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Women in the Elizabethan Era

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Nick Montello

on 20 November 2012

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Transcript of Women in the Elizabethan Era

Women in the Elizabethan Era Witches The hatred of witches The hatred of witches began with
the writing of Malleus Maleficarum.
This gave a rise in the hatred of witches, sometimes causing entire villages to be void of women.
Witches were usually old women or widows and if a husband died unexpectedly, it was thought that the wife poisoned him. In some cases of persecution, the women would confess when being tortured. Other times, Henry IV actually stepped in and stopped them, saying that it was basically a waste of time. The hatred of witches began with the writing of "Malleus Maleficarum". This gave a rise in the hatred of witches, sometimes causing entire villages to be void of women. Witches were usually old women or widows and if a husband died unexpectedly, it was thought that the wife poisoned him. In some cases of persecution, the women would confess when being tortured. However, these women were more often than not simply in need of help. Other times, Henry IV actually stepped in and stopped them, saying that it was basically a waste of time. Women disguised as men Some women ran away and disguise themselves as men. In this time period, women did not generally wear men's clothes so if there was a women wearing pants or carrying a musket, she was automatically assumed to be a man. Some cases involved them going to fairly far lengths to remain hidden. One story tells about a woman who married another woman and worked as a smith. Not all were lucky; the woman in this story was burnt when she was discovered. In Shakespeare's play "The Two Gentleman of Verona", one of the females dresses as a man in order to follow her love interest. Women in the army Women did not actually fight; rather,
they worked as nurses. They also were there
to do anything that they would usually do
at home (make dinner, put up tents, etc.). Sometimes, they even did this while carrying gear and children. They were often not liked and some wished to be rid of them. However, this wouldn't work as men probably would not be able to do any of the things that women could by themselves. I figured this would only prove that men need women and vice-versa but it did not for some reason. Marriage Marriages were not always happy. Husbands could
legally beat their wives or sometimes even kill them. The women often got back at men by spreading rumors or gossiping. Men were usually in charge of a household and were seen as superior. The women's purpose was basically to clean, cook and have children. Other than that, they were not seen as necessary. Work available Women, especially those in a lower class, almost always worked. This was common among those who needed money. Such families would sometimes send their daughters off to work for the day. However, women were not payed as much as men (which was odd because a woman held the throne). Because of this and the fact that they were not as likely to go off and drink using their money, they were sometimes hired for domestic jobs and farm work. Another possible job was spinning yarn. "Elizabethan Occupations and Jobs." Elizabethan Occupations and Jobs. Web. 20 Nov. 2012.
"Women." History of Women. Web. 20 Nov. 2012.
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