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Criminal Activity in the 1920s

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by

Kayti Husted

on 14 November 2012

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Transcript of Criminal Activity in the 1920s

By: Kayti Husted and Matty Gonzales Criminal Activity in the 1920s Police Complicity Bootlegging The World Series Fix Teapot Dome Scandal Bribes and Scandal Law enforcement struggled because police could not overcome corruption, could be bribed easily, and partook in criminal activities themselves. When alcohol was illegal in the United States, Canadian brewers would smuggle alcohol into the states. The World Series Fix was when in the 1919 World Series the White Sox baseball team made a deal with gangsters that they would purposely lose games for money. In 1922, Secretary Fall made a secret deal with two rich oil men in Teapot Dome, Wyoming and gave them a lease to pump oil out of the fields and sell it for themselves. Colonel Thomas W. Miller, head of the Office of Alien Property, sold valuable German patents seized in the war for below market price and was convicted of fraud. Charles Forbes, head of the Veterans Bureau, was convicted of taking at least $250 million in bribes. Fraud Conviction
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