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Engage NY 101

A Framingham Math Coach presents how Engage NY works and how it connects to their former math curriculum.
by

Hilary Kreisberg

on 13 November 2014

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Transcript of Engage NY 101

Engage NY 101
How Many of You Feel Like This?
Today's Objectives
Teachers will…
Understand the structure of Engage NY lessons
Decompose future Engage NY lessons to identify mathematical conceptual models
Develop stronger mathematical content knowledge through exploration, guided discovery, and direct instruction
Feel more comfortable with the implementation of Engage NY and newer math concepts

Overview
Presented and Created by:
Hilary Kreisberg, Math Coach

It's Time To Stop Feeling...
OVERWHELMED
ANNOYED
TIRED
FRUSTRATED
&
... MATH INCOMPETENT
Let's Redefine Math Together
Structure
Think Math!
Engage NY
Chapters give overviews of the
lessons and the objectives
Chapters address how to meet
the needs of all learners
Chapters offer vocabulary activities in the student handbook
Modules give overviews of the lessons and the objectives

Modules offer differentiation
strategies in the margins of
the lesson
Modules introduce new terms
in the overview section

Format of Lessons
Think Math!
Engage NY
Student Objective(s) listed
Student Objective(s) listed
Skills Practice and Review (SPRs)
Fluency Practice or Sprints
Headline News
Application Problem
Teach and Practice
(Lab books and Lab pages)
Concept Development and Problem Set
Student Objectives
Can be found right at the beginning of the Lesson.
These objectives are based off of the Common Core State Standard (CCSS).
Use these objectives when formulating your student-friendly objectives.
i.e.: Students will be able to partition a whole into equal parts and identify unit fractions.

Fluency Practice or Sprints
These are suggested methods to practice and reinforce fluency of math facts and to develop numeracy (number sense).
These can be done outside of the math instructional block.

Application Problems
Application problems are used to activate prior knowledge of the
concept being taught in the lesson - similar to Headline story.
RDW and problem solving strategies should be modeled during this time (Read, Draw, Write) = (Understand, Plan, Solve)






*You may find that you will have to modify these based upon your students’ needs and that is okay!
Concept Development

Heart of Your Instruction:

Use of mathematical models to aid students in
building their conceptualization of the math
content.

Modeling, direct instruction, inquiry-based learning time to build understanding of main concept.

Students practice (Problem Sets) using these models to solve problems with the math content taught in the lesson.

Student Debrief
The last 5 - 10 minutes of a lesson should be for:
demonstrating understanding of the math objective
having academic conversations
reflecting on learning
assessing students quickly and informally

**Allowing students time to elaborate and clarify, support
ideas with evidence, build and/or challenge ideas, paraphrase, and
synthesize will help develop their mathematical thinking skills.




Mathematical Practice Standards
Understand, Plan, Solve, Check
Read, Draw, Write
REMEMBER:
You are a Highly-Qualified Teacher
You are dedicated
You are passionate
You are a FANTASTIC teacher
You KNOW how to teach

We need to embrace this
organizational shift with
confidence... and here's how.

Look for during
small group work
Listen for this during academic conversations
Look for during
LAB pages or
Problem Sets
(Application of
Concept Development)
Number Bonds in Action - Grade 2
Understanding the Math Content
How Ideas Build Through Engage NY
Grade 2
Grade 3
Grade 5
Grade 4
Grade 1
Kindergarten
Second Graders must
The student is faced with finding the sum of 37 and 25, which would normally be thought of as a "regrouping" problem.

This student is still looking to make 10s, so s/he knows s/he needs 3 more to make 37 into 40.

Notice that s/he is really still splitting 5, even though now it's actually 25. After splitting, s/he's got an easier problem that can be solved mentally (40 + 22).
Third Graders must
Doesn't this actually mirror what
we do when we calculate elapsed
time mentally?
Fourth graders must
Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with the same denominator
in more than one way
(4.NF.3b)
Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators
(4.NF.3c)
Add and convert measurement units
(4.MD.2)
Fifth graders must
Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by
replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an
equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators
(5.NF.1)
Use benchmark fractions and number sense of fractions to estimate mentally and
assess the reasonableness of answers
(5.NF.2)
Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths,
using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on
place value, properties of operations, and/or the
relationship between addition and subtraction
(5.NBT.7)
Kindergartners must

Fluently add and subtract within 5
(k.OA.5)
Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way
(k.OA.3)
Find the number that makes 10 when added to a digit
(k.OA.4)
First Graders must
This example shows one way a 1st Grade child might determine the sum of 8 and 5 using the skills s/he
learned in Kindergarten.

The student knows s/he wants to make 10 (K.OA.4)
and s/he knows s/he can decompose 5 into
2 and 3 (K.OA.5). So now the child is thinking of
10 + 3, or 13.
Example: Number Bonds
Number bonds help students see that numbers can be "broken" into pieces to make computation easier. With number bonds, students recognize the relationships between numbers through a written model that shows how the numbers are related.

number bond
ten frame
Add and subtract within 20
(1.OA.6)
Use strategies such as counting on; making ten; decomposing a number leading to a ten; using the relationship between addition and subtraction; and creating equivalent but easier or known sums
(1.OA.6)
Add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction
(2.NBT.5)
Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and
algorithms based on place value, properties of operations,
and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction
(3.NBT.2)
Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes.
(3.MD.1)
We split the 4/5 into 2/5 and 2/5 (4.NF.3b) to create a whole out of the 3/5, resulting in 1 2/5 (4.NF.3c). Seems a bit easier than finding an improper fraction and then introducing a totally different procedure for converting it to a mixed number.

Number Bonds = Life Savers!
Understanding the Math Content
Using the remainder of the PD Workshop time,
meet with your grade level team
to break apart a future module (unit) for Engage NY to identify new and old math concepts that will be covered.

How to Access Engage NY Modules:
1. Go to itslearning.com
2. Click "communities".
3. Click "K-5 Curriculum Library.
4. Click on your respective grade-level.
5. Use the pacing guide to identify the next Engage NY unit to be taught and click on the unit.
6. Download Module from link.
7. Explore!
Debrief
*We will meet back together 10 minutes before the end of the session to debrief. Be ready to share
one
thing you feel more confident about!*
Example of Easy Embedded Fluency Outside of Math Instruction:
Before your class heads to specials or recess, hand out cards with a math problem on it (i.e. 4 + 6 or 5 x 9). Kids have to line up in ascending or descending order!

As a preface, this is a 2nd grade student trying to apply a lesson on decomposing numbers to make addition sentences easier to solve by making 10's.
Look for beginning conceptual knowledge and try to identify how she will expand her thinking as she continues to apply the number bond strategy.
Looking back at the objectives, do you:
Understand the structure of Engage NY lessons?
Feel more knowledgeable about newer mathematical conceptual models?
Have a stronger mathematical content knowledge?
Feel more comfortable with the implementation of Engage NY and newer math concepts?

Student Objective(s)
Fluency Practice or Sprints
Application Problem
Concept Development and Problem Set
Read, Draw, Write
Student Objective(s)
Fluency Practice
Application Problem
Concept Development and Problem Set
Read, Draw, Write
Student Objective(s)
Fluency Practice or Sprints
Application Problem
Concept Development and Problem Set
Read, Draw, Write
Student Objective(s)
Fluency Practice or Sprints
Application Problem
Concept Development and Problem Set
Read, Draw, Write
Student Objective(s)
Fluency Practice or Sprints
Application Problem
Concept Development and Problem Set
Read, Draw, Write
Full transcript