Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Multigenre Projects

No description
by

Tiffany Buchanan

on 25 February 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Multigenre Projects

Multigenre Projects
How To...
Multigenre projects require a lot of in-class and out-of-class time.

The first step is to clearly explain and show examples of what exactly a multigenre project is.

Next, start topic searching. Students should be pushed to select a genuine personal choice, both in topic and the genres they choose to represent the topic. As the teacher, you may want to give students guiding questions to help them find a topic.

It may be a good idea to have mini-lessons, guide sheets, and specific due dates to help keep students on task.

Students can either store their work in a folder for the teacher to hold onto or they can compile their project in some kind of box or container that works thematically with their chosen topic.
Examples in the Content Areas
Math:
Geometry

English:
Novel study

Science:
Genetics
What Is It?
A multigenre project gets students to create five, eight, or as many as twelve different shorter writing pieces all centred around a single important topic.

Students will go outside of the essay writing box by writing in many different genres. This challenges students to explore their topic in rich, multiple ways.
When Can It Be Used?
Multigenre projects are a great way to go in-depth and look deeper into a topic. It is also a good alternative the old-fashioned term paper.

Multigenre projects can be used:
throughout a term
throughout a unit
What Genres Are There To Pick From?
Wills
Birth announcements
Radio shows
Timelines
Song lyrics
Surveys
Resumes
Family Trees
Crossword puzzles
Diplomas
Campaign speeches
Calendars
Obituaries
Manifestos
Telephone
And...
Police reports
Brochures
Diaries
Children's books
Invitations
Biographies
Telegrams
Recipes
Interviews
Fictions
Poems
Schedules
Advice columns
Email messages
Definitions
Fairy tales
Horoscopes
Membership cards
Why Use It?
Multigenre projects incorporate the same cognitive tasks as an essay but allows students to be imaginative in the way that they represent their research and thoughts.

Multigenre projects push students to:
use their own words
explore many different text formats
pay attention to spelling, grammar, and writing style

AND -- It is 100% plagiarism proof!
Driver's license
Advertisements
Telegram
Tickets
Editorials
Bulletins
Laboratory notes
Maps
Bottle labels
Billboards
Graffiti
Tattoos
Wanted posters
Plays/skits
Eulogies
Conversations
Comic strips
Menus
Bumper stickers
Magazine articles
Memos
Myths
Notes to or from the teacher
Greeting cards
Leases
Contracts
Phys. Ed.:
Dance

Social Studies:
Geography

Fine Arts:
Theatre
Optional Final Steps
To share and demonstrate the student's individual projects, you may choose to have students get into groups and create a dramatic presentation that incorporates or contributes something from each student's project.

Typically referred to as reader's theatre, students are expected to work, share, talk and plan together to find some common themes between their projects and then develop a skit or performance that showcases a piece of everyone's work.

At this point you may also choose to have students do a self-assessment and/or peer assessment on the completed projects
Variation
Another variation that you may choose to use in your classroom is rather than providing the students with as much flexibility and choice, you may prefer to set the assignment up to be more structured and focused.

Have students focus on the same topic
Provide assigned genres of your own choice
Activity
Food for Healthy Living 10
SCO 4.2 - Students will understand and analyze Canada's Food Guide and what is meant by healthy eating.
What do you know about Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide?
Teacher's Role
The teacher's role is very important!
Remember as a teacher taking on a challenge like introducing multigenre projects to a class, there are a number of important things to keep in mind
MGPs require a lot of in class and out of class work
Creating MGPs is a process
Requires strong teacher support (regular check-in, conferencing)
Provide students with clear instructions and exemplars
introduce students to different genres gradually (mini-lessons)
Try to have resources available in the classroom for students to refer to
Progress should be reviewed regularly and feedback provided
What Can Go Wrong?
Students are unfamiliar with the different types of genres (offer mini-lessons on each unfamiliar genre or stick to using familiar genres only)

Remember that many students have likely not been exposed to this type of project before so you will face the same challenges as most long term writing projects - Create a schedule and be prepared to have to guide students in the right direction and likely face some unpredictable questions and problems along the way
How Are Multigenre Projects Evaluated?
Use a rubric that not only rates the quality of each product but also contributes to the overall project score
remember you can evaluate each piece of work throughout the process and because you will be closely monitoring the student's progress and offering feedback throughout the process you will already be familiar with how students are doing
Use a simple rubric that lets students know what is important to include in each piece of work. Remaining consistent will ensure that students know what is expected of them
Consider designing a rubric with the class to identify what they think is important

Table
1
Table
2
Table
3
Table
4
Table
5
Table
6
Ages
2-3
Ages
4-8
Ages
9-13
Ages
14-18
Ages
19-50
Age
51+
-Create your own food guide
-Children's book
-Poem
-TV commercial
-Song lyrics
-Prescrip-tion
-1 week meal plan
-Radio ad
-Do's & don'ts pamphlet
-Shopping list
-Bumper sticker
-Letter to school cafeteria
-Restaurant menu
-Billboard
-Brochure
-Food diary
-Cartoon / comic strip
-Advice column
Exemplars
Brochure
To Do List
Recipe Card
Movie Poster
Survival Kit
Full transcript