Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

King Lear, Act 3, Scene 2

No description
by

Tori S

on 22 November 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of King Lear, Act 3, Scene 2

King Lear, Act 3, Scene 2
Section 2
Section 3
Here I stand your slave,
A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.
But yet I call you servile ministers,
That will with two pernicious daughters join
Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head
So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!
In the following soliloquy from Shakespeare’s King Lear, Lear is lamenting about the injustices in his life. He is experiencing family issues. Read the following monologue carefully. Then write a well-organized essay in which you analyze how Shakespeare uses elements of figurative language, diction, syntax, and tone to convey Lear’s unique response to his daughters’ actions.
Analysis
Section 1
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!

Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!

You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout

Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks

You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,

Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,

Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,

Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,

Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,

That makes ingrateful man!

Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!

Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters.

I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.

I never gave you kingdom, call’d you children,

You owe me no subscription. Then let fall

Your horrible pleasure. Here I stand your slave,

A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.

But yet I call you servile ministers,

That will with two pernicious daughters join

Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head

So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!
The tone is challenging and angry.
The tone starts to shift to a more hopeless one.
The tone is critical and self loathing.
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters.
I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.
I never gave you kingdom, call’d you children,
You owe me no subscription. Then let fall
Your horrible pleasure. Here I stand your slave,
A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.
But yet I call you servile ministers,
That will with two pernicious daughters join
Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head
So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!

Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters.
I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.
I never gave you kingdom, call’d you children,
You owe me no subscription. Then let fall
Your horrible pleasure.
Conclusion
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters.
I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.
I never gave you kingdom, call’d you children,
You owe me no subscription. Then let fall
Your horrible pleasure. Here I stand your slave,
A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.
But yet I call you servile ministers,
That will with two pernicious daughters join
Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head
So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Shakespeare further
personifies the storm.
This statement expresses Lear's challenging tone.
Here I stand your slave,
A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.
But yet I call you servile ministers,
That will with two pernicious daughters join
Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head
So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!
Here I stand your slave,
A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.
But yet I call you servile ministers,
That will with two pernicious daughters join
Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head
So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!
Here I stand your slave,
A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.
But yet I call you servile ministers,
That will with two pernicious daughters join
Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head
So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!
This is a pivotal point in the soliloquy, as Shakespeare uses imagery to portray Lear's shift to a feeling of self pity. He sees himself as a worthless old man.
Thesis
Shakespeare represents King Lear’s emotional state of mind of anger and turbulence through Lear’s exclamations and statements towards the storm.
Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters.
I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.
I never gave you kingdom, call’d you children,
You owe me no subscription. Then let fall
Your horrible pleasure.
Lear states that he is not acting surly towards the storm because unlike his daughters, the storm doesn't owe him anything as he has never done anything for it and it has no obligations to treat him better. He says this, as he is angry at his daughters who he has provided for and expects them to cooperate in return.
Through Shakespeare’s personification of the storm, Lear’s emotional state is revealed. He has his own storm brewing inside of him, making him feel enraged and upset with how humans act towards each other. His daughters caused him to lose hope in humanity and realize that all humans are ungrateful and carry characteristics that need to be altered. Shakespeare's many instances of using
exclamatory statements helps emphasize the emotions that Lear feels that range from anger to
self pity.
Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters.
I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.
I never gave you kingdom, call’d you children,
You owe me no subscription. Then let fall
Your horrible pleasure.
Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire are my daughters.
I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness.
I never gave you kingdom, call’d you children,
You owe me no subscription. Then let fall
Your horrible pleasure.
Due to his daughters' behavior, Lear places blame on Nature by stating that the "moulds", that such unappreciative people are derived from, need to be eliminated.
Shakespeare uses the storm as a juxtaposition to King Lear’s inner turmoil. As Lear ventures out into the storm, he has many strong, pent up emotions that he makes evident through his cries of “crack your cheeks” and “rage! and blow!”. Shakespeare emphasizes this by the use of exclamatory statements. Lear often says the word “you” while addressing the storm, in such allegations as, “You cataracts…”, “Till you have drench’d our steeples…”, and “You sulph’rous…”. Shakespeare personifies the storm in order to express King Lear’s emotional distress. Lear’s family troubles cloud his mind much like a “hurricanoe” swirls and destroys with its strong storm winds. He challenges the storm, “singe my white head”, due to his emotional stress and the fact that he does not care what happens to him anymore. The storm being used as a force to show that Lear does not care anymore because of the ever present storm raging inside of him. Then, he goes further by blaming nature by saying “Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once, That makes ingrateful man!”. Due to his daughters’ outrageous behavior, Lear believes that Nature and its “moulds” for men are at fault for the atrocious attributes of man. Lear further displays his lament through his exclamation of “Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!”. Lear laments in a challenging and angry tone, being disappointed with his daughters.

Lear's angry and challenging tone is further emphasized through exclamatory statements.
He challenges the storm to strike more
lightening and pour down more rain.

Approach To Argumentative Paragraph
Once again, personification is utilized
in order to give the storm human
attributes. In this part, it is made to be
an actual person, one that has done
nothing to Lear and owes him nothing.
Here, Lear actually accuses the storm itself of being his daughters' agents, who serve them and take their sides.
King Lear establishes that the elements
and the storm are not his daughters. These
are the forces that can cause him harm and he
will not care because they will not hurt him
in the emotional way that his daughters have.
1. Exclamatory sentences, once again, express Lear's disposition.
King Lear uses short, exclamatory statements
in order to express his disgust in the 'agents'
of the storm and his daughters. He is unable
to say more than this because he is exasperated
from these events.
Lear further emphasizes the idea of the storm being his daughters servants, by saying that it can join his deadly daughters and use its celestial forces against his aging self.
Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow!
You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout
Till you have drench’d our steeples, drown’d the cocks
You sulph’rous and thought-executing fires,
Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts,
Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder,
Strike flat the thick rotundity o’ th’ world,
Crack Nature’s moulds, all germains spill at once,
That makes ingrateful man!
Rumble thy bellyful! Spit, fire! spout, rain!
Personification of storm and exclamatory sentences are utilized to express his enraged tone.
2. He also further personifies the storm, in relation to his daughters.
3. Explanation of his speech, telling the storm
that only his ungrateful daughters owe him
gratitude.
Approach To Argumentative Paragraph
1. How Lear is a "slave" to his
2. Imagery used to display Lear's feeling
3. How King Lear shifts to believe that the
4. The use of short, exclamatory
of self pity.
daughters.
storm is helping his ungrateful daughters
sentences to portray King Lear's
disgust and annoyance
out.
Here I stand your slave,
A poor, infirm, weak, and despis’d old man.
But yet I call you servile ministers,
That will with two pernicious daughters join
Your high-engender’d battles ‘gainst a head
So old and white as this! O! O! ’tis foul!
Lear expresses himself as the storm's "slave" meaning that he believes he is a 'slave' to his daughters, by always providing for them, and receiving nothing in return.
Prompt
Full transcript