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English 499/830

Course notes and schedule for English 499/830 at the University of Regina, fall 2014.
by

Kate Cushon

on 3 February 2015

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Transcript of English 499/830

English
Kate Cushon
kate.cushon@uregina.ca
This
includes links, articles,and other information.

General &
Misc.

Week 1
Week 3
Week 4
Week 5
Week 8
Week 9
Week 10
Week 6
Week 12
September 9
September 23
September 30
October 7
November 4
November 18
November 25
October 14
October 28
A small
assignment...
What aspects of research do you find easiest and most familiar? What aspects are most daunting or unfamiliar? Answer in 300-500 words.
Due next week.
Data, Information, Knowledge
Documents
Organization of Information
What Is A Document?
Buckland, M. (1997) What is a document?
Data
Information
Knowledge
increasing complexity, abstraction, context
Metadata
and
metacontent
data
about
data
structural metadata
descriptive metadata
Berndt, F. (2009) Revisiting "What is a document?"
See also:
http://libproxy.uregina.ca:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/217973807?accountid=13480
http://libproxy.uregina.ca:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/216902005?accountid=13480
traces the history of the concept
from "document" to "documentation" and back
objects are documents if one is informed by them
from Briet (1951):
star in sky = not a document
photo of star = document
stone in river = not a document
stone in museum = document
animal in wild = not a document
animal in zoo = document
Duyvis (1942): spiritual dimension; documents are "repository of expressed thought"
Ranganathan (1963): metaphysical dimension; documents are "embodied micro-thought" on "a flat surface"
later adapted to include "macro" thought, and whether "the physical embodiment is exclusive to one work or is shared by more than one work", i.e. distributed, as in audio-visual
Otlet (1990): anthropological dimension; material culture that constitutes evidence can be a document
Dufrenne (1973): distinction between aesthetic objects and signifying objects
http://informationscienceantelope.tumblr.com/
Latin "datum" = "something given"
on its own, carries no meaning
are there data in humanities? in literary studies?
See also:
Mitra, A. (2012). Classifying data for successful modeling.
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.dwbiconcepts.com/data-warehousing/12-data-modelling/101-classifying-data-for-successful-modeling.html
Drucker, J. (2011). Humanities approaches to graphical display.
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/5/1/000091/000091.html
Latin "informatio" = formation, i.e. of an idea
not given; resolves uncertainty
what is information in the humanities? literary studies?
See also:
Floridi, L. (2005). Is semantic information meaningful data?
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://philsci-archive.pitt.edu/2536/1/iimd.pdf
Moretti, F. (2011). Network theory, plot analysis.
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://newleftreview.org/II/68/franco-moretti-network-theory-plot-analysis
Old High German "-knāen" (to recognize or comprehend) + Old English "-lāc" (suffix denoting the action thereof)
Plato = "justified true belief"
familiarity or understanding through experience or education
a priori vs. a posteriori
tacit vs. explicit
What constitutes "knowledge" in humanities or literary studies?
What are some facets of literary knowledge?
i.e. communicable? expressible via language? printable? recordable/recorded?
Examples of metadata:
library catalogues
cameras that add info to photo files
tags (incl. hashtags)
census information
digital music files
System-centred vs. user-centred
Classification vs. cataloguing
Information retrieval
recall
precision
Information behaviour
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.creighton.edu/fileadmin/user/HSL/docs/ref/Searching_-_Recall_Precision.pdf
recall =
# of relevant records retrieved
# of relevant records in the database
precision =
# of relevant records retrieved
total records retrieved
Inversely related: as recall improves, precision gets worse, and vice versa.
See also:
See also:
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01449290310001624329#.Ugqvoax3XHQ
User-centred design (UCD) = users are consulted or considered at every stage of design
Most libraries ostensibly ascribe to user-centred systems.
Classification =
identifying similarities
grouping similar items together
i.e. Dewey Decimal System
Cataloguing =
creates a record about what is unique about the item being catalogued
i.e.:
a card in a card catalogue
a record in an OPAC
Rice, J. (2013). Occupying the digital humanities.
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1325024278
Carole L. Palmer, C., and Neumann, L. (2002). The Information Work of Interdisciplinary Humanities Scholars: Exploration and Translation.
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/4309582
finds that humanities scholars explore unfamiliar subjects and translate info for use in humanities
three facets identified (p. 98):
"First, scholars have a select core of resources that is central to their work, but their actual paths of inquiry are variant and unpredictable."
"Second, scholars practice multiple types of reading, and these activities are intertwined with the writing process."
"Third, technologies are adopted when they fit into or enhance established patterns of research."
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2005.04.005
Barett, A. (2005). The information-seeking habits of graduate student researchers in the humanities.
defies stereotype that humanities researchers shun electronic search tools
collaboration when warranted
importance of primary sources, and the challenges posed by electronic search tools
citation chasing and browsing physical stack as important modes of discovery
initially vague research goals
time constraints as major limiter of research goals
perceived differences from undergrad: knowing how to find things, confidence, research rather than just completing an assignment
http://libproxy.uregina.ca:2048/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/216897923?accountid=13480
Siegfried, S., Bates, M., and Wilde, D. (1993). A Profile of End-User Searching Behavior by Humanities Scholars: The Getty Online Searching Project Report No. 2
cohorts of humanities scholars trained in online searching (DIALOG)
1/5th of scholars gave up on it entirely
the rest did unassisted searches later on
preference for natural language searching (as opposed to Boolean or controlled vocabulary)
lack of synonym use (OR searches)
learning and increased sophistication over time, especially with support and training; however, errors persisted
"To make automated information systems more appealing and easier to use for humanities scholars constitutes an exciting challenge for information researchers in the coming years." (p. 289)
Entrance reflection
due today at start of class.
See last week (or syllabus) for reflection topic and instructions.
Entrance Reflection
Outline and Assignments
Accessibility
Any student with a disability, injury or illness who feels they may need academic accommodation should discuss this with the course instructor after contacting the Centre for Student Accessibility, located in Riddell Centre 251, telephone 306-585-4631, e-mail accessibility@uregina.ca.
Info Lit:
Grants/SSHRC:
Readings:
Readings:
Readings:
Readings:
Definition of information literacy:
http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency
Standards, performance indicators, and outcomes:
http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency#stan
Information Literacy
Definitions
Standards, performance indicators, and outcomes
Info Lit Assessment Exercises
Complicating factors
Information Literacy
in Literary Research
(For consultation only - latest print handout should be treated as authoritative.)
Writing a grant application
Note: SSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada) will be covered, since most literary scholarship is covered by SSHRC.
If you are interested in other grant agencies or other subject areas, please let me know.
Association of College & Research Libraries
(ACRL)
Most common standard adopted in N. American universities/colleges
Starts with general information literacy
"An information literate individual is able to:
Determine the extent of information needed
Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
Evaluate information and its sources critically
Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally"

Research Basics
Aspects
Information technology
Higher education
aware of information housed in technology
able to use technologies for finding
able to learn new technologies
establishes higher ed. as "seat" of information literacy and lifelong learning
defines roles
integration in curriculum
http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency#stan
Updates
http://www.acrl.ala.org/acrlinsider/archives/7329
"Rethinking ACRL’s Information Literacy Standards"
recommendations:
simplification
lose library jargon
focus more on emotional, less on cognitive outcomes
complementary literacies
move beyond format
students as content curators
bridge with the American Association of School Librarians’ "Standards for the 21st Century Learner"
Task Force report
http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/standards/ils_recomm.pdf
ACRL "Literatures in English" section
http://www.ala.org/acrl/aboutacrl/directoryofleadership/sections/les/leshomepage
Research standards: (2007)
http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/standards/competency_guidelines_LES.pdf
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/pedagogy/v006/6.3reed.html
"Layering Knowledge: Information Literacy as Critical Thinking in the Literature Classroom"
Information literacy as social/citizenship issue:
http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/whitepapers/presidential
intersectionality
race
class
immigration status
etc.
empowerment and enfranchisement
engaged citizens
Employability
From a labour/capital economy to an information economy.
1. Information literacy self-assessments
solo

2. Information literacy for literary research
pairs
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/article/view/197
"A comparison of UK academics' conceptions of information literacy in two disciplines: English and Marketing"
English:
Accessing and retrieving textual information
Using IT to access and retrieve information
Possessing basic research skills and knowing how and when to use them
Becoming confident, autonomous learners and critical thinkers
Marketing:
Accessing information quickly and easily to
be aware of what’ s going on;
Using IT to work with information;
Possessing a set of information skills and applying them to the task in hand;
Using information literacy to solve real-world problems;
Becoming a critical thinker;
Becoming a confident, independent practitioner

Further reading:
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.lirgjournal.org.uk/lir/ojs/index.php/lir/article/view/197
"The English literature researcher in the age of the Internet"
Conclusions:
online materials seen as more student-oriented than research-oriented
researchers reluctant to publish online
information literacy and comfort levels with online resources
Controlled vocabulary
Subject Searching
Suggested:
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/apply-demande/index-eng.aspx
How to apply:
SSHRC home page:
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/home-accueil-eng.aspx
Forms:
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/forms-formulaires/index-eng.aspx
Types of material
Finding tools
Applied information literacy
Research Plans
Getting started

Forms


Examples


Tips and Advice


About SSHRC

monographs
print
digital
other
periodicals
journals
newspapers
magazines
audio-visual
micromaterials
sound recordings
video recordings
first editions
contemporary editions
correspondence
diaries and papers
ephemera
pamphlets
posters
playbills
penny dreadfuls etc.
print
electronic
discs
web
OPACs
databases
indexes
what is my information need?
kind of information?
scope of information?
where do I find it?
how do I find it?
how valid and useful is this information?
does this information meed my needs?
how will I use this information?
have all legal and ethical concerns been satisfied?
...found it!
examples:
http://www.utexas.edu/academic/ctl/assessment/iar/research/plan/examples/ex-plan.pdf
http://www-distance.syr.edu/qualproposal.html
guides:
http://library.bcu.ac.uk/learner/writingguides/1.07.htm
http://www.sis.uta.fi/~ucit/About%20research%20plan%204.pdf
Formal written (or typed)
plan, outlining goals and methods.
Guided tours of some basic library resources...
(suggested)
Boolean searching
http://computer.howstuffworks.com/boolean.htm
Computer Boolean logic:
Basic Boolean searching "cheat sheet":
http://www.ithacalibrary.com/sp/subjects/boolean
Digging Deeper
Unusual and hard-to-find resources
source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/sterlingely/
locate and access obscure collections
the role of experience
Worldcat
Controlled vs. uncontrolled
tags
subject headings
subject terms
related subjects
thesaurus
indexing
source: http://xkcd.com/575/
Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH)
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)
Sears "Standard Catalog for Public Libraries"
In library databases:
"Thesaurus" refers to a list of controlled vocabulary terms that can be used in searches, or browsed.
In libraries:
In publications:
a list of notable subjects or references in a longer work; usually compiled by the author
a document that lists and otherwise identifies other documents, usually in a specific category
a print volume that serves as a finding tool for other print volumes
subject indexing in databases and other finding tools
Boolean
AND OR NOT
AND
- connects otherwise unrelated concepts
- narrows search; fewer results
Looking for Victorian pamphlets
Victorian pamphlets
AND
OR
- connects synonyms
- broadens search; more results
Search concept =Victorian
Victorian nineteenth-century
OR
NOT
- search for the first term while excluding results that include the second term
Researching non-christian faiths in England
religion Christianity
NOT
Phrase Searching
All the words, in that order.
Useful for titles.
" " ( )
"The Illustrated London News"
(pax britannica)
"great exhibition"
Try "tips" "help" etc.
Truncation and Wildcard
Truncation usually replaces letters at the end of a word
* ? [other symbols]
Christian?
=
Christian, Christians, Christianity...
Wildcard usually refers to replacing letters anywhere
wom*n
=
woman, women
YMMV
different databases do different things
tips, help, FAQs, etc.
symbol may replace one letter or many
a.k.a The Full Meal Deal
Boolean
+
Controlled Vocabulary
Operators connect terms
Boolean Worksheet
1. Formulate a research question or statement.
2. Break down your question into concepts.
3. Write your concepts in the first column.
4. Determine synonyms for the subsequent columns.
Order of Operations:
OR
AND
not
Information Theory
Advanced Research
Grant Writing Workshop
Please bring a copy of a draft SSHRC application
It can be just a rough outline.
But the more complete it is, the better the feedback.
You can email it to Kate ahead of time if you don't want to bother printing it out.
Readings:
(Same as two weeks ago, in case you need a refresher)
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/apply-demande/index-eng.aspx
How to apply:
SSHRC home page:
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/home-accueil-eng.aspx
Forms:
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/forms-formulaires/index-eng.aspx
Guidelines:
(suggestions, not rules)
2 pages, single spaced, 12-pt font
Content:
Headings:
not required, but potentially useful
Works Cited:
do cite things in your content, and include a Works Cited list if able, but not necessary
On site visit to Athol Murray College of Notre Dame archives.
Located in Wilcox, SK.
Athol Murray College of Notre Dame website:
http://www.notredame.sk.ca/index.php
Saskatchewan Network for Art Collecting:
http://www.sknac.ca/index.php?page=GalleryDetail&id=15
The Canadian Encyclopedia:
http://thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/athol-murray-college-of-notre-dame
Student Reports
Come prepared to present today.
We will draw names to have three presentations this week.
Student Reports
Style and Documentation
How to do them, why they're complicated, and why they matter.
The Future is Now:
Mobile technologies, social media, the Cloud, Open Access, Creative Commons, Web 2.0, and where this is (maybe) all going
EXAM, Commonplace Books, and
EXIT REFLECTION

EXAM
The exam will be take-home.
Due
noon, Monday, December 8th
EXIT REFLECTION
500-700 words on:
 Has your assessment of the most important facet of research changed? Why or why not?
 What, for you, is the most exciting or engaging part of literacy research?

Due at noon, Monday December 8th.
Week 7
October 21
Readings:
Archival Research
Guest speaker:
Mark Vajcner
University Archivist
University of Regina Archives and Special Collections
http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/index-e.html
Library and Archives Canada
Look around their website:
Then look around this website:
http://www.canadaspastmatters.ca/
Archives
Digging Deeper
U of R Archives and Special Collections:
http://www.uregina.ca/library/services/archives/index.html
...and read this article:
http://activehistory.ca/2012/05/the-smokescreen-of-modernization-at-library-and-archives-canada/
Advice and tips for archival research:
http://www.stuartschrader.com/advice-graduate-students-embarking-archival-research
http://histsci.wisc.edu/grads/advice/archival_research_trips.shtml
http://www2.archivists.org/usingarchives
Please read before class
Additional resources:
List of common misconceptions:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_misconceptions
SSHRC Workshop - 2.5 hours
1. Pass your proposal to the person on your left.
2. Read the proposal in front of you once over.
3. Re-read the proposal while filling out the response form.
4. Share your responses.
5. Proposal-writer discusses and clarifies.
6. General discussion.
7. Group decides on 1 strength and 1 thing to work on in the proposal.
20 mins
per
proposal
30 mins
http://research.uwaterloo.ca/grants/documents/StudyonSuccessfulSSHRCApplications_000.pdf
Successful strategies:
Writing
Tools
Manuscripts
Incunabula:
The Printing Press
Early Printed Books
Modern Books
The History of Copyright
Once considered a new and scary technology!
Numbers
Cuneiform
Egyptian
Chinese
Stone walls
Animal hides
Birch bark
Surface:
Clay
Wax
Cloth
Metal
Papyrus
Parchment
Paper
Implement:
Stylus (no pigment - stone, clay, wax)
autonomous:
Lead stylus, pencils, crayons, chalk (inherent pigment)
assisted (need pigment added):
dip pens
fountain pens
brushes
Accessories:
erasers
inkwell
sharpener
knife
blotter paper
pounce pots
ruler
light
desk
seat
Formats
Writing tablets
Sticks
Ropes
Sheets (papyrus, parchment/vellum, paper)
Scroll
Codex
pamphlet, journal/magazine
http://www.alibris.com/glossary/glossary-books
CC BY NC ND Diorama Sky
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_writing_ancient_numbers
Written by hand; not printed.
NB: In libraries and archives, the modern meaning often refers to any hand-written document, often specifically pre-publication documents
Capitals
Illumination
Terms:
Quire
Signature
Leaves
Includes:
papyrus, parchment/vellum
scrolls, codices
Early print books that often closely resemble manuscript
Gutenberg press with movable type: 1436
William Caxton's press: first published 1437
Canterbury Tales: 1476
Bookbinding:
sewn together by hand, folded and cut (sometimes by the purchaser)
covers: wood, metal, leather; often added by purchaser
spine: title is a new development
Cultural:
literacy required light and leisure time
book-reading as communal activity
new types of literature feared and reviled
public and private libraries
published books have ISBNs (International Standard Book Number), and legal deposit applies in many countries
standard in current Western publishing: hardcover, trade paperback, mass-market paperback
many cheap paperbacks deteriorate rapidly
oversize, unusual sizes, chapbooks, etc.
Carnegie libraries (including the previous incarnation of the RPL)
First instance of law: Statute of Anne 1710, "An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by vesting the Copies of Printed Books in the Authors or purchasers of such Copies, during the Times therein mentioned"
Common law copyright
copyright term
public domain
(in England and then in Canada)
Access Copyright:
formerly Cancopy
university model license
negotiated by AUCC
http://digitaldonne.tamu.edu/
DigitalDonne:
The History of Copyright
First instance of law: Statute of Anne 1710, "An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by vesting the Copies of Printed Books in the Authors or purchasers of such Copies, during the Times therein mentioned"
Common law copyright
copyright term
public domain
(in England and then in Canada)
Access Copyright:
formerly Cancopy
university model license
negotiated by AUCC
Further reading
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textual_criticism
Wikipedia:
Canadian Copyright and Textual Criticism:
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1961535
also...
Citation/Documentation in context
MLA Style
Tools
MLA = author, page
APA = author, date
Chicago = footnotes
MLA = humanities
APA = social sciences, business
Chicago: humanities, esp. history
double quotation marks for short quotations
block quotations for >4 lines of prose or >3 lines or verse
parenthetical references
last name, page number
rules cover most situations, incl. multiple authors or works, specific texts like the Bible, ellipses, substituting words, indirect citation, etc.
footnotes, endnotes, headers, notes, and appendices may be used
Works Cited on separate page
alphabetical by author's last name OR by the title or corporate author used in the parenthetical reference
hanging indentation
rules to cover most situations
Favours ability to quickly locate the original source. Onus is on writer to integrate information.
Authority:
http://www.lc.unsw.edu.au/plagiarism/citation.html
Clarity
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/media/pdf/20090701095636_747.pdf
MLA LibGuide:
http://uregina.libguides.com/mla
OWL at Purdue:
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/09/
RefWorks:
https://refworks.scholarsportal.info/refworks2/?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWURegina
NB: all developed before the rise of the internet
Calls for Papers
Publication
Conferences
The academic job market and academic job interviews
Non-academic jobs
A day in the life of a university professor
where to find calls for papers
common requirements for application
membership to organizations/associations
travel and accommodations
fees
panels, keynotes, plenaries, and other formats
sponsorship and commercial aspects
volunteering
how to prepare a paper for publication
determining to whom to submit it
the peer review process
formatting, style, documentation
http://chronicle.com/article/The-State-of-the-Academic-Job/141283/
finding job postings
the application package
MLA and the "meat market"
the academic job interview
Tenure-track/tenured:
research
teaching
service
Sessional:
teaching
Associate - Assistant - Full
publishing/editing
communications
libraries
etc.
Tips:
top-up skills online
computer skills
network, network, network
Marking Tips
from someone who hates marking with a passion
1. Read paper through once to get a general impression.
2. Read paper through carefully, making small marks throughout, mostly on grammar and style.
3. Write comments:
My process:
Open with a positive remark, or at least neutral
Critiques of the content go in the middle.
Close with a positive or optimistic remark.
One- or two-sentence remarks on the three most common grammar or style errors
Comments are done in a Word document. Before I start marking, I write in each student's name and the outline of the feedback:
[Name]
Mark:
Feedback: [positive] [negative] [positive]
To work on for next time: [grammar or style errors, with tips on how to correct them, including page numbers of style manuals if available]
In a separate Word document, I start to collect common grammar/style error remarks. I cut and paste these.
As I mark each paper, I place it in "rank" with other marked papers. I don't assign grades until I have marked all the papers, which are by that point arranged from "best" to "weakest."
Rubrics:
- consistency
- clarity to students
- saves time and energy
I will use these in addition to marking in the papers + having a separate comments sheet.

People use rubrics in all kinds of ways. Other iterations I have seen:
leaving the squares blank, filling in a comment as to why they're getting that mark
having the rubric calculate the grade; having it inform the grade; having it have nothing to do with the grade
use it to "calibrate" marking among TAs
Turnitin
- grading options include drag-and-drop comments, long overall comments, and a rubric
- "Similarity Index" shows matches, and is very customizable
Mobile Technologies, Social Media, and Cloud Computing
Open Access and Creative Commons
Web 2.0 and the Future of Literature
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_humanities
1.
2.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_literacy
3.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_literature
Suggested:
1.
http://creativecommons.org/
2.
http://www.carl-abrc.ca/openaccess.html

implications for teaching
implications for file sharing and collaboration
implications for storage and retrieval of scholarly material, archival material, etc.
many grant organizations require Open Access publication
these is some resistance to Open Access in academia
Creative Commons and how it is used in academia
digital literacy
digital literature
experimental formats
the internet, instant publication, and participatory fandom
the persistence of the page
Mobile tech and teaching
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03634520600748573
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8535.2008.00846.x/full
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1227445
Social Media
Cloud Computing
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED535130
Teaching, Learning, and Sharing: How Today's Higher Education Faculty Use Social Media
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1096751611000467
Personal Learning Environments, social media, and self-regulated learning: A natural formula for connecting formal and informal learning
[You can Google "online collaborative research tools" to see the plethora of free and paid tools researchers are using, of which Prezi is one!]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_computing
http://professor-phd.tumblr.com/post/14176610941/dropbox-saves-the-day
Professor PhD: "Dropbox saves The Day"
College Professor: "I Lost Tons of Critical Files Because of Dropbox"
http://www.passfail.com/blogs/business-insider/college-professor-i-lost-tons-of-critical-files-because-of-dropbox/college-professor-i-lost-tons-of-critical-files-because-of-dropbox-11302984.htm
SSHRC Open Access policy:
http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/about-au_sujet/policies-politiques/open_access-libre_acces/index-eng.aspx
Perception of Open Access:
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://utpjournals.metapress.com/content/c97213218720314m/
Author-pays, Open Access, and accessibility:
https://login.libproxy.uregina.ca:8443/login?url=http://jlsc-pub.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1064&context=jlsc
Week 2
September 16
Information Literacy &
Grant Writing
Research Basics Exercise
Readings:
Professional Skills
& The Future of Research
Professional
Skills
Liaison Librarian
for English Literature

Academic Integrity
Please review
http://www.uregina.ca/gradstudies/grad-calendar/policy-univ.html#conduct

to familiarize yourself with the principles of academic integrity, and the procedures and consequences for academic misconduct.
499/830
Class Etiquette
no cell phones (exception: anticipated emergency, phone set on vibrate, leave room to answer)
devices and computers for note taking only
food and drink are allowed provided they are quiet, not messy, and not aromatic
respect and common sense, generally
Useful Links
Harner:
http://libproxy.uregina.ca:2048/login?url=http://www.mlalrg.org/
December 8
UPDATES!!
http://acrl.ala.org/ilstandards/?page_id=133
Updates will be published
in the foreseeable future.
No one is sure what this
will mean.
Commonplace Book Due
includes archives assignment
In the nearby computer lab, spend 15 minutes looking at the web site (including relevant research guides) or another university.

Report back on:
How does it compare to the U of Regina's website and research guide(s)?
Would a new student be able to start basic searching for a first-year English paper?
Would a senior student be able to start basic searching for a longer research paper?

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/education/2014/09/a_changing_view_of_alt_ac_jobs_in_which_ph_d_s_work_outside_of_academia.html
Special Guest Speakers!
Tianna Yaskow, FGSR - 2:30
Sally Gray, ORIP - 4:00
SSHRC Workshop - 1 hour
1. Pass your proposal to the person on your left.
2. Read the proposal in front of you once over.
3. Write down one "quick win" (or more!) and one "dig deeper."
4. Share your responses with the group. Discussion.
15 minutes per paper
10 mins
5 mins
Textual Transmission
Textual Editing
text from Jeanne Shami
Textual Criticism
The History of the Book
The History of the Book
Making a Manuscript: Getty Museum
Week 11
Predatory Publishing
vs.
Publish or Perish
http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2014/11/24/bogus_academic_journal_accepts_paper_that_reads_get_me_off_your_fucking.html
http://www.scs.stanford.edu/~dm/home/papers/remove.pdf
Bibliophile
or
biblioclast?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Ege
Bibliokleptomania
http://blog.bookstellyouwhy.com/bid/230069/Bandits-Crooks-and-Swindlers-Famous-Antiquarian-Book-Thieves
EXAM STUFF:
Preview:
499 example:
830 example:
Names will be given next week
Due Monday December 8th
Unanswered questions and unspoken thoughts
?
?
Avnee
- Since everything original is automatically copyrighted, I was wondering what counts as "original", and how original something needs to be for it to be eligible for copyright. (I'm thinking of artistic works that are based on a previous work, which often happens)
- On book history: What methods libraries and archives use to preserve materials, especially acidic paper that has a tendency to self-destruct, in a manner of speaking. How are materials protected from rot/mould, bookworms, etc.?
- On "publish or perish" in Professional Skills: any tips for how to get academic material accepted by publications or conferences?
Also:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/alexiscoe/book-historians-curators-specialists
Credence
Book as object of veneration
examples outside of the Christian Bible of books being exalted as treasured objects?
Superstition
books as cursed or powerful objects
Taylor
- how can you determine the rarity of a book? Obviously a book is rare
if there are not many of that print and edition but I'm wondering how
you would determine whether a copy you possess (or are looking to
possess) is the rare edition? With the use of the internet, it's easier
to check but how would one go about it before the internet?
- what is the process of creating a physical book? What departments/
how many people are involved in making a book today? How long does it
take? Are there book doctors? What is their process?
- how are moral and ethical concerns of technology solved? We
discussed how the ethics of technology cannot always keep up with
technological evolution but, when they occur, how are they dealt with?
Taken to court? Written into new bylaws? Settled on a case by case
basis?
- On that note, I wouldn't mind discussing how technology is blurring
the line of public and private space. And the effect of social media --
both positive and negative.
- I think it would be interesting to discuss ghost writers.
- I wouldn't mind touching a little bit on international copyright law
if we have time.
Zoé
Citation for very old resources
newspaper article from 1789
author = pseudonym, "M. de la M."
op-ed of unclear publishing origin from 1840
Also, OED word games:
http://public.oed.com/resources/for-students-and-teachers/learning-links/
Michelle
Roopa
William
With the increase in electronic communication, specifically texting, are we on the cusp of a major shift in language usage?

Also: Book curses.
Whether there are databses or online archives that collect translated works
for example, seeing when certain texts in certain languages were translated into other languages
Palm leaf manuscripts
Full transcript