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Irish/Gaelic Language

A Prezi about the language
by

Kristian Hoffmann

on 8 November 2013

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Transcript of Irish/Gaelic Language

Irish/Gaelic Language
How the Irish-Gaelic language came to be supplanted by English
There are parts of Ireland where Irish is still spoken as a traditional, native language. These regions are known as the Gaeltachts
An example of a simple Gaelic conversation
The Gaelic League
Irish is now spoken as a first language by a small minority of Irish people
Douglas Hyde
A major turning point in the Irish language came during the 17th century when the British reinforced their hold on Ireland.
The following century saw the language being weakened further due to the famine and disease which swept the country. This led to the massive emigration.
The Irish language was seen as a “backward” language by the English, so it was not to be used as a means of communicating.
This led to the Gaelic League being created as a means of preserving the Irish language, music, culture and litterateur.
We assume this is him
In 1860 a very important person was born in Ireland.

The Gaelic meaning of “Hello”.

Dia dhuit (God to you)
Dia is Muire dhuit (God and Mary to you)
Literally "Dia" means "God".
and
"Dia dhuit" means "God to you".
His name was
Also known as
This just goes to show how the Irish language uses a number of religious references for everyday sayings.
An Craoibhín Aoibhinn
The following century saw the language being weakened further due to the famine and disease which swept the country. This led to the massive emigration.
Irish has constitutuional status as the national and first offical language in the Rupublic of Ireland
A major turning point in the Irish language came during the 17th century when the British reinforced their hold on Ireland.
The Irish language was seen as a “backward” language by the English, so it was not to be used as a means of communicating.
This led to the creation of the Irish league as a mean to preserve the Irish music, culture and litteratur.
The status of the Irish-Gaelic language and the Gaeltacht today
Douglas Hyde was devoted to the study and publication of Irish litterature and folklore
He published more than hundred pieces of Irish verses
in 1893, Douglas Hyde and Eoin Mac Neill established the Gaelic League
Their aim was to give a sense of old traditional Irishness back to the people
The preservation of Irish culture
The Gaelic League formulated and implemented an ambitious programme.
The Gaelic League formulated and implemented an ambitious programme. In 1905 it had 550 branches throughout the country. The branches organized Irish classes conducted by timiri (travelling teachers) and also lectures, concerts and Irish dances.
Number of Irish speakers in Ireland.
The number of native Irish-speakers in the Republic of Ireland today is a smaller fraction of the population than it was at independence.
The main reason for the decline was, according to some, the pressure the state put upon Irish-speakers to use English.
Many Irish speaking families encouraged their children to speak English as it was the language of education and employment.
On 19 December 2006 the government announced a 20-year strategy to help Ireland become a fully bilingual country. This involved a 13 point plan and encouraging the use of language in all aspects of life.
Gaeltachts in Ireland:
Donegal, population: 22,877 (25% of all in 2006)
Meath, population: 1,603 ( 2% of all in 2006)
Mayo, population: 10,523 (11% of all in 2006)
Galway, population: 43,184 (47% of all in 2006)
Kerry, population: 8,446 ( 9% of all in 2006)
Cork, population: 3,660 ( 4% of all in 2006)
Waterford, population: 1,569 ( 2% of all in 2006)
This means that out of 6.4 million people in Ireland, only 1.4% speak Irish as a predominant language.
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