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ATG May 2018: Kodomo No Hi- Japan

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on 3 May 2018

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Transcript of ATG May 2018: Kodomo No Hi- Japan

Kodomo No Hi
Art-To-Go May 2018
K-3
4-6
Let's Create a Kendama Game!
JH/HS
Art at the Museum
Let's Create Koinobori Flags!
Art at the Museum

Japan is more than 1/2 the size of Texas
Let's Create an Origami Kabuto!
Did you know that the country of Japan has a holiday that is just for kids?

In Japan, students look forward to KODOMO NO HI
("Ko-Doh-Mo No Hee") each Spring.

This is a painting of a KOINOBORI flag.

Do you remember the significance of the Koinobori (Carp fish) to the Kodomo No Hi celebration?
What are the Koinobori a SYMBOL for?

This flag has been placed into a flower arrangement, creating a STILL-LIFE for the artist to paint.

What is a STILL-LIFE? (How is it different from a PORTRAIT or a LANDSCAPE?)

The artist who painted this still-life was one of the founders of our museum (the Old Jail Art Center).
He and his cousin Reilly started the museum to display their family's art and artifacts for people in West Texas to come and see!

Bill and his parents loved to travel to Asia- especially to China and Japan.
Perhaps this Koinobori flag was a souvenir from one of his family's trips?
Each year on the 5th of May, the whole country of Japan celebrates children.
On this special holiday, adults celebrate the health, growth and happiness of children and students.
Since the holiday is a celebration just for them, the children of Japan look forward to this day where they get to relax and fun without most of the usual rules and routines. They know that their teachers, parents and grandparents will do special things to show them that they are loved.

Today, we will explore the history of this holiday and all the ways that Japanese families make May 5th special.
Kodomo No Hi Traditions
Still Life with Koi Kite, c. 1955
BILL BOMAR
Oil on canvas
1982.008
Still Life with Koi Kite, c. 1955
BILL BOMAR
Oil on canvas
1982.008
Art at the Museum
Still Life with Koi Kite, c. 1955
BILL BOMAR
Oil on canvas
1982.008
Kodomo No Hi Traditions
Symbols of Strength, Health
and Success
Kodomo No Hi
Holidays are celebrated in the same way in all cultures- people decorate, make special food, play games and spend time with loved ones!
During Kodomo No Hi, Japanese families celebrate with the following:

Decorations:
Outside their homes, families fly KOINOBORI flags- one for each parent and child that lives there.
Inside the home, parents often create a special display that includes SHOBU, KABUTO and other pieces of Samurai armor.

Food:
Kids enjoy special treats like MOCHI (sweet rice treats wrapped in oak leaves) and CHIMAKI (steamed sweet rice wrapped in bamboo leaves). The oak and bamboo leaves also represent strength and fortitude.

Games:
One popular game that Japanese children play on this holiday is called KENDAMA. It is a very old game that has been enjoyed for hundreds of years.
Look at the image on the right and guess the challenge of this game.
What Western toy/ game are you familiar with that this is similar to?
Hint: We studied another version of this type of game from a different world culture earlier this year.
Holidays are celebrated in the same way in all cultures- people decorate, make special food, play games and spend time with loved ones! During Kodomo No Hi, Japanese families celebrate with the following:
Decorations:
Families fly KOINOBORI flags outside their homes, one for each parent and child that lives there.
Inside the home, parents often create a special display that includes
SHOBU (purple iris flowers) which are believed to be a symbol for good luck and success!
KABUTO (Samurai warrior helmet) and armor- which represents their hope that their children will grow up to be brave and strong!

Food:
Children enjoy special treats like MOCHI (sweet rice treats) and CHIMAKI (steamed sweet rice wrapped in bamboo leaves)

Games:
One popular game that Japanese children play on this holiday is called KENDAMA.
It is a very old game that has been enjoyed for hundreds of years!
Look at the image on the right and guess what the challenge of this game might be!
The toy involves a TAMA (ball) attached to a KEN (handle).
What Western game are you familiar with that this is similar to?

Let's watch a video of a Japanese boy who is an expert at playing Kendama!


Today we will each create a Kendama game and decorate it with SYMBOLS from Kodomo No Hi!

First, we will write our names and
KODOMO NO HI 2018
on our tube, and then we will add SYMBOLS like SHOBU (Purple Irises), KABUTO (Samurai Helmets), and KOINOBORI flags! (look at the images below for reminders of these symbols)

We will then use crayon to color the background of our KEN (handles) in a traditional color from the holiday (Red, Yellow, Blue or Green).

When the desgins on our KEN are complete, we will tie our TAMA (ball) to the end of our string and make a knot.

At the end of class today, we will try our luck at the Japanese game of Kendama using our personalized toys!
Kodomo No Hi is a holiday that celebrates ALL the children in Japan. (But it didn't used to be that way!)
A long time ago, this holiday was only for boys, and girls were not given their own carp kite on the family flag pole.
Let's read an old story about a little girl named Kimiko who wanted a KOINOBORI of her own- just like the ones her brothers had.
Kimiko will learn about traditions, and how traditions can change!
[Read book]
...

Each year on the 5th of May, the whole country of Japan celebrates children.
On this special holiday, adults celebrate the health, growth and happiness of children and students.
Since the holiday is a celebration of being a kid, the children of Japan look forward to this day
when they get to relax and fun without most of the usual rules and routines.
They know that their teachers, parents and grandparents will do special things to show them that they are loved.
This is a painting of a KOINOBORI flag.

Do you remember why Koinobori (Carp fish) are an important part of the Kodomo No Hi celebration?
What are the Koinobori a SYMBOL for?

This flag has been placed into a flower arrangement, creating a STILL-LIFE for the artist to paint.

What is a STILL-LIFE?
(How is it different from a PORTRAIT or a LANDSCAPE?)

The artist who painted this still-life was one of the founders of our museum (the Old Jail Art Center).
He and his cousin Reilly started the museum to display their family's art and artifacts for people in West Texas to come and see!

Bill and his parents loved to travel to Asia- especially to China and Japan.
Perhaps this Koinobori flag was a souvenir from one of his family's trips?
Each year on the 5th of May, the whole country of Japan celebrates its youth.
On this special holiday, adults celebrate the health, growth and happiness of children and students.
Since the holiday is a celebration just for them, students in Japan look forward to this day where they get to relax and fun without most of the usual rules and routines. They know that their teachers, parents and grandparents will do special things to show them that they are loved.

Today, we will explore the history of this holiday and all the ways that Japanese families make May 5th special.
Where is Japan in relation to Texas?
This is a painting of a KOINOBORI flag.

REMEMBER: What was the significance of the Koinobori (Carp fish) to the Kodomo No Hi celebration?
What are the Koinobori a SYMBOL for?

This flag has been placed into a flower arrangement, creating a STILL-LIFE for the artist to paint.

What is a STILL-LIFE?
(How is it different from a PORTRAIT or a LANDSCAPE?)

The artist who painted this still-life was one of the founders of our museum (the Old Jail Art Center).
He and his cousin Reilly started the museum to display their family's art and artifacts for people in West Texas to come and see!

Bill and his parents loved to travel to Asia- especially to China and Japan.
Perhaps this Koinobori flag was a souvenir from one of his family's trips?
ORAGAMI is an ancient Japanese art of paper folding. Today we will each create an oragami KABUTO. (Samurai Helmet).

After we have folded our paper to create the 3D helmet, we will personalize our KABUTO with our initials in Japanese, as well as a KAMON (or "MON," for short)

A MON is a circular symbol or emblem that visual identifies a family or group in Japanese culture.
THINK: Brainstorm examples of this same idea from other world cultures. (An crest, symbol or pattern that visually identifies a family?)
In English/ British culture? In Scottish culture?
In Native American Culture? In Western American Ranching culture?

In many European cultures, only royal or wealthy family names had a family crest or symbol. In Japan, all family names, regardless of social class or wealth, had their own KAMON design. Each family Mon can be traced back thousands of years to the days of the Samurai.
Let's take a look at some traditional Mon's on the right.

After our ORIGAMI KABUTO are folded, you will design your own KAMON (family crest) inside the blank circle on your KABUTO. You can base your design on a traditional KAMON, or create your own- but your crest will not include text (letters or numbers)
This personalized helmet represents strength and success for you and your family!



("Koh-doh-moh-no Hee")
Children's Day
Kodomo No Hi
("Koh-doh-moh-no Hee")
Kodomo No Hi became a national holiday in 1948, but it has been a day of celebration in Japan since ancient times.

In addition to celebrating childhood (a time in life with less responsibility) this holiday is a time when parents make wishes and hopes for their children- primarily health, strength and success as they grow into adults.
The symbols and imagery of the holiday represent these themes.

Let's examine three of the most significant symbols of Kodomo No Hi.

KABUTO
(Samurai warrior helmet) and armor. Samurai uniforms represent bravery and strength. The KABUTO is a symbol for the hope of Japanese parents that their children will grow up to be brave and strong like the Samurai warriors of their country's past

SHOBU
(purple iris flowers). These rare flowers are believed to be a symbol for good luck and success. Their spear-shaped leaves are also said to symbolize the swords of the Samurai.

KOINOBORI
(carp fish). The Japanese consider the carp to be the most spirited fish -- so full of energy and power that it can fight its way up swift-running streams and cascades. Because of its strength and determination to overcome all obstacles, it stands for courage and the ability to attain high goals.
Koinobori are the most important symbol for this holiday. (Let's watch the short video on the right)
Symbols of Strength, Health
and Success
Kodomo No Hi became a national holiday in 1948, but it has been a day of celebration in Japan since ancient times.

In addition to celebrating childhood (a time in life with less responsibility) this holiday is a time when parents make wishes and hopes for their children- primarily health, strength and success as they grow into adults.
The symbols and imagery of the holiday represent these themes.

Let's examine three of the most significant symbols of Kodomo No Hi.

KABUTO
(Samurai warrior helmet) and armor. Samurai uniforms represent bravery and strength. The KABUTO is a symbol for the hope of Japanese parents that their children will grow up to be brave and strong like the Samurai warriors of their country's past

SHOBU
(purple iris flowers). These rare flowers are believed to be a symbol for good luck and success. Their spear-shaped leaves are also said to symbolize the swords of the Samurai.

KOINOBORI
(carp fish). The Japanese consider the carp to be the most spirited fish -- so full of energy and power that it can fight its way up swift-running streams and cascades. Because of its strength and determination to overcome all obstacles, it stands for courage and the ability to attain high goals.
Koinobori are the most important symbol for this holiday. (Let's watch the short video on the right)
Children's Day
Kodomo No Hi
Today we will each create a KOINOBORI flag like the ones that families use to decorate outside their homes for KODOMO NO HI.

We will all use different colors of bags to create our flags.

First, we will fold our bags and cut out an eye shape. Then we will cut shapes to create gills and patterns on our Koinobori fish.

When our designs are complete we will tape or glue a stick inside the flap of our bag to create a flag that we can wave!

We will wave our flags as we listen to the KOINOBORI song again!

When you go home you can show your family members how to make a Koinobori of their own, and tell them about this special family tradition during Kodomo No Hi in Japan!
Children's Day in Japan
("Koh-doh-moh-no hee")
Today, we will explore the history of this holiday and all the ways that Japanese families make May 5th special.
Kodomo No Hi is a Japanese holiday that is fun for kids and special for parents.
On this day, parents make wishes for their children. They hope that they grow up to be healthy, strong and successful!

For hundreds of years, Japanese parents have added a special decoration outside of their home on Kodomo No Hi.
KOINOBORI ("koy-no-boh-ree") are flags that look like a fish called a Koi, or carp!

Koi (Carp) are a strong, energetic and determined fish- they can swim against the water current and never give up!
For this reason, the carp are a SYMBOL for strength and success in Japanese culture.

Because Kodomo No Hi is about wishing for strong, healthy and successful children- Japanese parents fly KOINOBORI (carp flags) outside their houses on the holiday!
They hang one Koinobori (carp flag) for each parent and child in the family.
Let's look at the picture on the right to learn the order that the familiy flags hang on the flagpole!







Having a carp flag that represented her place in her family was important to Kimiko! Everyone wants to feel like an important part of their family!
Today,
the tradition has changed
in Japan and the
Kodomo No Hi
holiday is for both boys AND girls.
The family flag pole usually shows everyone who lives inside that home.

As their parents raise the family's carp flags in front of their home, children will sing a special song.
Let's listen to that song now. I have the words on the picture on the right so we can learn to sing along in Japanese!
Kodomo No Hi is for everyone!
Koinobori
Full transcript