Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Daintree Rainforest

No description
by

sarah haynes

on 1 October 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Daintree Rainforest

D
a
i
n
t
r
e
e
R
a
i
n
f
o
r
e
s
t
By Sarah Haynes
Tropical Rainforest Definition:
A tropical rainforest is a biome that is located within the latitude of 28 degrees north and south of the equator. A tropical rainforest experiences humidity and a lot of rainfall.
Yearly Rainfall
A tropical rainforest can be classified as a rainforest by having at least 1.3 meters of rain per year. The Daintree Tropical Rainforest produces approximately 2 meters of rainfall yearly. Approximately every year the Daintree Rainforest receives 120 days of rain.
Temperature and Climate
The average temperature is 28 degrees celsius. The maximum temperature in the summer is 32 degrees and the maximum temperature in the winter is 25 degrees. The climate is tropical all year.
Weather
Tropical rainforests are located near the equator where there is a large amount of water. Because of this the water gets evaporated into the clouds and when the clouds can't store any more it rains . It is very sunny in the Daintree Rainforest but on the forest floor and the understorey it is very dark and only 2% of light reaches the bottom!
3 Fauna and Adaptations
R
a
i
n
b
o
w

L
o
r
i
k
e
e
t
Adaptations:
Rainbow Lorikeets stay in groups for protection.

If they notice a predator they will set out a high pitched squawk to warn the others to fly away.

Rainbow Lorikeets have short, strong legs, flexible hips and two pairs of toes with claws for hanging upside down and sideways to get away from predators.

They can fly up to 100km without stopping to collect a variety of food from different regions!
Fun Facts:
Rainbow Lorikeets love to eat fruit, seeds, insects, flowers, nectar and pollen.

Rainbow Lorikeets can live up to 25-28 years.

The adult Rainbow Lorikeets length is up to 30cm long.

The adult Rainbow Lorikeets weigh up to 140 grams.

Their scientific name is Trichoglossus Haematodus Molluccanus.
Cassowary
Adaptations:
Cassowaries can eat fruit and fungi which is poisonous to humans.

They have a really good memory and are able to navigate the way back to their territory and know where their usual fruiting trees are.

They have a special call to alert other cassowaries if they are in danger.

Cassowaries have sharp and powerful claws to defend themselves.

They have tough skin and bristle-like feathers to defend themselves from other Cassowaries from hurting them.
Fun Facts:
They can grow between 150cm to 200cm long.

Cassowaries can be located in northern Queensland, New Guinea and eastern Indonesia.

Cassowaries eat fruit and anything from snails to small dead mammals.

They have black fur which looks a bit like human hair.

Cassowary baby chicks are yellow and black striped.
Bandicoot
Adaptations:
Bandicoots have a pointed snout to help them find food.

They have sharp front claws so they can dig for their food.

The second and third toe are connected so they can get rid of parasites and groom their fur.

The females have a backward facing pouch so that her pouch doesn't fill with soil while she is digging.
Fun Facts:
Bandicoots eat spiders, berries, seeds, insects and other small creatures.

They are about the same size as a rabbit.

They grow from 31cm-43cm.

They live in forests and woodlands.

Bandicoots have pointed ears, a short tail, grey-brown fur and a long pointed nose/snout.
3 Flora and Adaptations
Idiot Fruit
Adaptations:
The Idiot Fruit has got poison in the seed to stop animals eating it.
Fun Facts:
The Idiot Fruit is from the Calycanthaceae family.

The Idiot Fruits scientific name is Idiospermum Australiense.

It can also be called the Ribbonwood.

The fruit inside the plant is approximately 80 millimeters long.
Wild Ginger
Adaptations:
Each individual flower sits horizontally on the surface of the soil to make it easy for insects to pollinate.

The leaves grow very large to reach the sunlight.
Fun Facts:
Its scientific name is Asarum Canadense.

Wild Ginger can grow up to 19 feet high.

If you cut the stem water comes out of it.

Some wild ginger can be toxic.
Lawyer Vine
Adaptations:
The Lawyer Vine has thorns to protect itself.
Fun Facts:
Its scientific name is Smilax Australis.

It can also be called Wait-a-While Vine.

The Lawyer Vines' stem can grow up to 8 meters long.
Bibliography
daintreecoast.blogspot.sg/2011/01/colour-and-movement.html-Daintree News: Colour and Movement

bioweb-uwla/bio203/s2008/runde_sama/Adaptation.html-Rainbow Lorikeet- by Samantha Runde

www.northernparrots.com/rainbow-lorikeet-fact-sheet-blog97/-Rainbow Lorikeet Fact Sheet

www.natureaustralia.org.au/news/8-interesting-facts-about-8-australain-birds.xml-8 Interesting Facts about 8 Australian Birds

australianmuseum.net.au/Southern-Cassowary-Southern-Cassowary-Australian Museum

www.kidcyber.com.au/topics/bandicoot.htm-Bandicoots

http://australianmuseum.net.au/Long-nosed-Bandicoot

www.wettropics.gov.au/the-green-dinosaur-The green dinosaur-Wet Tropics World Heritage Area

http://www.daintreerainforest.com/daintree/locationGuideView.html?guideId=225

http://www.skyrail.com.au/rainforests

http://www.daintreerainforestinformation.com/Daintree_Plants.html

http://www.daintree.com/daintree-weather.html
The End
Daintree Yearly Rainfall and Temperature
Full transcript