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Sonnet 73 - William Shakespeare

A TPCASTT on Sonnet 73, describing what Shakespeare intended to say
by

nahsi lawarga

on 12 December 2012

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Transcript of Sonnet 73 - William Shakespeare

Sonnet 73 Presentation by Ishan Agrawal, Dustin Feldsine, and Wills Liou The Title Paraphrase Connotation Shift Attitude Title Theme That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire
Consumed with that which it was nourish’d by.
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long. The season that you can see in me
When a few, or no yellow leaves do hang
Upon the branches that shake against the cold
There are the ruins of a church choirs, where the birds once sang
But in me, you can only see the dim light that remains
After the sun sets in the west
The light is soon extunguished by black night
The image of death hides everything there
You see a dying fire in me
A dying fire where my burnt out youth lies upon
Like a death-bed where it must die
Extinguished by what had once fueled it
You sense this and it only makes your love stronger
Warmly loving what will leave you soon The Title of this poem is Sonnet 73. It is one of the 154 Sonnets William Shakespeare wrote. The most useful information that this title can tell us is that the structure of this poem will follow that of a sonnet. More will be explained later. Written by William Shakespeare
* 14 lines

* Follows Iambic Pentameter

* static rhyme scheme Spenserian sonnet a
b
a
b
c
d
c
d
e
f
e
f
g
g Structure of a Sonnet That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire
Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by.
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long. Sonnet 73 The theme presented in Shakespeare's Sonnet 73, is that love grows stronger with age. Shakespeare uses Metaphor Metaphor - Shakespeare has written this in a shifting tone.
But his overall tone is caring and passionate. This is comparing the poet’s life to the seasons of the year by saying that his body looks like the dying trees in Winter of Autumn The significance of the title, "Sonnet 73" has not changed after reading the poem because it has no significant relation to the poem itself. Line 1 - That time of year thou mayst in me behold
Line 2 - When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Shakespeare uses Imagery Line 6 - As after sunset fadeth in the west;
Line 7 - Which by and by black night doth take away, Imagery - These lines portray the image of the sun fading as black night engulfs the land, like when life fades the body is engulfed in cold, black death That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire
Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by.
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long. First Shift The first shift in Shakespeare’s "Sonnet 73" is when he transitions from himself dying to focusing on his lover and how she will have to leave her. Shakespeare transitions when he starts his first line about his wife “In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire.” He says old age may have damaged his body, but his lover's love for him will only strengthen because of his age. His words are best represented by Shakespeare’s last two lines. “This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong/ To love that well which thou must leave ere long.” Second Shift He then transitions and start talking about his lover's love for him and how it will get stronger because he is closer to dying. The transition happens when he says the line “This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long.” The poet shifts into a hopeful feeling, saying that even though he is about to die, he has a reason to live until the end as the poet and his lover grow more deeply in love with each other. That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou seest the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie,
As the death-bed whereon it must expire
Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by.
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long. Metaphor: This is comparing the poet’s life to the seasons of the year by saying, “the season you see me in” (in this case Autumn/ Winter) and it reveals that his life is dying like the trees in Autumn/ Winter.

Imagery: Because life is like a circle, he is describing what stage of the circle he is at, spring being the youngest, and winter being dead. Autumn/ Winter leads to the image of a dying, old man, but Summer/ Spring will lead to the image of him being young and healthy. Metaphor: This is a metaphor for the amount of life the poet has left. He is saying that he has almost no time left and is about to die because it is nearing winter.

Imagery: This description depicts an Autumn Fall where all the leaves are yellow, drying up, and falling to the ground like the minutes this poet has left in his life. Metaphor: This is a metaphor for the poet’s body’s weakness. The poet is about to die and his body is weakening (i.e. shaking) due to aging (the cold)

Imagery: This depicts an image of a tree shaking to and fro against the cold winds of either Winter or Fall. Metaphor: This is analogous to the poets body, it is aging and the good parts of it (the choirs and the birds) are now gone while all that remain are the ruins (his current body).

Imagery: It paints a picture of the situation that he is in, the ruins are analogous to his body present body while the birds and choruses are gone. Metaphor: In this phrase, he is saying that the other person, who we don't know who it is, can see that he is a different and older person than he used to be. Metaphor: When the sun fades, he will die, the sun is his life and when it sets, he will die.

Imagery: It paints a picture of his life fading away like the sunset going over the horizon. Metaphor: He is about to die because when the sun sets there will be black and it will be the end of his life.

Imagery: When the sky is black, he is going to die and it is painting a picture like he will be no more, there will only be a black space where he was. Metaphor: This phrase means that death's second self is what all of the other people are seeing him as, just a dying old man.

Imagery: This paints a picture of death taking Shakespeare and taking him away. Metaphor: This phrase talks about how his lover sees him, she sees him as his internal self, not the dying old man on the outside, she sees his real inner being.

Imagery: The fire is analogous to his life and he tells how his lover can see his "life" or true self. Metaphor: The fire has already burned most of its “fuel” (his life) and little is remaining, when it all runs out, he will die.

Imagery: The ashes are analogous to his youth but now they are gone and have become useless ashes, the remainder of his fire. Metaphor: The “death-bed” is referring to ashes being all that is left of fire as if it is the place where the flame of his youth will be extinguished

Imagery: this line depicts all that remains of the poets youth, the ash left over as the poet dies. The pile of ashes left over represent the poets lifeless body as his soul, which was composed of youth, has been burnt out and he finally dies. Metaphor: The youth that once fueled the flame of the poet’s life had burnt out because that life no longer will supply it and will lead to the flame’s “consumption”.

Imagery: this creates an image of a sorrowful scene where everything has been burned down to ruins by the owner, even though it wasn't the owner who burned down everything, but his youth that destroyed everything he built Metaphor: When his lover senses that he is going to die, she wants to spend more time with him and that makes their love bond stronger.

Imagery: A man who going to die soon and her lover who wants to spend more time with him. Metaphor: the man is telling the lover that she is loving someone that will die very soon.

Imagery: he is describing himself dying to his wife by telling her that he is going to die soon and leave her. Another theme present in the poem is that dying is an unavoidable event in life. And the only thing that a person can do is treasure the time that they have left.
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