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Everglades and El Yungue Presentation

An overview of the ecosystem of the Everglades and El Yungue
by

Ryan Taylor

on 7 March 2013

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Transcript of Everglades and El Yungue Presentation

Ecoscenarios Research Project
Evergledes, El Yunque
By Abby & Vanessa! Environment El Yunque:
National Forest What Kind of Environment is
Your Ecosystem? Links for Everglades •http://www.nps.gov/ever/naturescience/evergeology.htm
•http://www.everglades.national-park.com/
•http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geology/geologictopics/hazards/earthquakes.htm
•http://www.applesnail.net/
•http://www.allaboutbirds.org/
•http://www.felid.org/
•http://fcelter.fiu.edu/research/working_groups/?wg=6&p=FCEI
•http://www.everglades.org/invasive-species/
•http://www.nps.gov/ever/naturescience/nonnativespecies.htm Everglades National Park Large volcanic island Geology Type of Bedrock: Limestone
Biome: Wetlands
Volcano or Earthquake Activity: no volcanoes and little to no earthquakes. Location Longitude: 26 N
Latitude: 80.7 W
Elevation: 6.1 Meters
Climate: Tropical El Yungue Links Water/Precipitation Water: Fresh River
Temperature: High, on average
Precipitation: High, on average Geology Abiotic Factors Type of Bedrock:
Igneous Land Formations:
Volcanos Mountains Rain: Provides water for organisms to live.
Mud: Gives a home for insects, microbes, and other small organisms.
Rocks: Gives multiple minerals that can be important for life, and can provide shelter for small organisms. Earthquake Activity Food Web Invasive Species Location: Longitude: 18.63 N
Latitude: 66.45 W Elevation: 3,543 Ft Climate: Tropical Burmese Python: Overeats, hurting the bird and rodent population.
Walking Catfish: Gluttonous non-native bottom feeder.
Zebra Mussel: Breeds quickly, causing harm to native species. Water: Most important limiting factors of the everglades ecosystem Fresh Water There are...
Rivers
Lakes
Streams 1. Numer of speies: Controls all populations. 2. Predation: Keeps lower order consumers relatively low, and provides energy to the higher order consumers 3. Disease: Drops population rapidly if population gets to high 4. Diet: If you can't eat something, you might starve! Temperature
Rain: Gives organisms water supply
Sun Limiting Factors: 1. Very moist: Animals must adapt to it or they aren't able to live there.

2. Hunting: People hunt and kill the animals, keeping the population from growing.

3. Loss of Habitat: Forest is cut down, keeping the populations from growing because of little space

4. Diet: The amount and types of food can either make the population grow or decrease. Advantageous Adaptations Mosquitofish gives birth to live young; this eliminates need for special environments.
Apple snails can hide inside of their shells, preventing predation from many predators.
Coyotes have become nocturnal, allowing them to suprise their prey.
Ahingas can dive in order to catch deep fish. the tree of Life and pie Food Wed! Some Adaptations Needed To Live In El Yunque: Food Web Compare and Contrast 3 Most Important Abiotic Factors 1. Rain: Gives the organisms the water they need.

2. Sun: Gives the trees and plants the nutrients they need to grow.

3. Mud: There are a lot of insects and frogs that live in the mud so it gives them a place to live. Temperature average:
High 3. Pollution: May cause birth defects in animals, and can alter climate. Environment similarities and differences Geology Percipitation Average:
High Location Water Abiotic Factors http://www.fs.usda.gov/elyunque http://www.topuertorico.org/reference/yunque.shtml http://www.solboricua.com/elyunque/ http://www.elboricua.com/BoricuaKids_ElYunque.html Human Impact on El Yunque Positive: Negative: Millions of trees are cut down each year and there is a lot of air pollution. Many of the animals are also taken from the forest and sold. The Puerto Rican parrot's population has decreased a lot because of many or taken from their habitat and sold. Laws have been inforced to keep people from hurting animals and taking them. COQUI FROG: they have sticky palms so that they wont slip when they climd on trees with water on them SPHAERODACTYLUS GECKO: The toes of the gecko have a special adaptation that allows them to stick to wet surfaces without any liquids. SCOLOPENDRA CENTIPEDE: has poison in its legs and stick legs so it can dig and climb 1. 2. 3. Average Temp. Average Precipitation 4. The Everglades have limestone bedrock. El Yunque has igneous bedrock. 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CARACOLUS SNAIL: a snails slime makes thing slip wile chasing them The following statement is true. The previous statement is false. El Yunque has both volcanic and earthquake activity. The Everglades has neither. El Yunque is 1073.8 meters above the Everglades. The Everglades are at an elevation of 6.1 meters above sea level, while El Yunque is at an elevation of 1079.9 meters above sea level. Both ecosystems generally have the same abiotic factors. Both have high temperature and precipitation. However, water formations are slightly different. For example, El Yunque has lakes, the Everglades do not. Adaptations Food Webs Both have exceedingly complex food webs, with 15+ organisms. On the Everglades food web, shown earlier, only a fraction of the organisms present in the ecosystem are shown. El Yunque National park and The Everglades National Park No two adaptions between species in either ecosystem is remotely similar. One thing that can be noted, however, is that the most interesting adaptions in El Yunque happen to the lizards and amphibians. In the Everglades, the animals that get interesting adaptions vary incredibly, from coyotes to snails.
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