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Discrimination

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stephanie pelayo

on 28 January 2014

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Transcript of Discrimination

African Americans: From Subjugation to Discrimination
Period 1/Sociology

Denise Delgado
Stephanie Pelayo
Daniel Guerrero
Introduction
Inter-group relations began as a major factor with different groups or in other words race relations. Groups like the Africans experienced all levels of relations when brought to the United States. They experienced all levels such as:
Pluralism
Amalgamation
Assimilation
Discrimination
Prejudicial behavior from whites
Subjugation
Segregation
Expulsion
Violence
The Risks of having Ethnic Names
University of Chicago economist Researchers Marianne Betrand and Sendhil Mullainathan field Experiment Study
"Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal?"
white names got one callback for every 10 resumes blacks got one callback for every 15 resumes
a higher quality resume with a white sounding name made it 30 percent more likely to illicit a job call back
a higher quality resume with a black name made it only 9 percent more likely to illicit a callback
Background Information
- Discrimination began when the U.S was developing
- dated to have begin since 1619 with the beginning of slavery.

Criminal Justice System
Black men born in the United States in 2001 have a one in three chance of being incarcerated at some point in their lifetime

black men receive sentences 10 percent longer than whites and hispanics for the same crime

20 percent of blacks will get sentenced to prison compared to whites and hispanics

Criminal Justice System
Racial Discrimination is a serious problem in the Judicial system. 98 percent of judges are white. Black men are 8 times more likely to be put in prison then white men. when it comes to being given the death penalty 74 percent are given to black men
Robert E. Park
Sociologists such as Robert Park was known for his works studying the African Americans' way of living when he was a journalist. These studies had remained important when he was also a teacher and researcher at Chicago, Illinois.
He even studied how society evolved and of how civilizations were drawn to an influence of race relations among the people of not only the United States, but in every other country.
- American Civil War was fought to abolish slavery
- abolished by Congress January 31, 1865
- The end of slavery didn't stop segregation and discrimination.
- The Civil Rights Act of 1964
Unemployment
Poverty
African American unemployment rate is more than double that of whites.
- Experts believe that there are three main challenges they face when seeking jobs.
1. They encounter bias while job-hunting
2. Their communities have weaker job networks in place.
3. Credit checks by potential employers often work against them
continued...
Unemployment rate is 13%
The annual median income of Black households in 2010 was 32,068. A decline of 3.2% percent from 2009
- 27.4% of African Americans live in poverty. (2010)
- Increased to 28.1% in 2012
- Generally Blacks are living in poverty more than any other race
- 11.5% of Americans life in government housing or section 8 housing.
- The middle class White family, about 72%, owns their homes, while only about 46% of the middle class Black family owns their homes.
Full transcript