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Diction in Of Mice and Men

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Jessica Khaskheli

on 11 March 2014

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Transcript of Diction in Of Mice and Men

Example #1
Example: "He wore a work glove on his left hand, and,
like the boss,
he
wore high-heeled boots
."(Steinbeck 25)

Example #2
Example: "His arms gradually bent at the elbows and his hands
closed into fists
. He
stiffened
and
went into a slight crouch
."(25)
Example #4
Example: "His glance was at once
calculating
and
pugnacious
."(25)
Example #7
Example: "You seen a girl around here?" he
demanded angrily
. George said coldly. " 'Bout half an hour ago maybe." "Well what the hell was she doin'?" George stood still, watching the
angry little man
. He said insultingly, "She said- she was lookin' for you." Curley seemed really to see George for the first time. His eyes
flashed
over George, took in his height, measured his reach, looked at his trim middle. "Well, which way'd she go?" he demanded at last. (36-37)
Diction in
Of Mice and Men

Portraying Curley
Example #5
Example #5
Example #6
Definition of '
pugnacious
'
showing a readiness or desire to fight or argue
Definition of '
lashed
'
to move violently or suddenly
Example: "Curley's pretty
handy
. He done quite a bit in the ring. He's a
lightweight
, and he's handy." (26)
Example: "
Curley's like a lot of little guys
. He hates big guys.
He's alla time picking scraps with big guys
. Kind of like he's mad at em' because he ain't a big guy.You seen little guys like that, ain't you? Always
scrappy
?" (26)
Example: "S'pose Curley jumps a big guy an' licks him. Ever'body says what a game guy Curley is. And s'pose he does the same thing and gets licked. Then ever'body says the big guy oughtta pick on somebody his own size, and maybe they gang up on the big guy. Never did seem right to me. Seems like Curley ain't givin' anybody a chance." (26-27)
How?
How?
Why?
He uses
indirect diction
to express Curley's mean spirit.
He uses it to
show
that Curley's actions define his personality.
And he also uses it to
show
how aggressive Curley is already.
How?
Why?
He uses this example to emphasize how aggressive

Curley is.
He also uses this example to show that Curley uses violence and aggressiveness to intimidate other people.
How?
Why?
He uses this to show that Curley is always looking for ways to get in a fight and prove his strength.
He
tells
Curley thinks that he's capable of fending for himself.
Also, to tell the reader that Curley is careful to mark himself as stronger than men larger than him.
How?
Why?
To show that Curley get's his way one way or another
He uses intimidation to emphasize his masculinity
Definition of '
scrappy
'
having an aggressive and determined spirit
How?
Why?
He uses
direct diction
to once again, emphasize Curley's aggressiveness.
This is also stereotypical.
To wrap it up...

Steinbeck used these examples to portray Curley as...
Aggressive
Possessive
Violent
Small
Mean-Spirited
Confrontational
Why?
How?
Example #3
Why?
He uses this to emphasize Curley's aggressive behavior.
He also uses this example to emphasize Curley's anger and violence.
Example: "Curley
lashed
his body around."(25)
How?
Why?
This implies that Curley wants to set himself aside from the other men/field workers.
This also implies that he wants to represent himself in a boss like style.
Steinbeck uses
direct diction
.
He
tells
you what Curley is wearing.
He describes Curley's physical appearance.
Steinbeck helps the reader visualize Curley's appearance.
He describes what people wore back in those times.
The author uses
indirect diction
.
He describes Curley's actions so that the reader is able to portray the character(Curley) better
The author use
indirect diction
.
This example
shows
you the action Curley is taking
It helps the reader visualize Curley better.
Indirect diction
Describing what kind of person Curley is
Describing what other people think of Curley
Steinbeck is using
indirect diction
.
He describes his actions and implies aggressive behavior.
The author is using
direct diction
.
Candy is
telling
the reader about how Curley is 'handy'.
'
Handy
' means...

Curley is good in a fight and won't shy away from one.
Steinbeck uses
direct diction
.
In this example he is
telling
you that Curley is aggressive just like other little guys.
Again, this an example of
indirect diction
.
This
shows
you that Curley is possessive because of his actions(which are described to the reader).
The author uses this to show that Curley is possessive with his wife.
He shows his wife off to emphasize his masculinity because he physically, isn't that big.
He thinks he has that masculine power to control and 'own' her when in reality he's chasing after her and looking for her which means he doesn't actually have that power.
This also
shows
how Curley is confrontational.
Definition of '
calculating
'
acting in a scheming and ruthlessly determined way
Full transcript