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Alliteration, Consonance, Assonance, and Onomatopoeia

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Katie Wampler

on 6 November 2014

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Transcript of Alliteration, Consonance, Assonance, and Onomatopoeia

Alliteration, Consonance, Assonance, & Onomatopoeia
Assonance
What:
the repetition of vowel sounds within words

Why:
provides a rhythmic quality to poetry or prose
makes poems easier to memorize
lends structure, flow, and beauty to any piece of writing
Alliteration
What:
The repetition of consonant sounds at the
beginning
of words or syllables
*Alliteration is a type of consonance*

Why:
provides a rhythmic quality to poetry or prose
makes poems easier to memorize
lends structure, flow, and beauty to any piece of writing
Consonance
What:
the close repetition of consonant sounds

Why:
provides a rhythmic quality to poetry or prose
makes poems easier to memorize
lends structure, flow, and beauty to any piece of writing

She sells seashells by the seashore.
Are the beginning sounds of these words exactly the same?
Which is an example of alliteration?
City, Search

City, Country
Examples
Bi
g
do
g

I had to
thi
nk
about the
bla
nk
on the form at the
ba
nk
.
Don't confuse consonance with rhyme!
Example
You're the l
i
ght of m
y
l
i
fe.

I feel d
e
pr
e
ssed and r
e
stl
e
ss.
Where is the alliteration? Where is the assonance?
Twinkling twilight meets twice at the edge of night.
What is the difference between assonance and rhyme?
What makes a word sound beautiful?
The most beautiful phrase in the English language:
Cellar door
On the sheet of paper from the beginning of class, make a list of at least 10 words you find beautiful because of the way they sound
Now write a poem using at least seven of your words
The poem does not need to make sense, but should instead play with sound
It should not rhyme, but should use some of the sound devices we learned today
My example
Luscious
Sunshine
Saskatchewan
Memory
Majestic
Shimmering
Glimmer
Fantasia
Dalmatian
Kaleidoscope
Bubbly
Ocean
Sailing
Imagination
I'm homesick
A fantasia of bubbly ocean sunshine
Engulfs me
But my sailing imagination
Leads me home
To a white Dalmatian
A blue tick hound
And you
Determine the sound being repeated in each phrase and whether it is an example of alliteration, consonance, or assonance
(some examples can be more than one!)
1. Will she read these cheap leaflets?
2. He keeps the kitchen clean.
3. You could paddle through the spittle in the bottle.
4. Hear the mellow wedding bells.
5. Surely she will show up.
We Real Cool
by Gwendolyn Brooks
The Pool Players.
Seven at the Golden Shovel.


We real cool. We
Left school. We

Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We
Thin gin. We

Jazz June. We
Die soon.
The Labyrinth
by Robert P. Baird
Torn turned and tattered
Bowed burned and battered
I took untensed time by the teeth
And bade it bear me banking
Out over the walled welter
cities and the sea
Through the lightsmocked birdpocked cloudcocked sky
To leave me light on a lilting planetesimal.

The stone walls wailed and whimpered
The bold stars paled and dimpled
Godgone time gathered to a grunt
And bore me bled and breaking
On past parted palisades
windrows and the trees
Over a windcloaked nightsoaked starpoked sea
To drop me where? Deep in a decadent’s dream.
Try to describe...
...the sound toast makes when it comes out of the toaster
...the sound an oven makes when the timer is up
...the sound of the bell when classes change
It's hard to describe a sound without using onomatopoeia!
Onomatopoeia
What:
The use of words that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to.

Why:
More vivid language
Appeals to the reader's senses
It's hard to describe sounds!
What are some examples of
onomatopoeia?
Power Up
What is your favorite word? Why? Is it your favorite word because of its definition or because of the way it sounds?

Write at least 5 sentences.
On a separate sheet of paper (not in your notes):
The Bells
By Edgar Allan Poe
First time through - read silently to yourself. Make notes on the poem if you need to. What do you notice? What stands out to you? After the first reading, what does the poem mean?
Let's discuss!
Second Reading
Pay attention to word choice. What is the connotation of the words?Circle any words you do not know.
Third Reading
I - female with a high-pitched voice
II - female with a lower-pitched voice
III - male with a higher-pitched voice
IV - male with a lower-pitched voice
What do you notice?
How does sound mirror theme?
Literary Analysis
-an essay that analyzes a piece of literature (poetry or prose)
-Usually at least 5 paragraphs, but we'll start with 4:
1. Introduction
2. Body 1
3. Body 2
4. Conclusion
How do the words change from the beginning of the poem to the end?
How does this affect the meaning of the poem?
Full transcript