Loading presentation...
Prezi is an interactive zooming presentation

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Trade Networks: Silk Road, Indian Ocean, and Trans-Saharan

thIS MAKES ME WANT TO DIE
by

LKSA APWH

on 9 April 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Trade Networks: Silk Road, Indian Ocean, and Trans-Saharan

Trade Networks: Silk Road, Indian Ocean, and Trans-Saharan
Ara Azatian, Shanaz Khosti, Loida Navas, Kimia Yousefpour
Gold+Salt
Products
Religion
Camels
Diffusion
Trade Markets + goods
Bannanas
Religion
Trade Technology

Manicheism
Syncretism
Religion
Foods + spices
Culture
Economics
Tech
Desease
Diffusion
Silk Road
Indian Ocean Basin
Period 2: 600 BCE - 600 CE
Economic
Silk, porcelain - China
Spices, gems, cotton - India
Horses, copper & dates- Arabia
Gold and ivory - E Africa
Economic
Spread from India:
Cotton, and textile
High carpet steels (swords and knives)
Spread of bananas from Southeast Asia to Middle East
Religion
Arab merchants --> diffusion of Islam to India
Diffusion of Islam from India to Southeast Asia
Diffusion of Hinduism and Buddhism
Social
Specialization of labor
Merchants -
vaishyas
Trading class
3 Legs of the Trade
Eastern Africa, and Middle East with India
India to Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia to Canton
Emporia - Indian port cities

Knowledge of Monsoon winds
Lateen sails and
dhow
ships
Interactions and Technology
Political support and foundation
Direct military links
India - central position
Arab merchants
Political
Period 3: 600 - 1450
Political
Change in power
Before: Arab merchants and India
Now: Chinese domination
Zheng He
Trade --> economic growth --> emergence of kingdoms
Great Zimbabwe
Diffusion
Diffusion of Indian goods into world markets
Cotton and textile
Sugar refining, leather tanning, stone carving, carpet weaving
High carpet steels (swords and knives)
Diffusion of bananas originated in Southeast Asia to Middle East

Diffusion of Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism

Economic
Goods
Ivory, diamonds, gold: E Africa to Persians & Arabs
Copper, textile, & horses: Arab merchants to E Africa
Gems, salt, elephants, cotton from India
Economic
Silk, porcelain, and paper from China
Silver from Japan
Slaves from East Africa
Religion
Diffusion of Islam --> Islam's dominance in Indonesia and E Africa
Buddhism in SE Asia
Srivijaya's Buddhist temple
Diffusion of Hinduism to SE Asia --> syncretism of Hinduism and Buddhism
Diffusion
Syncretism Sahara
Berber religion
Syncretism
Big Picture
Mass trading of slaves throughout regions
High interaction rates between nearby neighboring regions=Globalization
Standardized labor and large business
E Asia opens for the world
Technological advances/ Geographic knowledge

Trans-Saharan Trade
Political
Shifting of power to the East
Gold
main focus
Oases
Economics
Linked Mediterranean Societies
trade between gold and salt
camels and dependence on oases
Religion

Berber people and traditional religion
polytheistic
PERIOD 3 600 CE- 1450 CE
Politics
Enriched Sub-Saharan African Kingdoms
Ghana --> Mali --> Songhai


Economics
Northern Africa
empire prospers financially and culturally
Gold Trade & Slave Trade
Ghana & Mali
Slaves served as domestic servants or warriors
Religion
Influence from Arab merchants
Ghana= Islam based
Caliphate
Social
Slave trade
Used for work labor
and as military

population growth
booming economy
Interactions
Migrations, diffusion
Arabic language
Berber traders increased contact
with Islam
Arts and technology
Camel Saddle
Bactrian camels
Works Cited
Period 4: 1450 CE-1750 CE
Political
Trade shifted
Wealthier European merchants
Moroccan troops attack Timbuktu
Economics
Trade reduced after destruction caused by Moroccans
railroads built, Trans-Sahara not seen as burden anymore
Politics period 2, 600 B.C-600 C.E
Countries were more open to each other
Tang Dynasty Ruled China
Golden Age of the Silk Road
Economics
Silk=desired good
Trade of Spices for precious metals
New foods
Flying cash
Religion
Spread of Christianity, Buddhism, Islam and Hinduism
Social
Merchants did not travel straight across
Silk Diffused into Central Asia
Patriarchal society
Interactions
Invention of paper
Irrigation water wheel
Caravans
Bubonic Plague spread though rats
Arts
Framed
Medallion
Water ewer
Diffused from China to Mexico
Silk Road Political Period 3
Silk Road revived
Collapse of Han Dynasty
Collapse of Tang Dynasty
Collapse of the Silk Road

Economics
Demand for silk grew
China dependence on Silk Road profit
Silk Road Decline
Bubonic plague
Religion
Manicheism "Religion of Light"
Neo-Confucianism
Continuity of the spread of Islam, Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism
Social
Specialization labor
Merchants enjoyed higher status
Slaves were traded from East Africa
Interactions and Technology
Diasportic communities
Diasporic cities
Swahili city-states
Mecca, Hormuz, Calicut, Melaka, Canton, and Hangzhou
Canton
Melaka
Mombasa
Technology
Chinese junks
Lateen-sailed dhows
Better knowledge of Monsoon winds
Astrolabe and magnetic compass
Art
Art, culture, music, and etc. of people of Swahili states grew differently from others in Africa
New forms of baking
checks etc.
Minting coins
Printing paper money
Period 4: 1450 CE - 175CE
Political
European domination
Trading-post empires
Conflicts
Economic
Growth in volume of trade
Joint-stock companies
Europe's economic role in Asia
Slave trade
Religion
Christian missionaries
Continuity of diffusion of Islam
Social
Continuity of slave trade
Interactions and Technology
Knowledge about global world
No more middle men
Revised and more accurate maps
Bentley, Jerry H., and Herbert F. Ziegler. Traditions Encounters.
Boston: McGraw Hill, 2000. Print.
McCannon, John, and Inc Series. Barron's AP World History. 5th ed.
Hauppauge, N.Y.: Barrons Educational Series, 2014. Print.


Preview
Silk Road, Indian Ocean, and Tran-Saharan in different time periods
Rise and decline of trade routes
PERSIA
Full transcript