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What Changes Were Made to the Royal Navy During the Tudor an

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alexander nash

on 27 January 2015

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Transcript of What Changes Were Made to the Royal Navy During the Tudor an

Thank you for listening
written by

Alexander Nash
and Elliott Oates
designed by Péter Puklus for Prezi
What Changes Were Made to the Royal Navy During the Tudor and Stuart period?
Henry VIII
The start of the change
The start of the change cont
King Henry VIII also created a great chain of coastal fortresses in the 1540s to defend England against the threat of invasion. An invasion came during his reign when there were French landings on the English coast between 1545 and 1546. Due to the actions of Henry VIII and the establishment of the Tudor navy and the coastal forts the French were defeated.
The forts
The Dockyards
Where were the ships built?
The River Thames was far more important for transport in Tudor times, so it was a good place to put new dockyards for building ships. The South of England was also a good place to get the materials for building. All ships were built of wood, which meant that very many trees were needed, and there were still quite large forests in parts of Kent and Sussex. Henry VIII started new shipbuilding yards at Deptford and Woolwich.
Although there is no evidence for a conscious change of policy, Henry VII soon embarked on a program of building ships larger than before.Henry VIII inherited a force of some 15 ships, and continued expansion in "great ships", like the Mary Rose.
The Royal Navy was developed by Henry VIII who became known as the father of the English Navy. The English Royal navy changed and expanded under his reign from bieng just five ships to being around 60 ships at the end of his reign.
The Royal Navy was developed by Henry VIII was allowed to decline under his two immediate successors, the young King Edward VI (r 1547 - 1553) and Queen Mary I, Bloody Mary, (r.1553-1558). In 1548 there were 53 ships in the Fleet, with a total tonnage of about 11,000. By 1558 there were only 26, with a tonnage of little more than 7,000. During the first half of Queen Elizabeth's reign (r.1558-1603), the numbers were not increased

The Pepy's and the Stuart navy


At the centre of the history of the Stuart Navy is Samuel Pepys, author of the famous diary. To a large extent, it was due to his hard work and genius for organisation that the navy began to change from a corrupt and inefficient service into a powerful fighting force. As a result of his work, Pepys is often described as 'the father of the modern Royal Navy'.


The start of the Stuart Navy
James I (James VI of Scotland) inherited a naval system from his cousin Queen Elizabeth I. There was no full-time 'standing' force as we know it today. Instead, in times of national emergency, such as when the Spanish Armada threatened England, a few royal ships and many more privately owned merchant vessels combined together to form a loosely knit fighting force. The commanders would be mainly military leaders rather than professional sailor
The Mary Rose, the sinking
Henry VII
Henry VII deserves a large share of credit in the establishment of a standing navy. Although there is no evidence for a conscious change of policy, Henry soon embarked on a program of building ships larger than heretofore. He also invested in dockyards, and commissioned the oldest surviving dry dock in 1495 at Portsmouth,[1] with Sweepstake the first ship built there.
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