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Healthy Meal Planning

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by

Sara Elnakib

on 18 June 2018

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Transcript of Healthy Meal Planning

Healthy Meal Planning
Menu planning can create a stress free cooking experience for you and a much more nutritious and delicious dining experience for your family.
In this presentation we will discuss
1) The benefits of menu planning

2) Some simple tips to start menu planning

3) Some nutritional gaps we need to be concerned when planning your meals
By Sara Elnakib, RD MPH
Menu planning is a proactive way to preparing meals for your family.
Eat out less or eat less
frozen meals
Save money by reducing grocery waste and eating at home more
Save time and energy by having everything you need before you start cooking and all you have to do is follow the recipes
It will also help you experiment with healthier recipes and notice nutritional gaps in your families diet.
Noticing the Gaps
Think about the vegetables you like to eat.
Think about the vegetables your spouse like to eat.
These are the vegetables your kids are probably eating
By having the whole family involved in the menu planning process you can empower your family to make more health conscious decisions.
By posting your weekly menu on the fridge you can avoid the age old question of “What’s for dinner?”
Tips on Planning meals

Start by planning a week at a time, don’t overwhelm yourself by trying to create a whole month’s menu.
Start with the largest meal you usually eat together as a family, which in most cases is dinner.
Create Meals around the season
Not only is buying seasonal fruits and vegetables cheaper and more flavorful it is much more nutritious.
Variety is the spice of life.

Cooking foods that you can only make in season makes them that much more special because you have to wait for them all year. Which will create anticipation and excitement for your family.
Remember to be flexible

menu planning is meant to be a tool you use to make life easier.
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Protein
Protein
Protein
Protein
Protein
Protein
Protein
Cuisine
Cuisine
Cuisine
Cuisine
Cuisine
Cuisine
Cuisine
Vegetable
Vegetable
Vegetable
Vegetable
Vegetable
Vegetable
Vegetable
Starch
Starch
Starch
Starch
Starch
Starch
Starch
Meatless Monday
Fish
Chicken
Fish
Beef
Veal
Shrimp
Mexican
Italian
Indian
Caribbean
American
Middle Eastern
Chinese
Cabbage, Avocado
Spinach, Broccoli
Cauliflower, Sweet Potato
Avocado, Asparagus
Zucchini, Squash
Okra, Tomatoes
Peppers, Broccoli
whole grain tortillas
Whole Grain Pizza Dough
Brown Rice
Wild Rice with Quinoa
Mashed Sweet Potatoes
Rice Pilaf
Whole grain pasta
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Saturday
Friday
Pan Seared
Cod Tacos with
Guacamole
Pico de gallo
Garden Vegetable Pizza
with Pesto and Parmesan
Chicken Biryani
with roasted cauliflower
Blackened Salmon with Mango Salsa
Herb crusted Steak with mashed sweet potatoes
Middle Eastern Okra with Rice Pilaf
Shrimp Stir Fry with vegetable lo mien
The 4 nutrients missing in the average American diet.
Potassium
Dietary Fiber
Calcium
Vitamin D
Potassium helps us maintain healthy blood pressure, reduce our risk of kidney stones and decreases bone loss.
We need about 4,700 mg of potassium a day
Some good sources of potassium are potatoes, spinach, broccoli, orange juice, bananas, milk and plain yogurt and even beans like soybeans or kidney beans.
Dietary fiber helps reduce our risk of obesity, and diabetes
Soluble fiber helps reduces cholesterol which helps reduce heart disease.
We need 25g of fiber for women and 38g of fiber for men.
Some good sources of fiber are beans, whole grains, nut, fruits and vegetables.
Calcium is not only important for bone health but it also helps our nerves, blood vessels and muscles.

Calcium needs vary with age but generally we need around 1,000 mg of calcium a day.

The best sources of calcium are in milk, yogurt and cheese.

You can also get calcium from leafy greens like spinach, collard greens
and broccoli
Vitamin D is important to bone
health because it aids in the absorption
of calcium and it reduces the risk of bone fractures.

We need about 600 IU of Vitamin D daily.

We can get Vitamin D from the sun, however due to the inconsistencies associated
with that method. Eating fish high in
vitamin D would be a good idea.
Some fish are salmon, herring,
mackerel and tuna.
You can also get it from
egg yolks and fortified foods.
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