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Political Advertising

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by

James Bunker

on 5 March 2015

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Transcript of Political Advertising


-According to the New York Times, $2 billion was spent on political TV ads in 2008.
There were over 380 ads created.

-Sometimes TV ads backfire:

Obama “celebrity”

Herman Cain
Television
What Does Political
Advertising Involve?
(cc) image by nuonsolarteam on Flickr
1960
1964
1952
2002 March
(cc) image by jantik on Flickr
Cost
and
Regulations
Mediums

''Yes We Can" was an online video that went viral during the 2008 election and is called the video with the most impact to any politicians image
Social Media
Source: livingroomcandidate.org
Online...
Source: Newsmax, Social Media Pull Out All Stops to Attract Political Ads
In 2010 73% of people go to the internet for the bulk of their political news

The average campaign will allocate 10% of their funds to online advertising

Allows customization
Candidate can purchase"promoted tweet"
why the transition?
Source: http://njuice.com/9tZ
Obama (known for his relatively novel concept of social media infiltration in the 2008 election) spent 7.5 million on Google alone during his last campaign
&
Purpose is for audience to gain confidence and accept their ideas
This means advertisements are designed to influence the vote
Differs from commercial advertising is that the product is a person or political philosophy rather than goods and services
Advertisement objectives need to be met within certain time frame
Have moral implications for population at large
Raises questions concerning campaign funding
The truth or reality of political claims

Negative

Advertising
Future
Is
Negative
Advertising

Effective?
A study from CNN.com states that
negative advertisements work very
well.
There is some evidence that
negative messages may be more likely
than positive ones to passively register
.
Negative information is more memorable
than positive information.
Politicians "touring the country" to gain supporters will diminish as most campaigning will be media based.

"there's a real possibility that increased transparency can initiate a more substantive two-way conversation between voters and candidates"- www.ipolitics.ca

Super PACS (the ability of donors to give unlimited funds to a campaign) will give wealthy individuals the ability to have extensive influence on campaigns
Psychological
principle of

the sleeper effect

When people are normally exposed to a highly persuasive message (such as an engaging or persuasive political ad), their attitudes toward the advocacy of the message display a significant increase.
Ron Paul
attacks
Santorum
Santorum
attacks
Romney
Romney
attacks Gingrich
Positive

Advertising
Benefits
of
positive advertising
Upbeat/positive advertising tends to appeal to the public
because it allows people to believe that things will improve
Positive ads offer people
reasons to trust candidates
Candidates seem to be
running less positive ads
Ron Paul

Advertisement
Customizes ads using information users provide of their personal profiles
Examples of
Confusing Ads
During the 2012
Republican
Primaries
Rabbit ad
by Cain
Strong ad
by Perry
Family Vacation
ad
by Santorum
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2014/09/05/watch-jon-stewart-dismantle-the-dumbest-campaign-ads-of-2014/
MORE ADS
1934
1972
1976
2002
2010
Federal Elections Campaign Act
Amendments to the FECA
McCain-Feingold
(Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act)
Citizens United v. FEC
Product/Service Ads
Candidate Ads
Broadcasters could refuse all deceptive ads except for
Gave networks
"no power of censorship over the material broadcast"
by candidates for public office
*Section 315 [47 U.S.C. §315]
Let ads like this get on the air
Increased disclosure of contributions to federal candidates
Limits on:
Contributions to federal candidates
Independent expenditures
Candidate expenditures from personal funds
Required Disclosure of political contributions
First PAC
1944
CIO for FDR
Communications Act of 1934
Struck down the ban on independent expenditures for federal campaigns
PACs
National Association of Realtors: $1,634,500
National Beer Wholesalers Assn: $1,697, 500
Honeywell International: $1,789,428
SUPER
Restore Our Future: $51,904,972
American Crossroads: $28,082,720
Winning our Future: $23,907,272
(cc) photo by medhead on Flickr
Effect of Super PACs
"Unlimited spending by supposedly independent super PACs is creating widespread perception of corruption and undermining public confidence that elected officials serve in the public interest"
POLL
One-Fourth Of Americans Less Likely To Vote Because Of Super PACs
Attack (Negative) Ads
Icecream Ad, Johnson v. Goldwater 1964
Referenced as the first of political "attack ads"
According to Lipsitz, Trost, Grossmann, & Sides, many voters claim to dislike negative campaigning on principle and want candidates to present policy proposals in a civilized manner.
So why do candidates still use them?
Psychologists feel that negative information has a tendency “to be more influential than equally extreme or equally likely positive information."
Citizens may want to hear the good qualities of the candidates but they tend to remember more about the less desirable ones when presented with them
Ads created by Super PACs cannot be controlled by candidates, which insulates the candidate from criticism even though they may support the ad
By FCC regulation, television stations have to sell advertising slots to candidates for both federal and state office at the “lowest unit rate” within 60 days of a general election and 45 days of a primary.
Super PACs don’t get the discount; they have to pay the same rates as everyone else, making the cost of super-PAC ad buys significantly higher than that of a campaign.
The government mandates that stations provide “reasonable access” to federal candidates. Stations have to allow campaigns for federal office to buy time and cannot censor their ads, regardless of content
While super PACs can raise an unlimited amount of money, the amount of time available to advertise on television is finite.
(cc) image by jantik on Flickr
First PAC
PACs
Regulated in light of the Watergate scandal by the 1974 Amendment to the FECA
SUPER
"Super PACs raised about $181 million in the last two years -- with roughly half of it coming from fewer than 200 super-rich people."
$10,000,000,000.00
In 1952, presidential candidate Dwight Eisenhower became the first candidate to use television.
In 1960, candidate John F. Kennedy made about 200 commercials.
In 1964, Lyndon B. Johnson used negative ads, which were still new at the time.
1984
In 1984, Reagan used positive ads to make it seem like voting against him meant voting against prosperity.
1988
In 1988, George HW Bush found a way to get free publicity
1992
-The Stand By Your Ad provision in the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 required politicians to say “I approve this message”
1992
In 1992, Bill Clinton used MTV and talk shows like The Arsenio Hall show to appeal to a younged audience
http://www.salon.com/2014/10/15/must_see_morning_clip_stephen_colbert_destroys_sexist_gop_campaign_ads/
http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2014/11/05/the_best_and_worst_campaign_ads_of_2014_124557.html
History of Political Ads
Full transcript