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I.C.E.

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Kathryn C

on 13 October 2016

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Transcript of I.C.E.

I.C.E.: Introduce, Cite, Explain
Incorporating Quotes
Introduce
Make sure to explain your quotes! Provide analysis that ties them back to your main idea/topic.

In other words, comment on the evidence in order to incorporate it into the argument you're making
Explain
Don't just "stick" quotes into your paper without explaining them. When you do this, it makes you look like you don't know what you're doing!
The whole purpose of using quotes is to EXPLAIN how they help prove your argument - when you don't explain them, they are useless!
Example
Provide appropriate parenthetical citations for all quotes and paraphrases.
Cite
MLA:
If you are only discussing one source, you do not need the author's last name in your citation (as long as you mention it at some point in your writing.)
Punctuation ALWAYS goes OUTSIDE the parentheses.
Using Quotes in Writing
Be sure to INTRODUCE and INCORPORATE all of your quotes!
Examples of introductory phrases:
1.
According to Michael Smith
, "you should use the author's last name when you cite them in your paper" (1).

2.
As Smith explains,
"you can introduce your quotes with a number of different phrases" (15).
It is very interesting that, in the beginning of the section titled, “The Cyclops”, Odysseus describes the creature as a savage. “A prodigious man slept in his cave alone, and took his flocks to graze afield - remote from all companions, knowing none but savage ways” (866). “Some towering brute...all outward power, a wild man, ignorant of civility” (867). The Cyclops is a wild, large man who is ignorant. However, later, we see that it may not, in fact, be the Cyclops who has no manners - it may be Odysseus, himself. For example, when Odysseus first meets the Cyclops, he asks for a gift. “Here we stand, beholden for your help, or any gifts you give - as custom is to honor strangers...Zeus will avenge the unoffending guest” (868). As the section goes on, Odysseus proves, through his various decisions, that he may, in fact, be much more brutish than the Cyclops.
Because Loung is such a young girl when her family is forced to flee Phnom Penh, she believes everything the soldiers tell her is true. On the third day of walking, Loung "walk[ed] with a little more bounce in [her] step" (29) because she believed the soldiers when they told her the trip would only take 3 days.
When using quotes from any outside source, you must INCLUDE the name and author of that outside source at some point. It also helps to give some background information about either the article or the author, if available:
Example:
In his article, "Do Fossils Always Tell the Truth?", James Macdonald, who has a PhD in Ecology and Evolution, discusses the debate about stromatolites, some of the oldest known fossils. "Not everyone is convinced...that these fossils are authentic indicators of early life" (Macdonald), he writes.
Use brackets to change parts of quotes to better fit your sentence:
Revised Example
It is very interesting that, in the beginning of the section titled, “The Cyclops”, Odysseus describes the creature as, “knowing none but savage ways” (866) and as “a wild man, ignorant of civility” (867). However, later, we see that it may not, in fact, be the Cyclops who is ignorant and uncivil - it may be Odysseus, himself. For example, when Odysseus first meets the Cyclops, he says, “here we stand, beholden for your help, or any gifts you give - as custom is to honor strangers...Zeus will avenge the unoffending guest” (868). Although it may be the custom, in Greek culture, to give gifts to your guests, it does not seem like the proper thing to do to ask your host for a gift - or demand he give you on to spare the wrath of Zeus. As the section goes on, Odysseus proves, through his various decisions, that he may, in fact, be much more brutish than the Cyclops.
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