the mending wall

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Courtney Lee

on 27 March 2013

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Transcript of the mending wall

The Mending Wall By: Robert Frost Prezi By: Dakota, Alejandro, Grant, and Courtney Work Cited
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cumbrian_stone_wall.JPG

"Mending Wall" by Robert Frost


http://www.shmoop.com/mending-wall/

Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder
If I could put a notion in his head:
'Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it
Where there are cows?
But here there are no cows.
Before I built a wall I'd ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offense.
Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That wants it down.' I could say 'Elves' to him, Something there is that doesn't love a wall,
That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,
And spills the upper boulders in the sun,
And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.
The work of hunters is another thing:
I have come after them and made repair
Where they have left not one stone on a stone,
But they would have the rabbit out of hiding,
To please the yelping dogs. The gaps I mean,
No one has seen them made or heard them made,
But at spring mending-time we find them there.
I let my neighbor know beyond the hill;
And on a day we meet to walk the line
And set the wall between us once again.
We keep the wall between us as we go. To each the boulders that have fallen to each.
And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
'Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'
We wear our fingers rough with handling them.
Oh, just another kind of out-door game,
One on a side. It comes to little more:
There where it is we do not need the wall:
He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees will never get across
And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him.
He only says, 'Good fences make good neighbors'. "He is all pine and I am apple orchard.
My apple trees never get across and eat the cones under his pines," Metaphors Compares the narrator to an apple orchard and his neighbor to pine trees. What is the Poem About? What Is The Mending Wall About? This poem is about two neighbors separated by a wall. Each winter, the wall falls apart and each spring, the narrator and his neighbor come out and fix the wall. The narrator wonders about needing the wall but, the neighbor just says "good fences make good neighbors." The narrator tries to convince his neighbor to take the wall down but, the neighbor just repeats the phrase "good fences make good neighbors." The Mending Wall But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather
He said it for himself. I see him there
Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top
In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed.
He moves in darkness as it seems to me~
Not of woods only and the shade of trees.
He will not go behind his father's saying,
And he likes having thought of it so well
He says again, "Good fences make good neighbors." A metaphor compares the "stone blocks" to "loaves and balls". A metaphor-hyperbole compares the method of placing the rocks to a spell. And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
"Stay where you are until our backs are turned!" Alliteration In lines 32 and 33, Frost uses alliteration: Before I built a wall I'd ask to know / What I was walling in or walling out. Personification "And some are loaves and some so nearly balls
We have to use a spell to make them balance:
"Stay where you are until our backs are turned!"

This is personification because they treat the blocks as if they were people. Authors Background Robert Frost (1874-1963) was born in San Francisco, California, where he spent his childhood. In 1885, after his father died of tuberculosis, the Frosts moved to Massachusetts. There, Robert graduated from high school, sharing top honors with a student he would later marry, Elinor White. Frost attended Dartmouth and Harvard, married Miss White in 1895, worked farms, and taught school. In his spare time, he wrote poetry. Style Frost wrote poetry in the simple language of everyday conversation and leaves the reader with unanswered questions. Thus, Frost is simple and complex, obvious and obscure. Historical Context The year that Frost wrote the poem, 1914, is significant, for it was in August of that year that World War 1 began. Verse Robert Frost wrote "Mending Wall" in blank verse, "a form of poetry with unrhymed lines in iambic pentameter, a metric scheme with five pairs of syllables per line, each pair containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable." The first four lines of the poem demonstrate the pattern. Simile The line "like an old-stone savage armed..." is an example of a simile. Theme It shows both the need for separation from our neighbors, but also a need for us to work together as we all live in this world together. It also shows how we build barriers to keep other people out, but also other people do the very same thing.
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