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Untitled Prezi

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by

Kathleen Won

on 28 May 2013

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IOP Presentation
Poetry by Seamus Heaney Kathleen Won
IB English 3
Mrs.Wilson
Period 2
5/28/13 The characterization of Ireland as a victim to violence in Seamus Heaney’s “Act of Union” and “Casualty” helps develop the theme of political unrest in both past and present. Thesis Statement Irish History First P.O.A Subject
Direction Medieval Ireland Religous Conflict Medieval Ireland - Ireland divided into kingdoms.

-Invasian of Cambro-Norman knights in late 1100’s.

- Norman expansion permitted by Dermot Mac Murrough, king of Leinster.

-Mac Murrough’s conflict with king of Breifne, sought help from Angevin king Henry II. -English presence in Ireland since the 12th century

-Treaty of Windsor of 1175

-English rule of law reinforced in Ireland in the 16th century

-Crown of Ireland Act 1542

-Tudor Conquest of Ireland/ Nine Years War

-Near to complete conquest achieved by the 17th century
-Conflict dates back to 17th century

-Northern land colonized by Protestants

-Pre-dominantly Catholic

-Grew further apart due to economic differences

-Treaty of 1921

-The Troubles 1960s-1990s

Heaney uses violent imagery to display how
Ireland has been subjected to brutal crimes. “And I am still imperially
Male, leaving you with pain,
The rending process in the colony,
The battering ram, the boom burst
from within”
- "Act of Union" lines 15-18 Further Analysis “And I am still imperially
Male, leaving you with pain,
The rending process in the colony,
The battering ram, the boom burst
from within”
- "Act of Union" lines 15-18 “His turned back watches too:
He was blown to bits…
Others obeyed, three nights
After they shot dead
The thirteen men in Derry”
- “ Casualty” lines 37-42
“His turned back watches too:
He was blown to bits…
Others obeyed, three nights
After they shot dead
The thirteen men in Derry”
- “ Casualty” lines 37-42 -visual imagery- violent and brutal crimes

-connotative diction- England's dominance,
Ireland's submissiveness -alliteration- emphasizes force

-allusion- Union with Ireland Act 1800.
"Thirteen veins of humanity"

Analysis References .

"Casualty" Heaney utilizes gloomy diction to emphasize the inconsolable wounds that Ireland’s history’s crimes have inflicted. Analysis Further Analysis References “No treaty…
will salve completely your…
strecthmarked body, the big pain
That leaves you raw, like opened ground, again”
- “Act of Union” lines 25-28
“Dawn-sniffing revenant,
Plodder through midnight rain
Question me again”
- “Casualty” lines 110-112
“No treaty…
will salve completely your…
strecthmarked body, the big pain
That leaves you raw, like opened ground, again”
- “Act of Union” lines 25-28 “Dawn-sniffing revenant,
Plodder through midnight rain
Question me again”
- “Casualty” lines 110-112
connotative diction- gloomy

visual imagery- highlights abuse

foreshadowing- repetition of violence "Casualty"
-26 civil rights protesters and bystanders shot
13 men killed

"Act of Union"
-About 20,000 battlefield casualties
-Death of 200,000 civilians
-50,000 sold to slavery in West Indies "Act of Union"
-Disarmament of native Irish lordships
- Replacement of Irish law and culture
-Enforcement of English common law -Bloody Sunday 1972
-The Troubles
-Religiuos discrimination
-Guerilla warfare Second P.O.A Third P.O.A References “The act sprouted an obstinate fifth column
Whose stance is growing unilateral
His heart beneath your heart is a wardrum
Mustering force.”
- “Act of Union” lines 19-22
"Act of Union"
-Irish Rebellion of 1684
-Irish Confederate Wars
Heaney characterizes the Irish people as rebellious through the use of aggressive diction towards oppressive forces they have faced. “The act sprouted an obstinate fifth column
Whose stance is growing unilateral
His heart beneath your heart is a wardrum
Mustering force.”
-"Act of Union" lines 19-22
“But he would not be held
At home by his own crowd
Whatever threats were phoned,
Whatever black flags waved”
- “Casualty” lines 60-63
“But he would not be held
At home by his own crowd
Whatever threats were phoned,
Whatever black flags waved”
- “Casualty” lines 60-63
characterization- headstrong connotative diction- creates defiant tone "Casualty"
-Continued Paramilitary warfare
-Ceasefires Conclusion -Peace Process
-Belfast Agreement of 1998, Good Friday Agreement

"Conflicts stem from the past, creating an entanglement of violence that, eventually, wears everyone out." Analysis Further Analysis Works Cited Hammer, Joshua. "In Northern Ireland, Getting Past the Troubles." Smithsonian Magazine. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 May 2013

Imbornoni, Ann Marie, Borgna Brunner Brunner, and Beth Rowen. "The Northern Irish Conflict: A Chronology." Infoplease. Infoplease, n.d. Web. 21 May 2013

"Ireland." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 21 May 2013. Web. 21 May 2013
Full transcript