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Short Story Elements

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by

Tina Chaffee

on 18 September 2013

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Transcript of Short Story Elements

The Short Story (and all other stories too)
Plot
Vocabulary

Exposition
Inciting Event
Rising Action
Climax
Falling Action
Conclusion
Includes: Characters
and Setting (Time and Place)
The setting might be told to you: explicit
Or you might have to figure it out: implicit
Inciting Event:
The Inciting Event is what makes the story 'go.'
Without an inciting event, no change would have happened,
and the main character's life would have remained the same.
Rising Action is the phrase we use
to describe the little problems that
make the story more interesting
The Climax is the place in the story
where everything changes for the main
character, and we have a good idea
how the character's problem will be solved
Falling Action happens when the story
winds down. Falling action does not
appear in every story.
The conclusion is
the end of the story
Conflict!
Without a CONFLICT, there is no story.
There are several types of conflict:
Man vs Man
Man vs Nature
Man vs Supernatural
Man vs Society/ Circumstances
Theme
Conflict is the main problem in the story
Theme is a a controlling idea in the story.
Most stories can have more than one theme.
A theme might be a message, or just an idea.
For example:
In Touching Spirit Bear,
one theme is forgiveness.
We can tell because Cole forgives Peter, Cole forgives himself, and Peter finally forgives Cole
A theme can also be a message, like:
Forgiveness is part of healing
Point of View
First Person point of view
refers to any story that is written
by a character in that story.
The NARRATOR uses words like, 'I' and
'us' to refer to himself
Third Person Omniscient point of view refers
to any story that is told by a NARRATOR who
knows what everyone is thinking all of the time, and tells you.
The narrator uses words like 'he,' 'she,' and 'they,' and does not
refer to himself. He is not part of the story
Third Person Limited point of view refers
to any story that is told by a Narrator who knows
what one or two people are thinking all of the time, and
tells you.
The narrator uses words like 'he,' 'she,' and 'they,' and does not
refer to himself. He is not part of the story
The Wind and the Sun were arguing over who was the stronger. Suddenly they saw a traveller coming down the road, and the Sun said: "I see a way to decide our dispute. Whichever of us can cause that traveller to take off his coat shall be regarded as the stronger. You begin."
So the Sun retired behind a cloud, and the Wind began to blow as hard as it could upon the traveller. But the harder he blew the more closely did the traveller wrap his cloak round him, till at last the Wind had to give in despair.
Then, the Sun came out and shone in all his glory upon the traveller, who soon found it too hot to walk with his cloak on.
1. What was the point of view?
2. What idea or lesson controlled the story (theme)?
3. What was the conflict in the story?
4. What kind of conflict was it?
5. Draw and label the plot of the story.
Now, we'll try the same activity with an award-winning short film.
Man vs Self
The Wind and the Sun
(Aesop's Fables)
After watching the video:
1. Take out your notebook and write about
what you have just seen. Remember: this is a reader-response entry. Dont worry about getting it right, just write.
2. Share your response with
your table-mates.
3. Work with your group to answer the previous questions.
1. What was the point of view?
2. What idea or lesson controlled the story (theme)?
3. What was the conflict in the story?
4. What kind of conflict was it?
5. Draw and label the plot of the story.
Man vs Machine
Full transcript