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Low Hanging Fruit for Active Learning

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by

Shanna Shaked

on 2 August 2016

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Transcript of Low Hanging Fruit for Active Learning

Educational Psychology
How can we help every student learn
most
with the
least
amount of effort?
#2. EPR Increases Engagement
75-100%
of middle school students
correctly predicted
results BEFORE trying experiment [Reflection]
Shanna Shaked, Ph.D., M.A.T.
UCLA Physics Lecturer
www.shannashaked.com
shaked@physics.ucla.edu
SCAAPT, April 25, 2015
Theoretical support
Constructivists
: students construct own knowledge
Vygotsky
: students learn how to think and talk science
Low-hanging Fruit for Active Learning
Why isn't EPR used more often?
Independent work time allows students to ask questions of peers and teacher [Reflection]
What about those that do not ask?
Worksheets involve individual responses
Found these insufficient in lens activity [Refl.]
Whole-class questions and guided notes sufficient
Many don't fill these in or don't know when incorrect [Reflection]
Thanks to the People who Helped "Shed Light" on This Work
Ithaca College Master's in Teaching Program
UCLA Physical Sciences Division
UCLA Office Of Instructional Development Institutional Improvement Grant
Empirical support
Students
feel positively
, and increase
attention
,
engagement
, and
interaction
(Kay & LeSage, 2009 meta-analysis)
Caution
: engagement does not imply learning!
51%
of students felt regular check-in
helped them stay engaged
[Survey]
More
misconceptions come out
when engaged [Reflection]
Small
Large (>30 students)
High
Med.
Low
Effort

PhET
Peer
Instruction
(flash cards)

Interactive Demos
Context-Rich
Peer Instr. w/ Clickers
RWA
Just-in-Time Teaching
Psychology
Research
https://www.physport.org/
Physics Education Research
Meta-analyses found that interactive engagement increases learning
Hake, 1998,
Am. J. Phys;
Freeman et al., 2013,
PNAS.
Decreases failure and increases under-represented minority retention
Freeman et al., 2013,
PNAS.
Haak et al., 2011
, Science.
Watkins & Mazur, 2013,
Journal of College Science Teaching
.
Question resulting from research:
How
should it be
implemented
? (Turpen & Finkelstein, 2009)
In-class exercises
Piazza
Talk with your neighbor about how you might fill in this table for your classroom.
Will the spinning block go:
A Higher
B Not as high
C Same height
D Unsure
A
B
C
D
Interactive Lecture Demos
(Sokoloff & Thornton) present a series of questions to guide students toward prediction. You can adapt this technique to your classroom.

What is conserved in the collision?
A Energy
B Momentum
C Both
D Neither
What questions do you have?

What other evidence-based active learning tools would help most teachers?
Psychology suggests we learn better through interaction, but
is that supported by evidence?

UCLA Physics Education Research Journal Club, including Josh Samani and Laura Vican
Christopher Martin
Professor Michael Bodhi Rogers
Professor Jasper Kok
Full transcript