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Copy of Guided Reading Fully Loaded: Increasing Rigor Through Differentiated Instruction

This presentation includes tips and strategies to increase the rigor in guided reading lessons.
by

Abbie Vlcek

on 29 July 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Guided Reading Fully Loaded: Increasing Rigor Through Differentiated Instruction

Guided Reading Upgraded & UPdated
Support Teacher instruction
Review and update our knowledge of best practice
Develop a structure to ease planning and build routines
Above All...

INCREASE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

Session's Objectives:
The Guided Reading lesson is broken into three main segments:

Before Reading
During Reading
After Reading

Each of these segments have pieces to them that are meant to aid in the structure and increase student readiness for reading an instructional text.
Parts of a Guided Reading Lesson:
Guided Reading is NOT...

Based on one assessment
Groups of ten or more
One text/story used for all students
Teaching strategies to all students at the same time with text
Students reading for practice with text that may be too easy or too difficult
Round Robin reading
What is Guided Reading?
Guided Reading is...

Based on multiple assessments
Small groups of students (3-6) students
Multiple copies of texts based on student's instructional levels
Reinforcing skills and strategies that are determined by student needs following the scope and sequence of grade level outcomes
Students reading for practice with text at that instructional level emphasizing the use of reading STRATEGIES
1. Hold your rectangular polygon horizontally.
2. Fold on the horizontal line of symmetry by matching up the vertices.
3. Now fold this rectangle in 1/2 on the vertical line of symmetry by matching up the right angles.
4. Fold your rectangle in 1/2 on the vertical line of symmetry one more time.
5. Unfold. You should have your paper split into eighths.
6. Refold on the vertical line of symmetry.
7. Cut on the center fold to the midpoint of the rectangle.
8. Unfold.
9. Refold on the horizontal line of symmetry.
10. Pinch and push to form a mini book.
Let's Make A Buddy Book!!!
1. Warm-Up Reading

2. Building Background

3. Text Introduction

4. During Reading

5. Comprehension Conversation

6. Summary/Extension
Label
Step 1: Warm-Up Reading

Debbie Diller describes how she begins each guided reading group with familiar rereading in her book:
Making the Most of Small Groups: Differentiation for All.

Fountas & Pinnell also support this practice.
Before Guided Reading Lesson
Before Guided Reading Lesson
Step 2: Building Background

During the Building Background section of the lesson, the teacher engages a student in a
QUICK
discussion that will prepare them for reading.

Ex) "Have you ever been faced with a situation where someone was about to make a bad decision? What did you do? Well today we are going to read a story about a character who had the same thing happen to them."
Step 1: Warm Up Reading
Before Reading
Documentation

Warm-Up reading is an excellent opportunity for teachers to conduct a running record with a previously read text or take some anecdotal notes. These running records are an excellent formative assessment and provide useful information about a child's reading behaviors.
See Running Record Handout.
Why????
Step 3: Text Introduction
Before Reading:
Step 4. Reading Practice
During Reading
Step 6: Summary/Extension
After Reading
During the summary and extension portion of the Guided Reading lesson, the teacher summarizes learning and focus skill practice. Summaries should also include a reference to the posted learning goal. Teachers may assign students to reread text, finish reading text, or respond to text.
Take a moment to record:

Something I want to Start.

Something I want to stop.

Something I will keep on doing!!!
Summary
You dedication to your students is truly an amazing gift. Thank you again for ALL YOU DO for our students here in Omaha Public Schools!
Thank you for your time!!!
After activating student's prior knowledge and providing them with a 'hook' to help new learning move to long-term memory, the teacher provides a
QUICK
text introduction that will support students as they begin to read.
During this Text Intro.:
Read title
Students predict
Summarize the text
How does this text work???
PROBLEM/SOLUTION
FICTION/NONFICTION
TEXT FEATURES etc.
Set purpose



Remind student of focus skill as you refer to the objective.
Students should whisper read the text at their own pace while the teacher listens in and provides fix-up strategies. Anecdotal notes can also be take during this time to track student progress and determine student needs.
Students reading at second grade level or higher (K-Z) should be learning to read silently.

Students reading at c or above should be reading without finger tracking or finger swiping. This process interrupts fluency (Fountas & Pinnell).

Resist the urge to tell students words they are struggling with. Instead, provide them with a fix-up strategy that will lead them to success. Remember if a student is missing multiple words in a text, it may not be the correct instructional level for them.


If the entire group of students is struggling with a particular reading strategy, reading practice may be interrupted to complete a short mini-lesson on that particular skill. Reading will then resume for practice using the strategy.
Fix-Up Strategies
We want to move beyond basic comprehension questions to questions that promote deeper comprehension.

Can you generate deeper questions for the blank spaces?
Share with someone close to you!!!
Let's see it in ACTION!!!
Kindergarten Teacher video:
http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/departments/development/resources/kindergarten_broadacreses/01.shtm
Let's See it in Action!!!
Discuss with your table.

Thoughts/Impressions?
What would you do the same?
Different?
Questions?
Take a moment to write a few a-has regarding comprehension conversations in your Buddy Book.
Step 5: Comprehension Conversation
After Reading
Welcome to....
Guided Reading: Updated & Upgraded:

Please take a moment to get to know the colleagues at your table.
Activating Prior Knowledge
What do we already know?
Let's quiz ourselves.
A Balanced Literacy Approach
Omaha Public Schools has adopted a Balanced Literacy Approach to reading instruction. This is a Framework for Reading Instruction that includes instruction in Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking utilized the Gradual Release of Responsibility.
Reading instruction is provided through the following
subjects and time allotments:
Comprehension/Vocabulary 25 minutes (Basal/Core Resource)
Word Work 25 minutes (Sitton, Journeys etc.)
Differentiated Instruction 80 minutes (Instructional Leveled Text)
Writing 60 minutes (Writer's Workshop, 6-Traits, Step-UP etc.)
Quick Write
Take a moment to make a list of what you know about Guided Reading.
Guided Reading is NOT.

1.

2.

3,
Guided Reading is...

1.

2.

3.
Let's Share.
Please take a moment to record any new information in your Buddy Book.
Increased Rigor
Increases Fluency
Classroom Management
Supports Bell-to-Bell Instruction
Student Choice
Productive Transitions!
Why Build Background???
Step 2: Building Background & the Brain
"Information is most likely to get stored if it makes sense & has meaning." David Sousa 2006
Brain Research tells us that in order to learn NEW information (moving from the working memory to the long-term or permanent memory), we must establish a "hook" in the brain.
In order for the brain to "keep" new information and store it, it must be hooked to a past experience OR we must CREATE an experience together.
Building Background provides us this "hook" in our brain.
During this time we activate prior knowledge.
Fountas & Pinnell believe this is a critical component of the guided reading lesson.
Take a moment to add some main ideas to your Buddy Book on Building Background.
Ex: "Today as you read, make sure to look for opportunities to make predictions about what will happen next. Use clues from the story to support your predictions.
Before Reading
Step 3: Text Introduction
Now you give it a try:
Work in pairs at your table.
Choose an objective based on a recent comprehension strategy from the Core Resource
Read through the leveled text.
Generate a prompt to activate prior knowledge.
Intentionally choose 2-3 places to stop that will prepare students for reading the text.
Share at your table.
Record notes and/or a-has regarding Text Introductions.
A Note on Round Robin
During Reading


"You'll want your student to read as independently as possible. They should not be doing round-robin reading. This is not considered a best practice When round-robin reading, students don't get enough reading practice; they are not developing reading comprehension (it's just listening comprehension since they're taking turns and listening to each other); and it's boring...for you and them. Instead, have them read it at their own pace, not chorally but independently of each other."
Reading Behaviors
As teachers it is paramount that we get to know our students as readers. One way to do this is by taking notes of particular reading behaviors during student reading & utilizing Fountas & Pinnell's Guide for Observing and Noting Reading Behaviors.
These posters are located in your grade level conferences.
After Reading
Step 5: Comprehension Conversation
Guide students in a conversation about the book. Make sure to utilize the Continuum of Literacy Learning to choose appropriate WIthin, About, and Beyond the text questions.
Fountas & Pinnell's Question Classifications
Evidence WITHIN is literal understanding: solving words, monitoring comprehension, remember information in summary form, sustaining fluent reading. (Levels A-K)

Evidence BEYOND text: making predictions, connections, inferring, synthesizing. (Levels A-K)

Evidence ABOUT text: literary elements, writer's craft, thinking critically. (Levels L-Z)
Comprehension Conversations are an opportunity for a teacher to facilitate a discussion about the text. Teachers provide questions that stimulate student led conversations rather than a question-answer session. We want students to develop a love of reading by interacting with text rather than reading text simply to answer questions asked by the teacher.
What are some Extensions you have used in the past that were successful?
See Closure Handout.
Record 1-3 examples you plan on using from the Closure Handout.
Benefits/Road Blocks
Timed Think Pair Share
Planning for Guided Reading
Quick Write:

How are you currently

planning for guided reading? What works? What doesn't work?
Mingle & Chat.
Planning for Guided Reading
A Guided Reading Framework has developed in order to:
Taking the guess work out.
Ease planning
Plan for rigorous reading practice
Increase student achievement
Remember: This framework is meant to be a tool. Please alter it in any way you need to meet the needs of your students.
Resources
Continuum of Literacy Learning
Assessment Guide
Guided Reading Planning Framework (handout)
Balanced Literacy Flipbook
Angel
Think Central
WW for Guided Reading Quick Reference Table
Grade Level Conferences
Elementary Curriculum Consultants
Etc.
References
Making the Most of Small Groups
Continuum of Literacy Learning
Assessment Guide
Planning for Guided Reading
A guided reading framework has been developed for you to ease planning. It is an optional tool. Feel free to take and use what works for you. A couple of thing to keep in mind:
Students benefit most from reading LOTS and LOTS of instructional leveled text.
In lower leveled text, it is possible to read 4-5 different books per week; in addition to rereading familiar texts.
As texts become longer, the number of books covered during a week decreases to 2-3.
Incorporate varying genres & multiple text types.
SEE Framework Handout
Planning for Guided Reading
Primary Day A:
Planning for Guided Reading
Primary Day B:
Planning for Guided Reading
Intermediate Day A:
Planning for Guided Reading
Intermediate Day B:
Planning for Guided Reading
Intermediate Day C:
Planning for Guided Reading
Guided Reading Weekly Schedule
***Thursday & Friday are abridged groups
to allow time for book clubs/literature circles/novel studies etc. if desired.
***The total number of books indicated per week does not include the warm-up reads. It is possible for a student to read 7-15 books per week when incorporating the warm-up reading segment of guided reading lesson.
Warm-Up Reading 3-5 min.
Build Background 1-2 min.
Text Introduction 1-2 min.
Read title
Students predict
Summarize the text
How does this text work???
PROBLEM/SOLUTION
FICTION/NONFICTION
TEXT FEATURES etc.
Set purpose
Remind students of focus skill
.
Independent Reading 10-12 min.
Comprehension Conversation 3 min.
Summary/Extension
Warm-Up Reading 3-5 min.
Build Background 1-2 min.
Text Introduction 1-2 min.
Read title
Students predict
Summarize the text
How does this text work???
PROBLEM/SOLUTION
FICTION/NONFICTION
TEXT FEATURES etc.
Set purpose
Remind students of focus skill
.
Independent Reading 10-12 min.
Comprehension Conversation 3 min.
Summary/Extension
Warm-Up Reading 3-5 min.
Comprehension Conversation 2-3 min.
Build Background/Text Introduction 1-2 min.
Abridged version of Day A's Intro. Find 1-2 places where comprehension strategy is applicable.
Independent Reading 6-8 min.
Guided Writing 5-7 min.
Summary/Extension
Warm-Up Reading 3-5 min.
Comprehension Conversation 2-3 min.
Build Background/Text Introduction 1-2 min.
Read title
Students predict
Summarize the text
How does this text work???
PROBLEM/SOLUTION
FICTION/NONFICTION
TEXT FEATURES etc.
Set purpose
Remind students of focus skill
.
Independent Reading 10-12 min.
Comprehension Conversation 3 min.
Summary/Extension
Warm-Up Reading 3-5 min.
Comprehension Conversation 2-3 min.
Build Background/Text Introduction 1-2 min.



Independent Reading 6-8 min.
Guided Writing 5-7.
Summary/Extension
Step 1: Warm-Up Reading
Before Reading
Making it work!
It is extremely important to develop specific routines & procedures to make this step successful.

Students can bring their book boxes with previously read leveled texts in them to the guided reading table.
Any other suggestions?
Diller 2007 pg. 8
See Handout.
5. Solving Words
6. Maintaining Fluency
7. Other
1. Attention to Print Features
2. Detecting Errors
3. Self-Correcting
4. Searching for and Using Information
(Meaning, Structure & Visual)
Fountas & Pinnell's Sub-groups for Reading Behaviors:
Why else???
Teacher can have previously read texts available when students arrive at the table.
Keep in mind...
During Reading
Step 4: Reading Practice
Abridged version of Day A's Intro. Find 1-2 places where comprehension strategy is applicable.
Updating best practice
& increasing RIGOR!!!

increasing rigor and updating best practices
Full transcript