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"The Perils of Indifference" by: Elie Wiesel.

An explanation of its meaning and purpose.
by

Danielle Julian

on 16 December 2012

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Transcript of "The Perils of Indifference" by: Elie Wiesel.

"The Perils of Indifference
By- Elie Wiesel. The audience consisted of The President, Mrs. Clinton, Congress, Ambassador Holbrooke, and other important officials. In the speech he was addressing the nation. Ambassador Richard Holbrooke is a Jewish man, and is a great champion of justice for the Holocaust survivors and refugees. His mother and father were Jewish refugees. Ethos: Elie experienced the Holocaust and survived it.

Pathos: The audience could have had relatives in the Holocaust, or some may be Jewish and are against indifference to the Holocaust.

Logos: Elie acknowledges that the Holocaust did happen, and he doesn't want people feel indifferrence towards it. Rhetorical devices:
Tone: He has strong viewpoints to support the authoritative tone he wants to achieve.

Repetion: He repeats the word "indifference"
a few times throughout the speech.

Diction: Elie uses key words to highlight his views. Bibliography Elie Wiesel, a writer, presented this speech on April 12, 1999. It was given in the East Room of the White house as part of the Millenium Lecture series, hosted by the President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. "The History Place." The History Place. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.
"The Jewish Daily Forward." The Jewish Daily Forward. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Dec. 2012.
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