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Copy of How to Argue

intro to intelligent discourse
by

Laura Walker

on 14 March 2013

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Transcript of Copy of How to Argue

How to argue like a pro Tell me what you know What is an argument? An argument is
an attempt to change someone's thinking, not just by stating your view,
but by SUPPORTING it. Start with the conclusion If you want to bake a cake, the cake is the end product or conclusion conclusion = point 1 + point 2 + point 3 Perhaps you don't like cake... conclusion = point 1 + point 2 + point 3 Natural Order The points that support your conclusion should be presented in a logical order. If you want to ask someone on a date... You should NOT first insult their mother or tell them they're cute
when they're sleeping or ask them to shave your back If you want to ask someone on a date... You like Led Zeppelin??
Me too!!! Find common ground Ask them questions and be genuinely interested in the answers ...maybe not as interested as this guy--kind of creepy. and the most important thing of all... deodorant and toothpaste--ESSENTIAL Wait a second!! Natural order means the most logical sequence;
let's take another look at those dating steps... Deodorant and toothpaste FIRST Then continue with meaningful conversation And sooner or later,
a shared interest will be discovered Here are some types of supporting points:
statistics
expert opinions (relevant to claim)
analogies
correlations Statistics If you wanted to argue that school uniforms are a bad idea at the high school level... ...it might be helpful to show that in many high schools, enrollment dropped 20 percent after requiring a uniform. --all about the numbers Expert opinions Who is an expert? Someone with a high level of skill or knowledge in a specific area SO...
Doctor would be an expert on medical things
Art critic would know a thing or two about art
Professional athlete knows their sport
Chef could tell you about cooking BUT...
don't ask the doctor about art, UNLESS they also know a lot about art
don't ask the chef how to throw a curve ball UNLESS they also know a lot about baseball
Get the picture? In other words... What does this guy know about shirts? or this kid know about strep throat? or a duck know about insurance? Use your head! Analogy ...comparison based on similarity People take their cars in for regular tune-ups. The universe is a complex system like a watch. People's bodies, like cars, can develop problems without regular check-ups. People should get regular check-ups. A watch did not come about by accident, but was intelligently designed. The universe must also have an intelligent creator. So if you want a later curfew, you might say... Mom, Dad...If I had a later curfew, I would always come home on time. When a pizza delivery is late, they have to give you the pizza for free. So if I come home late, I will have to give you my freedom...FOR FREE! Correlation --a reciprocal relationship between two things Studies show that violent crimes, like assault, increase during the hottest months of the year. = School is HOT with no air conditioning Disciplinary problems might also rise during the hottest months of the school year And one more (we will be using this one A LOT) *hint: PAY ATTENTION! EVIDENCE from the text We are going to be doing some reading. Okay, we'll be doing A LOT of reading. Authors leave clues throughout their writing that will help you "read between the lines." You will be expected to support your in-class comments with clues from the text, as well as the other types of support mentioned. Steps to Writing a Successful
Argument!! Do your Reasearch! You have to read to
KNOW! Who's side are you on? After you read, determine your position. Step 1 Step 2 Write a claim/thesis statement! Your claim/thesis statement should:
* State your issue and your position on that
issue.
* Be in your introduction.
* Be clear and forceful!!!!! Step 3 Decide on your reasons and evidence! * You need strong, clear reasons for your opinion.
* You need evidence to support your reasons.
- fact
-statistics
-quotations Step 4 Be sure to include the opposing viewpoint
and counterargument! * You must include the other side of the
argument.
* But you must also knock it back down
with your counterargument!!!! Step 5 Organize your essay!!!!! Introduction - claim/thesis and grab your
audience!
Body - discuss your reasons and evidence.
Conclusion - opposing viewpoint,
counterargument, offer a course of
action. Step 6 Use persuasive Language! No one needs to shout to persuade, but your sentences should sound firm and strong! Avoid phrases and words like:
* probably * maybe
* I think * what do you think? Step 7 Craft a strong ending!!!!! *Make your main point one more time in a
brief summary statement.
* Include a call to action that tells your reader
what he or she should do. Finally........ Prepare
to
Argue!!!!!!!
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