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Alas, so all things now do hold their peace

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by

rae cheema

on 12 March 2014

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Transcript of Alas, so all things now do hold their peace

Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey (1516/17 - 1547)
• he was one of the founders of English Renaissance poetry
• he was a first cousin of Catherine Howard, who was the fifth wife of King Henry VIII and his first cousin was Anne Boleyn
• he and Thomas Wyatt were the first English poets to write in the sonnet form that Shakespeare later used
• he and Wyatt are known as "Fathers of the English Sonnet"
• he was the one of the first English poets to publish blank verse
• he gave sonnets the rhyming meter and the division into quatrains that now characterizes English, Elizabethan, or Shakespearean sonnets
• he was beheaded after he was found guilty of treason towards King Henry VIII

Alas, so all things now do hold their peace!
Heaven and earth disturbèd in no thing;
The beasts, the air, the birds their song do cease,
The nightès car the stars about doth bring;
Calm is the sea; the waves work less and less:
So am not I, whom love, alas! doth wring,
Bringing before my face the great increase
Of my desires, whereat I weep and sing,
In joy and woe, as in a doubtful case.
For my sweet thoughts sometime do pleasure bring:
But by and by, the cause of my disease
Gives me a pang that inwardly doth sting,
When that I think what grief it is again
To live and lack the thing should rid my pain.

Alas, So All Things Now Do Hold Their Peace
Analysis
Alas, so all things now do hold their peace!
Heaven and earth disturbèd in no thing;
The beasts, the air, the birds their song do cease,
The nightès car the stars about doth bring;
Calm is the sea; the waves work less and less:
So am not I, whom love, alas! doth wring,
Bringing before my face the great increase
Of my desires, whereat I weep and sing,
In joy and woe, as in a doubtful case.
For my sweet thoughts sometime do pleasure bring:
But by and by, the cause of my disease
Gives me a pang that inwardly doth sting,
When that I think what grief it is again
To live and lack the thing should rid my pain.
Why Is this Poem Worthy
Biographical & Historical Information
By, Raman Cheema
Rose Zhao
Alas, so all things now do hold their peace
Written by Henry Howard Earl of Surrey
Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
• This is not the only poem Surrey wrote about unrequited love. Other poems include "Description of Spring," "Love That Doth Reign Within My Thought," and more.
Other Information
Henry Howard is an
important figure in English Literature. He was one of the founders of English Renaissance poetry and is known as one of the Fathers of the English Sonnet. Surrey's sonnets should be taught in classes because they are by such an important poet.
He wrote in the sonnet form that was used later by Shakespeare, meaning that he wrote in the form before Shakespeare did. This sonnet in particular is worth discussing in class because it is different and interesting. Instead of a love that is powerful and everlasting, this poem talks about one-sided love. It gives a view point on how love can bring both happiness and misery. Surrey's life is very interesting because of his relations and connections with King Henry VIII and other important figures such as Anne Boleyn.
Why Is this Poem Worthy - Continued
Everything surrounding poet is at peace
The speaker is not at peace, unlike his surroundings
Tortured by love
False love, it is selfish
Causes conflicting emotions
Pun: dis-ease, lack of ease
Satire: a foolish male is out of synch with the rest of god's creations
Sexual overtones
Full transcript