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Digital Storytelling

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by

Priscilla Peters

on 12 May 2015

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Transcript of Digital Storytelling

Digital Storytelling
by Jessica Grimm, Priscilla Peters, & Samara Aguilar

Sarah Jones, Child #1
16 year old, Caucasian female
Lives in Atherton, California with her parents
Attends a private high school
Parents went to college
High income family;
father-$68k & mother-$62k per year

Sarah's Risk Factors
-
Unique Risk Factor: Delinquent Peers
Peer influence and pressures
Lack of parental involvement
relationships
monitoring
Substance use
Copying behavior of delinquent friends
(Tiet, Huizinga, & Byrnes, 2010)
Digital Storytelling
by Jessica Grimm, Priscilla Peters, & Samara Aguilar
Child #1: Sarah Jones, United States
Child #2: Hathai Leelapun, Thailand
Child #3: LeRoy Marcon, Haiti
Common Risk Factors:
Residential Mobility
Trauma
Special Needs
Common Protective Factors:
Family Support
Ethnic Identity
Positive Community Support
Hathai Leelapun, Child #2
12 years old, female
Attends a public middle school, 7th grade
Lives in Bangkok, Thailand with her parents and her older sister.
Both her mom and dad work from place to place, and her older sister works at the flea market
Her parents did not attend college
The family income is about 5k a year
Thailand Country Data
Language:
Thai
Gross National Income:
$5,340 a year per capita
Avg. Lifespan:
74 years old
Infant Mortality Rate:
9.86 deaths every 1,000 live births
Mortality Rate Under 5 years old:
13.1 per 1,000 children
School Attendance Rate:

Preschool: 100%
Elementary: 92.8%
High School: 82%
College: 51.2%
(CIA World Fact Book, 2015; The World Bank, 2015)
Hathai's Risk Factors
1.
Transgender
Loneliness
Depression
Suicidal Ideation
Low level of education
High risk for negative health outcomes
Lack of education about HIV and other STDs
(Yadegarfard, Ho, & Bahramabadian, 2013)
2.
Residential Mobility
: Due to working from place to place, her father is constantly changing jobs which causes the family to move.
3.
Trauma:
Hathi's father is abusive towards her because she is transgender.
4.
Special Needs:
Hathai struggles in school due to intellectual disability and showed lower scores on internal assets.
(Gilmore, 2013)
1.
Family Cohesion

Mom and sister stick up for her when facing Hathai's father
Family togetherness
Outcomes
Associated with sexual decisions
delaying age in first sex experience
Higher self-efficacy
High self-esteem
(Stotzer, 2011)
2.
Ethnic Identity:
Having a strong sense of ethnic identity has helped her develop high self-esteem.
(Costigan et al., 2010)
3.
Community Support:
Hathai received support from school and friends
4.
Family Support:
Hathai receives family support not only from her mother and sister, but through her extended family.

LeRoy Marcon, Child #3
7 year old boy
From Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Lives with his parents (early 40s) and his two younger brothers (3 and 5 years old)
Both parents only attended primary school
Family annual income is $815
Country Data
Language: Creole
Gross National Income: $1,720
Average Lifespan: 63 years of age
Infant Mortality Rates: 57 deaths per 1,000 births
Mortality Rates for Children Under 5: 76 deaths per 1,000 births
School attendance:
Preschool: N/A
Elementary: 76.7% males and 77.7% females
High School: 21.6% males and 29.1% females
College: N/A
*(The World Bank ,2015; UNICEF, 2013)
Brand, J. E., & Xie, Y. (2010). Who benefits most from college? Evidence
for negative selection in heterogeneous economic returns to higher education. American
Sociological Review, 75(2), 273-302.
Burrow, A. & Hill, P. (2011). Purpose as a form of identity capital for positive youth adjustment.
Developmental Psychology, 47(4), 1196-1206.
Central Intelligence Agency. (2015). The world factbook: East and Southeast Asia; Thailand.
Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/th.html
Central Intelligence Agency. (2015). The world factbook; North America; United States.
Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html
Costigan, C. L., Koryzma, C. M., Hua, J. M., & Chance, L. J. (2010). Ethnic identity,
achievement, and psychological adjustment: Examining risk and resilience among youth
from immigrant Chinese families in Canada. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 16(2), 264-273.
Gilmore, L., Campbell, M., & Shochett, I. (2013). Resilience profiles of children with
intellectual disability and their typically developing peers. Psychology in the Schools,
50(10), 1032-1041.


Brand, J. E., & Xie, Y. (2010). Who benefits most from college? Evidence
for negative selection in heterogeneous economic returns to higher education. American
Sociological Review, 75(2), 273-302.
Burrow, A. & Hill, P. (2011). Purpose as a form of identity capital for positive youth adjustment.
Developmental Psychology, 47(4), 1196-1206.
Central Intelligence Agency. (2015). The world factbook: East and Southeast Asia; Thailand.
Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/th.html
Central Intelligence Agency. (2015). The world factbook; North America; United States.
Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html
Costigan, C. L., Koryzma, C. M., Hua, J. M., & Chance, L. J. (2010). Ethnic identity,
achievement, and psychological adjustment: Examining risk and resilience among youth
from immigrant Chinese families in Canada. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 16(2), 264-273.
Gilmore, L., Campbell, M., & Shochett, I. (2013). Resilience profiles of children with
intellectual disability and their typically developing peers. Psychology in the Schools,
50(10), 1032-1041.


References Cont.

Conclusion: Risk Factor
Global Risks:

Residential Mobility
Sarah:
parents getting promotions/new jobs
Hathai:
parents constantly changing jobs
LeRoy:
parents needing to find new jobs
Trauma
Sarah:
Domestic abuse
Hathai:
Domestic abuse
LeRoy:
Domestic abuse
Special Needs
Sarah:
struggles with being born with special needs
Hathai:
no help at home and struggling at school.
LeRoy:
not having the resources to get help
Individual Risk:
Delinquent Peers
Transgender
Natural Disasters

"A person's identity comes from where that person's immediate settings rely as well as where that person lives and develops as a human being."
-Brofenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory
United States Info
Conclusion: Protective Factor
LeRoy's Risk Factor
Universal Protective Factors:
Family support
Positive community support
Unique Protective Factor:
Having a strong sense of ethnic identity.

(Burrows & Hill, 2013)
Using the Arts:
Sarah:
Her parents were able to enroll her in extracurricular activities of her choice, helps to give her something positive to do if her parents are home.
Hathai:
Being able to write in a journal helps her express her interests, desires, and aspirations.
Leroy:
Being able to draw to express himself freely.



Natural Disasters
Diseases
Lack of resources to get medical attention
Depression
Anxiety
(Dass-Brailsford, P., et. all, 2015)

Residential Mobility: Parent needing to find a new job
Trauma: Domestic violence from the father as his way to cope with their current economic status.
Special Needs: Not having the resources to help children with special needs
Language:
English
Gross National Income:
$60,000 (per person)
Avg. Lifespan:
79.56 years
Infant Mortality Rate:
6.17 deaths for every 1,000 births
Mortality Rate Under 5 years old:
6.9 deaths for every 1,000 births
School Attendance Rate:
Preschool: 54.9%
Elementary: 97.4%
High School: 89.2%
College: 50.4%

(CIA World Fact Book, 2015; United States Census Bureau, 2014; The World Bank, 2015)
Mental Strength
Build resilience to deal with stressful situations
Can overcome negative aspects
(Griffin et al. ,2009)

Family Support: help build child's strength to overcome adversities
Ethnic Identity: Having self-worth builds confidence
Positive Community Support: Helps rebuild communities and support families in need.

LeRoy's Protective Factor
-
Residential Mobility:
Parents can get new jobs/get promotions which can lead to moving houses
-
Trauma:
Domestic abuse can be present in any family; wealthy families can afford substances that can contribute to abuse.
-
Special Needs:
Being born with a special need can be difficult, even with assistance there is still many struggles.
Sarah's Protective Factors
-
Unique Protective Factor: Attending College
College is expected
More benefits from going to college
Higher earnings/economic benefits
Successful career
(Brand & Xie, 2010)
-
Family Support:
Family support would help build parent-child relationships, with better involvement and monitoring.
-
Ethnic Identity:
Having a sense of self and knowing who you are builds self confidence.
-
Positive Community Support:
Community support helps adolescents with delinquent behaviors, it provides support and activities.
Hathai's Protective Factors
References
Brand, J. E., & Xie, Y. (2010). Who benefits most from college? Evidence
for negative selection in heterogeneous economic returns to higher education.
American
Sociological Review, 75
(2), 273-302.
Burrow, A. & Hill, P. (2011). Purpose as a form of identity capital for positive youth adjustment.
Developmental Psychology, 47
(4), 1196-1206.
Central Intelligence Agency. (2015). The world factbook: East and Southeast Asia; Thailand.
Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/th.html
Central Intelligence Agency. (2015). The world factbook; North America; United States.
Retrieved from https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/us.html
Costigan, C. L., Koryzma, C. M., Hua, J. M., & Chance, L. J. (2010). Ethnic identity,
achievement, and psychological adjustment: Examining risk and resilience among youth
from immigrant Chinese families in Canada.
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 16
(2), 264-273.
Gilmore, L., Campbell, M., & Shochett, I. (2013). Resilience profiles of children with
intellectual disability and their typically developing peers. Psychology in the Schools,
50(10), 1032-1041.
Māhūwahine. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 7
(5), 424-435.
Tiet, Q., Huizinga, D., & Byrnes, H. (2010). Predictors of resilience among inner city youths.
Journal
of Child & Family Studies, 19
(3), 360-378. doi:10.1007/s10826-009-9307-5
UNICEF. (2013). At a glance: Haiti. Retrieved from
http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/haiti_statistics.html
United States Census Bureau. (April 3, 2015). Income main. Retrieved from
http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/income/
United States Census Bureau. (September 24, 2014). School enrollment. Retrieved from
http://www.census.gov/hhes/school/
Stotzer, R. L. (2011), Family cohesion among hawai'i's mahuwahine. Journal of GLBT Studies, 7(5), 424-435.
The World Bank. (2015). Mortality rate. Retrieved from
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.DYN.MORT/countries/US--XS?display=graph
The World Bank. (2015). World Development Indicators. Retrieved from
http://databank.worldbank.org/data/views/reports/tableview.aspx
Yadegarfard, M., Ho, R., & Bahramabadian, F. (2013). Influences on loneliness, depression,
sexual-risk behaviour and suicidal ideation among Thai transgender youth.
Culture,
Health & Sexuality, 15
(6), 726-737.
Conclusion: Community Resources
Finding resources and support in communities
Community centers; classes, services, activities
Recreational areas
Relationships with neighbors, teachers
Full transcript