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Romeo and Juliet - Intertextuality

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by

Emma Walsh

on 10 September 2013

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Transcript of Romeo and Juliet - Intertextuality

Romeo and Juliet - Intertextuality

design by Dóri Sirály for Prezi
What is Intertextuality?
- No one has affected the English language more than William Shakespeare
- Endless seems, powerful themes
- We are constantly seeing new creations such as Baz Luhrmanns ‘Romeo + Juliet’ and posters that are relevant and accessible to contemporary audiences
- Connection that bonds two texts
- Intertextuality is ever so present in our modern society
- William Shakespeare's plays continue in our modern culture
- LOVE, TRAGEDY, LUST, DIFFERENCE, VIOLENCE and HATE
- Poster from our society
- Balcony scene
- Modern language
- Showing traits from borrowed texts
- Modern language used by teenagers and adolescents
- LOVE and DIFFERENCE
- Relevant and accessible to contemporary audiences
- Strongly connects with original script
- Sharing many of the same scenes
- Ends in absolute tragedy
- Different clothing and weapons
- LOVE, TRAGEDY, DIFFERENCE, VIOLENCE, HATE and LUST
- Biggest differences
- Beautiful and romantic church
- A place she would love to be as opposed to her family crypt
- Baz Luhrmann has drawn from Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet to craft his own film
Intertextuality
Relevant and accessible in our modern culture!
Full transcript