Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Oh the Places You'll Go!

No description
by

Emily A.

on 30 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Oh the Places You'll Go!

By Emily A. Oh, the Places You'll Go!
`Dr. Seuss (1990) Significant events Reason and appeals Oh the Places You'll Go was Dr. Seuss's last published work. It can be inferred that this work was almost a reflection; Dr. Seuss was at the end of his life and looking back at all the experiences that got him there. The poem opens by expressing today is the day, a day to make decisions freely and just have fun! The poem also emphasizes that there will be struggles along the journey but there will always be an upside and things will work out for how they are supposed to be. Paraphrase and Purpose The historical context:
1990 is marked by many innovations. For instance, the cell phone and other technological advances were being made. This poem characterizes the hope that americans can do the things once thought impossible. Shifts in tone, overall mood &
Historical Context ~Repetition:
"Oh! The places you'll go"
~Rhyme:
Prevalent throughout the whole poem; however, there is a different rhyme scheme in each stanza
~Simile:
"You'll be famous as famous can be."
~Consonance:
"be your name Buxbaum or Bixby or Bray."
~Repetition: "Or"
~Pathos: Loneliness
All of these devices make the poem flow more smoothly and allow for more interpretation of the meaning. Sound and Literary devices Though Dr. Seuss is mainly known for writing children's books, many of his poems relate to more than just kids.

I chose this poem because it would be a fun and different way of interpreting the assignment. Also, the poem relates to us also because we will be on our own soon and in college. Sources http://www.teachpeace.com/drseussoftheplacesyoullgo.htm

The purpose of the poem is to emphasize to the reader that life is a long journey and sometimes there will be struggles and other times filled with great joy. The purpose is also to show that despite hardships it is a great day and everything will work out in the end. Tone:
The tone of this poem is ultimately cheerful and optimistic for the future with slight references to hardships and loneliness. Mood:
The mood of the poem overall is hopeful and happy, the poem is meant as an encouragement to the reader for the future.
Full transcript