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Reading for Meaning

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by

Courtney Koegle

on 9 May 2014

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Transcript of Reading for Meaning

Reading for Meaning
Helping readers build the skills necessary to make sense of challenging texts.
Why use Reading for Meaning?
Text Complexity-R4M builds the skills necessary to extract meaning from even the most rigorous text.

Evidence-Trains students to find and cite evidence to support claims.

Core Reading Skills-R4M allows teachers to craft statements to address any Common Core standards.
Implementing Reading for Meaning
Identify a short text to be read: articles, primary documents, data charts, etc.

Generate a list of statements about the text. Statements can be true or false.
Implementing Reading for Meaning
Introduce the topic and statements to students, encourage them to think of what they already know about the topic.

Have students record evidence for or against each statement while they read.
Implementing Reading for Meaning
Have students discuss their evidence in pairs or small groups. Encourage them to reach consensus about which statements are supported and refuted.

Conduct a whole class discussion in which students share and justify their positions.
Sample Lessons
Extract evidence from the text to support or refute the following claims:

Most of the volume of an atom is empty space.

The electrons orbit the nucleus much the same way that planets orbit the sun.

A carbon atom is more complex than a helium atom.
Sample Evidence Grid
The Strategy in Action
Introducing the Strategy
Guided Practice
The Kids at Work
Student Discussion
Full transcript